PHP 5.6.0beta1 released

sort

(PHP 4, PHP 5)

sortSort an array

Description

bool sort ( array &$array [, int $sort_flags = SORT_REGULAR ] )

این تابع یک آرایه را مرتب می‌کند. اعضا به ترتیب از کوچک‌تر به بزرگتر مرتب خواهد شد.

Parameters

array

آرایه ورودی.

sort_flags

پارامتر اختیاری دوم sort_flags برای تغییر رفتار مرتب‌سازی با استفاده از مقادیر زیر است:

پرچم‌های انواع مرتب‌سازی:

  • SORT_REGULAR - مقایسه موارد به صورت معمولی (انواع را تغییر نمی‌دهد)
  • SORT_NUMERIC - مقایسه موارد به صورت عددی
  • SORT_STRING - مقایسه موارد به صورت رشته‌ای
  • SORT_LOCALE_STRING - مقایسه موارد به صورت رشته براساس کدهای حروف فعلی. اضافه شده در PHP 4.4.0 در 5.0.2. پیش از PHP 6 از کدهای حروف سیستم استفاده می‌کند که با استفاده از setlocale() عوض می‌شود. از زمان PHP 6 شما باید از تابع i18n_loc_set_default() استفاده کنید.

Return Values

Returns TRUE on success or FALSE on failure.

Examples

Example #1 مثال sort()

<?php

$fruits 
= array("lemon""orange""banana""apple");
sort($fruits);
foreach (
$fruits as $key => $val) {
    echo 
"fruits[" $key "] = " $val "\n";
}

?>

The above example will output:

fruits[0] = apple
fruits[1] = banana
fruits[2] = lemon
fruits[3] = orange

میوه‌ها براساس حروف الفبا مرتب شده‌اند.

Notes

Note: This function assigns new keys to the elements in array. It will remove any existing keys that may have been assigned, rather than just reordering the keys.

Note: همانند بیشتر توابع مرتب‌سازی PHP، sort() از پیاده‌سازی » Quicksort استفاده می‌کند.

Warning

هنگام مرتب‌سازی آرایه‌های دارای مقادیر با انواع مختلف مراقب باشد چون تابع sort() نتایج غیر قابل پیشبینی تولید می‌کند.

See Also

add a note add a note

User Contributed Notes 44 notes

up
15
phpdotnet at m4tt dot co dot uk
3 years ago
Simple function to sort an array by a specific key. Maintains index association.

<?php

function array_sort($array, $on, $order=SORT_ASC)
{
   
$new_array = array();
   
$sortable_array = array();

    if (
count($array) > 0) {
        foreach (
$array as $k => $v) {
            if (
is_array($v)) {
                foreach (
$v as $k2 => $v2) {
                    if (
$k2 == $on) {
                       
$sortable_array[$k] = $v2;
                    }
                }
            } else {
               
$sortable_array[$k] = $v;
            }
        }

        switch (
$order) {
            case
SORT_ASC:
               
asort($sortable_array);
            break;
            case
SORT_DESC:
               
arsort($sortable_array);
            break;
        }

        foreach (
$sortable_array as $k => $v) {
           
$new_array[$k] = $array[$k];
        }
    }

    return
$new_array;
}

$people = array(
   
12345 => array(
       
'id' => 12345,
       
'first_name' => 'Joe',
       
'surname' => 'Bloggs',
       
'age' => 23,
       
'sex' => 'm'
   
),
   
12346 => array(
       
'id' => 12346,
       
'first_name' => 'Adam',
       
'surname' => 'Smith',
       
'age' => 18,
       
'sex' => 'm'
   
),
   
12347 => array(
       
'id' => 12347,
       
'first_name' => 'Amy',
       
'surname' => 'Jones',
       
'age' => 21,
       
'sex' => 'f'
   
)
);

print_r(array_sort($people, 'age', SORT_DESC)); // Sort by oldest first
print_r(array_sort($people, 'surname', SORT_ASC)); // Sort by surname

/*
Array
(
    [12345] => Array
        (
            [id] => 12345
            [first_name] => Joe
            [surname] => Bloggs
            [age] => 23
            [sex] => m
        )
 
    [12347] => Array
        (
            [id] => 12347
            [first_name] => Amy
            [surname] => Jones
            [age] => 21
            [sex] => f
        )
 
    [12346] => Array
        (
            [id] => 12346
            [first_name] => Adam
            [surname] => Smith
            [age] => 18
            [sex] => m
        )
 
)
Array
(
    [12345] => Array
        (
            [id] => 12345
            [first_name] => Joe
            [surname] => Bloggs
            [age] => 23
            [sex] => m
        )
 
    [12347] => Array
        (
            [id] => 12347
            [first_name] => Amy
            [surname] => Jones
            [age] => 21
            [sex] => f
        )
 
    [12346] => Array
        (
            [id] => 12346
            [first_name] => Adam
            [surname] => Smith
            [age] => 18
            [sex] => m
        )
 
)
*/

?>
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8
stepmuel at ee dot ethz dot ch
5 years ago
A little shorter way to sort an array of objects; with a callback function.

<?php
function objSort(&$objArray,$indexFunction,$sort_flags=0) {
   
$indices = array();
    foreach(
$objArray as $obj) {
       
$indeces[] = $indexFunction($obj);
    }
    return
array_multisort($indeces,$objArray,$sort_flags);
}

function
getIndex($obj) {
    return
$obj->getPosition();
}

objSort($objArray,'getIndex');
?>
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5
sinan at sinaneldem dot com
6 years ago
here is little script which will merge arrays, remove duplicates and sort it by alphabetical order:

<?php

$array1
= array('apple', 'banana','pear');
$array2 = array('grape', 'pear','orange');

function
array_unique_merge_sort($array1, $array2){
$array = array_unique(array_merge($array1, $array2));
sort($array);
foreach (
$array as $key => $value) {
   
$new[$key] = $value;
}
return
$new;
}

print_r (array_unique_merge_sort($array1, $array2));

?>

this will print out:

Array ( [0] => apple [1] => banana [2] => grape [3] => orange [4] => pear )
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4
Walter Tross
2 years ago
unless you specify the second argument, "regular" comparisons will be used. I quote from the page on comparison operators:
"If you compare a number with a string or the comparison involves numerical strings, then each string is converted to a number and the comparison performed numerically."
What this means is that "10" < "1a", and "1a" < "2", but "10" > "2". In other words, regular PHP string comparisons are not transitive.
This implies that the output of sort() can in rare cases depend on the order of the input array:
<?php
function echo_sorted($a)
{
   echo
"{$a[0]} {$a[1]} {$a[2]}";
  
sort($a);
   echo
" => {$a[0]} {$a[1]} {$a[2]}\n";
}
// on PHP 5.2.6:
echo_sorted(array( "10", "1a", "2")); // => 10 1a 2
echo_sorted(array( "10", "2", "1a")); // => 1a 2 10
echo_sorted(array( "1a", "10", "2")); // => 2 10 1a
echo_sorted(array( "1a", "2", "10")); // => 1a 2 10
echo_sorted(array( "2", "10", "1a")); // => 2 10 1a
echo_sorted(array( "2", "1a", "10")); // => 10 1a 2
?>
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2
holdoffhunger at gmail dot com
2 years ago
I have discovered an interesting trick with the sort function.  Many coders are using it to sort options for a user, because a computer will only need sorted data in limited cases.  However, every coder wants their sorted data to be usable.  It's very common to find any sorted data online, and to find options, "Sort by Date," "Sort Alphabetically," etc., etc., whether you're looking at an online catalogue or some bulletin board.

The trick is to use a combination of html commenting and str_pad's to do definitive "sort by" functions.  Let me demonstrate with an example: consider two arrays, Sorted_By_Date and Sorted_By_Name.  You want every element to be "<option value=something>Option Name</option", so that you can do a simple foreach statement that prints every option value.  But, sorting these arrays will technically sort just sort whatever you put into "value".  So, here's a neat trick.  Make every entry "<!-- Sort_Value --><option value=something>Option Name</option."  That way, when you sort, it'll have to sort technically by whatever is the Sort_Value.

The greatness of this trick is that you can make as many "sort this data by X" fields as you want!  Just create multiple arrays, each with the same option values and names, but with a different value put in "Sort_Value", which could be a date, a name, a price, etc..  With numbers, you may need to use the str_pad function, to push all of the zeros out to the left, for a proper sort.  For instance, in my code, that looks like...

<?php

                $number_of_versions_sort_value
= str_pad($number_of_versions, 20, "0", STR_PAD_LEFT);

?>
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2
nm at thenoodleman dot com
8 years ago
Faster, more effective function:

array_sort (array, ['asc'/'desc'])

Second parameter specifies whether to order ascending or descending. Default is ascending.

function array_sort($array, $type='asc'){
    $result=array();
    foreach($array as $var => $val){
        $set=false;
        foreach($result as $var2 => $val2){
            if($set==false){
                if($val>$val2 && $type=='desc' || $val<$val2 && $type=='asc'){
                    $temp=array();
                    foreach($result as $var3 => $val3){
                        if($var3==$var2) $set=true;
                        if($set){
                            $temp[$var3]=$val3;
                            unset($result[$var3]);
                        }
                    }
                    $result[$var]=$val;   
                    foreach($temp as $var3 => $val3){
                        $result[$var3]=$val3;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        if(!$set){
            $result[$var]=$val;
        }
    }
    return $result;
}

Works for ordering by integers or strings, no need to specify which.

Example:

$array=array('a' => 50, 'b' => 25, 'c' => 75);
print_r(array_sort($array));

Returns:
Array
(
[b] => 25
[a] => 50
[c] => 75
)
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4
timc at hlyw dot com
9 years ago
I dig the multi_sort function(s) from above.  But, they don't work for hash arrays.  I added a keys variable to keep track of the key value as the array gets sorted.  Feed back welcome.

<?php
function array_qsort (&$array, $column=0, $order=SORT_ASC, $first=0, $last= -2)
{
 
// $array  - the array to be sorted
  // $column - index (column) on which to sort
  //          can be a string if using an associative array
  // $order  - SORT_ASC (default) for ascending or SORT_DESC for descending
  // $first  - start index (row) for partial array sort
  // $last  - stop  index (row) for partial array sort
  // $keys  - array of key values for hash array sort
 
 
$keys = array_keys($array);
  if(
$last == -2) $last = count($array) - 1;
  if(
$last > $first) {
  
$alpha = $first;
  
$omega = $last;
  
$key_alpha = $keys[$alpha];
  
$key_omega = $keys[$omega];
  
$guess = $array[$key_alpha][$column];
   while(
$omega >= $alpha) {
     if(
$order == SORT_ASC) {
       while(
$array[$key_alpha][$column] < $guess) {$alpha++; $key_alpha = $keys[$alpha]; }
       while(
$array[$key_omega][$column] > $guess) {$omega--; $key_omega = $keys[$omega]; }
     } else {
       while(
$array[$key_alpha][$column] > $guess) {$alpha++; $key_alpha = $keys[$alpha]; }
       while(
$array[$key_omega][$column] < $guess) {$omega--; $key_omega = $keys[$omega]; }
     }
     if(
$alpha > $omega) break;
    
$temporary = $array[$key_alpha];
    
$array[$key_alpha] = $array[$key_omega]; $alpha++;
    
$key_alpha = $keys[$alpha];
    
$array[$key_omega] = $temporary; $omega--;
    
$key_omega = $keys[$omega];
   }
  
array_qsort ($array, $column, $order, $first, $omega);
  
array_qsort ($array, $column, $order, $alpha, $last);
  }
}
?>
up
3
james at miicro dot net
8 years ago
It's useful to know that if you're using this function on a multidimensional array, php will sort the first key, then the second and so on. This is similar to being able to use SQL to order by field1, field2 etc.

So:

Array (
[0] => Array ( [category] => work [name] => Smith )
[1] => Array ( [category] => play [name] => Johnson )
[2] => Array ( [category] => work [name] => Berger )
)

will become:

Array (
[0] => Array ( [category] => play [name] => Johnson )
[1] => Array ( [category] => work [name] => Berger )
[2] => Array ( [category] => work [name] => Smith )
)

Hope it helps someone.
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1
ajanata at gmail dot com
2 years ago
This took me longer than it should have to figure out, but if you want the behavior of sort($array, SORT_STRING) (that is, re-indexing the array unlike natcasesort) in a case-insensitive manner, it is a simple matter of doing usort($array, strcasecmp).
up
1
markrose at markrose dot ca
2 years ago
I've yet to come across a fast way to merge sorted arrays by a user value. Merging the arrays and using PHP's usort isn't efficient, as it doesn't take advantage of the existing sorting. So I wrote my own merge sorted arrays by user value function. The limit parameter can be used be used to limit the number of results (there is no point sorting more results than needed). This sort is stable: values will be taken preferentially from the first, then second, etc., array inside $merge_arrays.

Note that this function will fail if a user value is boolean false. It could be adapted to hold the best value inside an array at some performance penalty. It could also be adapted to comparing strings case-insensitively.

To give you some idea of the performance, my machine will sort out the first 1000 values of 10 sorted arrays of 1000 values each in under 40 ms, using an integer sort field. Not fast by C standards, but a vast improvement over usort'ing 10,000 values.

<?php
function merge_sorted_arrays_by_field ($merge_arrays, $sort_field, $sort_desc = false, $limit = 0)
{
   
$array_count = count($merge_arrays);
   
   
// fast special cases...
   
switch ($array_count)
    {
        case
0: return array();
        case
1: return $limit ? array_slice(reset($merge_arrays), 0, $limit) : reset($merge_arrays);
    }
   
    if (
$limit === 0)
       
$limit = PHP_INT_MAX;
   
   
// rekey merge_arrays array 0->N
   
$merge_arrays = array_values($merge_arrays);

   
$best_array = false;
   
$best_value = false;
   
   
$results = array();
   
   
// move sort order logic outside the inner loop to speed things up
   
if ($sort_desc)
    {
        for (
$i = 0; $i < $limit; ++$i)
        {
            for (
$j = 0; $j < $array_count; ++$j)
            {
               
// if the array $merge_arrays[$j] is empty, skip to next
               
if (false === ($current_value = current($merge_arrays[$j])))
                    continue;
               
               
// if we don't have a value for this round, or if the current value is bigger...
               
if ($best_value === false || $current_value[$sort_field] > $best_value[$sort_field])
                {
                   
$best_array = $j;
                   
$best_value = $current_value;
                }
            }
           
           
// all arrays empty?
           
if ($best_value === false)
                break;
           
           
$results[] = $best_value;
           
$best_value = false;
           
next($merge_arrays[$best_array]);
        }
    }
    else
    {
        for (
$i = 0; $i < $limit; ++$i)
        {
            for (
$j = 0; $j < $array_count; ++$j)
            {
                if (
false === ($current_value = current($merge_arrays[$j])))
                    continue;
               
               
// if we don't have a value for this round, or if the current value is smaller...
               
if ($best_value === false || $current_value[$sort_field] < $best_value[$sort_field])
                {
                   
$best_array = $j;
                   
$best_value = $current_value;
                }
            }
           
           
// all arrays empty?
           
if ($best_value === false)
                break;
           
           
$results[] = $best_value;
           
$best_value = false;
           
next($merge_arrays[$best_array]);
        }
    }
   
    return
$results;
}
?>
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1
jalil at measat dot org
5 years ago
this is an implementation of the complement of
Matthew Hood's objectSort (http://my.php.net/manual/en/function.sort.php#75036), which i found very convenient for sorting objects.

this does the reverse, it sorts according to the key
selected for the object but in reverse order.
and having both sort methods allows consistency and convenience for sorting objects, if speed isn't your major concern.

the only change ( apart form data being reworded as object )  is the use of < instead of > in the original.
you could of couse incorporate all in one routine, but why
complicate matters.

<?php
   
function objectRSort(&$object, $key)
    {
        for (
$i = count($object) - 1; $i >= 0; $i--)
        {
         
$swapped = false;
          for (
$j = 0; $j < $i; $j++)
          {
               if (
$object[$j]->$key < $object[$j + 1]->$key)
               {
                   
$tmp = $object[$j];
                   
$object[$j] = $object[$j + 1];      
                   
$object[$j + 1] = $tmp;
                   
$swapped = true;
               }
          }
          if (!
$swapped) return;
        }
    }
?>
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1
NBS Studio
6 years ago
This is my way of sorting files into date modified date order. It worked for me!

$dir='topics';
$ext='php5';
$files=scandir($dir);
foreach($files as $fs){
    if(($fs!='.')&&($fs!='..')){
        $fs1.='¬'.filemtime($dir.'/'.$fs).'#'.$fs;
    }
}
$fs2=split('[¬]',$fs1);
arsort($fs2);
foreach($fs2 as $fs3){
    if(eregi($ext,$fs3)){
        $fs4.='¬'.$fs3;
    }
}
$fs5=split('[#]',$fs4);
foreach($fs5 as $fs6){
    if(eregi($ext,$fs6)){
        $fs7.='¬'.$fs6;
    }
}
$fs8=split('[¬]',$fs7);
foreach($fs8 as $fs9){
    $file_list.=$fs9.'
</br>';
}

print $file_list;
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1
joris at mangrove dot nl
7 years ago
Commenting on note http://www.php.net/manual/en/function.sort.php#62311 :

Sorting an array of objects will not always yield the results you desire.

As pointed out correctly in the note above, sort() sorts the array by value of the first member variable. However, you can not always assume the order of your member variables! You must take into account your class hierarchy!

By default, PHP places the inherited member variables on top, meaning your first member variable is NOT the first variable in your class definition!
However, if you use code analyzers or a compile cache, things can be very different. E.g., in eAccelerator, the inherited member variables are at the end, meaning you get different sort results with caching on or off.

Conclusion:
Never use sort on arrays with values of a type other than scalar or array.
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1
g8z at yahoo dot com
7 years ago
<?php
/**
This sort function allows you to sort an associative array while "sticking" some fields.

$sticky_fields = an array of fields that should not be re-sorted. This is a method of achieving sub-sorts within contiguous groups of records that have common data in some fields.

Courtesy of the $5 Script Archive: http://www.tufat.com
**/

define( 'ASC_AZ', 1000 );
define( 'DESC_AZ', 1001 );
define( 'ASC_NUM', 1002 );
define( 'DESC_NUM', 1003 );

function
stickysort( $arr, $field, $sort_type, $sticky_fields = array() ) {
   
$i = 0;
    foreach (
$arr as $value) {
       
$is_contiguous = true;
        if(!empty(
$grouped_arr)) {
           
$last_value = end($grouped_arr[$i]);

            if(!(
$sticky_fields == array())) {
                foreach (
$sticky_fields as $sticky_field) {
                    if (
$value[$sticky_field] <> $last_value[$sticky_field]) {
                       
$is_contiguous = false;
                        break;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        if (
$is_contiguous)
           
$grouped_arr[$i][] = $value;
        else
           
$grouped_arr[++$i][] = $value;
    }
   
$code = '';
    switch(
$sort_type) {
        case
ASC_AZ:
           
$code .= 'return strcasecmp($a["'.$field.'"], $b["'.$field.'"]);';
            break;
        case
DESC_AZ:
           
$code .= 'return (-1*strcasecmp($a["'.$field.'"], $b["'.$field.'"]));';
            break;
        case
ASC_NUM:
           
$code .= 'return ($a["'.$field.'"] - $b["'.$field.'"]);';
            break;
        case
DESC_NUM:
           
$code .= 'return ($b["'.$field.'"] - $a["'.$field.'"]);';
            break;
    }

   
$compare = create_function('$a, $b', $code);

    foreach(
$grouped_arr as $grouped_arr_key=>$grouped_arr_value)
       
usort ( $grouped_arr[$grouped_arr_key], $compare );

   
$arr = array();
    foreach(
$grouped_arr as $grouped_arr_key=>$grouped_arr_value)
        foreach(
$grouped_arr[$grouped_arr_key] as $grouped_arr_arr_key=>$grouped_arr_arr_value)
           
$arr[] = $grouped_arr[$grouped_arr_key][$grouped_arr_arr_key];

    return
$arr;
}
?>
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2
james at miicro dot net
8 years ago
Further to john dot dutcher at highmark dot com's comments - padding the name could cause a problem if you get abnormally long names, it might be better to rebuild the array thus:

Array (
[0] => Array ( [sortname_01] => Dutcher [sortname_02] => F [sortname_03] => John [name] => Dutcher, John F )
[1] => Array ( [sortname_01] => Dutch [sortname_02] => A [sortname_03] => Roger [name] => Dutch, Roger A )
[2] => Array ( [sortname_01] => Dut [sortname_02] => H [sortname_03] => Maurice [name] => Dut, Maurice H )
[3] => Array ( [sortname_01] => Dut [sortname_02] => S [sortname_03] => Mildred [name] => Dut, Mildred S )
)

which should give:

Array (
[0] => Array ( [sortname_01] => Dut [sortname_02] => H [sortname_03] => Maurice [name] => Dut, Maurice H )
[1] => Array ( [sortname_01] => Dut [sortname_02] => S [sortname_03] => Mildred [name] => Dut, Mildred S )
[2] => Array ( [sortname_01] => Dutch [sortname_02] => A [sortname_03] => Roger [name] => Dutch, Roger A )
[3] => Array ( [sortname_01] => Dutcher [sortname_02] => F [sortname_03] => John [name] => Dutcher, John F )
)
up
1
Brecht Cloetens
4 years ago
<?php
   
/**
 * function: array_columns
 * author: Brecht Cloetens
 * params: $a = array() // original array
 *         $c = int() // number of columns
 */
function array_columns(&$a, $c=2)
{
   
$m = ceil(count($a)/$c);
   
$j = 0;
    for(
$i=0; $i<$m; $i++) {
        for(
$k=0; $k<$c; $k++) {
           
$key = $i+($m*$k);
           
settype($key,'integer');
            if(
array_key_exists($key,$a)) {
               
$b[$j] = $a[$key];
               
$j++;
            }
        }
    }
   
$a = $b;
}

$arr = range('a','z');
array_columns($arr,4);
print_r($arr);

?>

Example:
array(1,2,3,4,5) will be converted to array(1,4,2,5,3);

This can be easy if you want to display an array into a specified number of columns.

<table>
    <tr>
        <td>$arr[0] => 1</td>
        <td>$arr[1] => 4</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>$arr[2] => 2</td>
        <td>$arr[3] => 5</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>$arr[4] => 3</td>
        <td></td>
    </tr>
</table>
up
1
alex [at] vkpb [dot] com
7 years ago
Sorting of an array by a method of inserts.

<?

 
       function sortByField($multArray,$sortField,$desc=true){
            $tmpKey='';
            $ResArray=array();

            $maIndex=array_keys($multArray);
            $maSize=count($multArray)-1;

            for($i=0; $i < $maSize ; $i++) {

               $minElement=$i;
               $tempMin=$multArray[$maIndex[$i]][$sortField];
               $tmpKey=$maIndex[$i];

                for($j=$i+1; $j <= $maSize; $j++)
                  if($multArray[$maIndex[$j]][$sortField] < $tempMin ) {
                     $minElement=$j;
                     $tmpKey=$maIndex[$j];
                     $tempMin=$multArray[$maIndex[$j]][$sortField];

                  }
                  $maIndex[$minElement]=$maIndex[$i];
                  $maIndex[$i]=$tmpKey;
            }

           if($desc)
               for($j=0;$j<=$maSize;$j++)
                  $ResArray[$maIndex[$j]]=$multArray[$maIndex[$j]];
           else
              for($j=$maSize;$j>=0;$j--)
                  $ResArray[$maIndex[$j]]=$multArray[$maIndex[$j]];

           return $ResArray;
       }

// make array
$array['aaa']=array("name"=>"vasia","order"=>1);
$array['bbb']=array("name"=>"petia","order"=>2);
$array['ccc']=array("name"=>"kolia","order"=>3);
$array['ddd']=array("name"=>"zenia","order"=>4);

// set sort
$SortOrder=0; // desc by default , 1- asc

var_dump(sortByField($array,'order',$SortOrder));

array
  'ddd' =>
    array
      'name' => 'zenia' (length=5)
      'order' => 4
  'aaa' =>
    array
      'name' => 'vasia' (length=5)
      'order' => 1
  'bbb' =>
    array
      'name' => 'petia' (length=5)
      'order' => 2
  'ccc' =>
    array
      'name' => 'kolia' (length=5)
      'order' => 3

?>
up
2
cmarshall at gmx dot de
2 years ago
I read up on various problems re: sort() and German Umlaut chars and my head was soon spinning - bug in sort() or not, solution via locale or not, etc. ... (a total newbie here).

The obvious solution for me was quick and dirty: transform the Umlaut chars (present as HTML codes in my case) to their normal equivalent ('ä' = 'ae', 'ö' = 'oe', 'ü' = 'ue', 'ß' = 'ss' etc.), sort the array, then transform back. However there are cases in which a 'Mueller' is really that and does NOT need to be transformed into 'Müller' afterwards. Hence I for example replace the Umlaut itself with it's normal equivalent plus a char not used in the string otherwise (e.g. '_') so that the transfer back to Umlaut would only take place on certain combinations.

Of course any other char instead of '_' can be used as additional char (influencing the sort result). I know that my solution is rough at the edges and may cause other sort problems but it was sufficient for my purpose.

The array '$dat' in this example was filled with German town names (I actually worked with a multiple array ('$dat[][]') but stripped the code down to this as it's easier to understand):

<?php
// START Pre-sorting (Umlaut -> normal letters)
$max = count($dat);
for(
$totcnt = 0; $totcnt < $max; $totcnt++){
  
$dat[$totcnt]=str_replace('&szlig;','ss_',$dat[$totcnt]);
  
$dat[$totcnt]=str_replace('&Auml;','Ae_',$dat[$totcnt]);
  
$dat[$totcnt]=str_replace('&auml;','ae_',$dat[$totcnt]);
  
$dat[$totcnt]=str_replace('&Ouml;','Oe_',$dat[$totcnt]);
  
$dat[$totcnt]=str_replace('&ouml;','oe_',$dat[$totcnt]);
  
$dat[$totcnt]=str_replace('&Uuml;','Ue_',$dat[$totcnt]);
  
$dat[$totcnt]=str_replace('&uuml;','ue_',$dat[$totcnt]);
}
// END Pre-sorting (Umlaut -> normal letters)

// START Sorting //
function compare_towns($a, $b)
{
return
strnatcmp($a, $b);
}
usort($dat, 'compare_towns');
// END Sorting //

// START Post-sorting (normal letters -> Umlaut)
for($totcnt = 0; $totcnt < $max; $totcnt++){
  
$dat[$totcnt]=str_replace('ss_','&szlig;',$dat[$totcnt]);
  
$dat[$totcnt]=str_replace('Ae_','&Auml;',$dat[$totcnt]);
  
$dat[$totcnt]=str_replace('ae_','&auml;',$dat[$totcnt]);
  
$dat[$totcnt]=str_replace('Oe_','&Ouml;',$dat[$totcnt]);
  
$dat[$totcnt]=str_replace('oe_','&ouml;',$dat[$totcnt]);
  
$dat[$totcnt]=str_replace('Ue_','&Uuml;',$dat[$totcnt]);
  
$dat[$totcnt]=str_replace('ue_','&uuml;',$dat[$totcnt]);
}
// END Post-sorting (normal letters -> Umlaut)
?>
up
1
williamprogphp at[pleaseNOTSPAM] yahoo d
3 months ago
In order to make some multidimensional quick sort implementation, take advantage of this stuff

<?php
       
function quickSortMultiDimensional($array, $chave) {
            if(
count( $array ) < 2 ) {
                return
$array;
            }
           
$left = $right = array( );
           
reset( $array );
           
$pivot_key    = key( $array );
           
$pivot    = array_shift( $array );
            foreach(
$array as $k => $v ) {
                if(
$v[$chave] < $pivot[$chave] )
                       
$left[$k][$chave] = $v[$chave];
                else
                       
$right[$k][$chave] = $v[$chave];
            }
            return
array_merge(
                                   
quickSortMultiDimensional($left, $chave),
                                    array(
$pivot_key => $pivot),
                                   
quickSortMultiDimensional($right, $chave)
            );           
        }
?>

I make it using the idea from pageconfig dot com

tks for viewing
up
1
g8z at yahoo dot com
7 years ago
<?php
/**
This sort function allows you to sort an associative array while "sticking" some fields.

$sticky_fields = an array of fields that should not be re-sorted. This is a method of achieving sub-sorts within contiguous groups of records that have common data in some fields.

For example:

$a = array();

$a []= array(
    'name'         => 'Sam',
    'age'         => 23,
    'hire_date'    => '2004-01-01'
);
$a []= array(
    'name'        => 'Sam',
    'age'        => 44,
    'hire_date'    => '2003-03-23'
);
$a []= array(
    'name'        => 'Jenny',
    'age'        => 20,
    'hire_date' => '2000-12-31'
);
$a []= array(
    'name'        => 'Samantha',
    'age'        => 50,
    'hire_date' => '2000-12-14'
);

$sticky_fields = array( 'name' );
print_r( stickysort( $a, 'age', DESC_NUM, $sticky_fields ) );

OUTPUT:

Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [name] => Sam
            [age] => 44
            [hire_date] => 2003-03-23
        )
    [1] => Array
        (
            [name] => Sam
            [age] => 23
            [hire_date] => 2004-01-01
        )
    [2] => Array
        (
            [name] => Jenny
            [age] => 20
            [hire_date] => 2000-12-31
        )
    [3] => Array
        (
            [name] => Samantha
            [age] => 50
            [hire_date] => 2000-12-14
        )
)

Here's why this is the correct output - the "name" field is sticky, so it cannot change its sort order. Thus, the "age" field is only sorted as a sub-sort within records where "name" is identical. Thus, the "Sam" records are reversed, because 44 > 23, but Samantha remains at the bottom, even though her age is 50. This is a way of achieving "sub-sorts" and "sub-sub-sorts" (and so on) within records of identical data for specific fields.

Courtesy of the $5 Script Archive: http://www.tufat.com
**/

define( 'ASC_AZ', 1000 );
define( 'DESC_AZ', 1001 );
define( 'ASC_NUM', 1002 );
define( 'DESC_NUM', 1003 );

function
stickysort( $arr, $field, $sort_type, $sticky_fields = array() ) {
   
$i = 0;
    foreach (
$arr as $value) {
       
$is_contiguous = true;
        if(!empty(
$grouped_arr)) {
           
$last_value = end($grouped_arr[$i]);

            if(!(
$sticky_fields == array())) {
                foreach (
$sticky_fields as $sticky_field) {
                    if (
$value[$sticky_field] <> $last_value[$sticky_field]) {
                       
$is_contiguous = false;
                        break;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        if (
$is_contiguous)
           
$grouped_arr[$i][] = $value;
        else
           
$grouped_arr[++$i][] = $value;
    }
   
$code = '';
    switch(
$sort_type) {
        case
ASC_AZ:
           
$code .= 'return strcasecmp($a["'.$field.'"], $b["'.$field.'"]);';
            break;
        case
DESC_AZ:
           
$code .= 'return (-1*strcasecmp($a["'.$field.'"], $b["'.$field.'"]));';
            break;
        case
ASC_NUM:
           
$code .= 'return ($a["'.$field.'"] - $b["'.$field.'"]);';
            break;
        case
DESC_NUM:
           
$code .= 'return ($b["'.$field.'"] - $a["'.$field.'"]);';
            break;
    }

   
$compare = create_function('$a, $b', $code);

    foreach(
$grouped_arr as $grouped_arr_key=>$grouped_arr_value)
       
usort ( $grouped_arr[$grouped_arr_key], $compare );

   
$arr = array();
    foreach(
$grouped_arr as $grouped_arr_key=>$grouped_arr_value)
        foreach(
$grouped_arr[$grouped_arr_key] as $grouped_arr_arr_key=>$grouped_arr_arr_value)
           
$arr[] = $grouped_arr[$grouped_arr_key][$grouped_arr_arr_key];

    return
$arr;
}
?>
up
1
Emiliyan at ServicesBG dot Com
8 years ago
#This is a function that will sort an array...
function sort_by($array,  $keyname = null, $sortby) {
   $myarray = $inarray = array();   
   # First store the keyvalues in a seperate array
    foreach ($array as $i => $befree) {
        $myarray[$i] = $array[$i][$keyname];
    }
   # Sort the new array by
    switch ($sortby) {
    case 'asc':
    # Sort an array and maintain index association...
    asort($myarray);
    break;
    case 'arsort':
    # Sort an array in reverse order and maintain index association
    arsort($myarray);
    break;
    case 'natcasesor':
    # Sort an array using a case insensitive "natural order" algorithm
    natcasesort($myarray);
    break;
    }
    # Rebuild the old array
    foreach ( $myarray as $key=> $befree) {
       $inarray[$key] = $array[$key];
    }
    return $inarray;
}
sort_by(); example...
$info = sort_by($myarray, 'name', $use = 'asc');   
print_r($info);
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1
arjan321 at hotmail dot com
11 years ago
Ik you want to sort case insensitive, use the natcasesort()
up
0
alex dot hristov dot 88 at gmail dot com
2 years ago
As some people have mentioned before sorting a multidimentional array can be a bit tricky. it took me quite a while to get it going but it works as a charm:

<?php
//$order has to be either asc or desc
 
function sortmulti ($array, $index, $order, $natsort=FALSE, $case_sensitive=FALSE) {
        if(
is_array($array) && count($array)>0) {
            foreach(
array_keys($array) as $key)
           
$temp[$key]=$array[$key][$index];
            if(!
$natsort) {
                if (
$order=='asc')
                   
asort($temp);
                else   
                   
arsort($temp);
            }
            else
            {
                if (
$case_sensitive===true)
                   
natsort($temp);
                else
                   
natcasesort($temp);
            if(
$order!='asc')
               
$temp=array_reverse($temp,TRUE);
            }
            foreach(
array_keys($temp) as $key)
                if (
is_numeric($key))
                   
$sorted[]=$array[$key];
                else   
                   
$sorted[$key]=$array[$key];
            return
$sorted;
        }
    return
$sorted;
}
?>
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0
anaz114119 at gmail dot com
3 years ago
sort from textfile by coloumn
example name||date||time||comments
if you want to sort by date
$column = 2
<?php
function array_sort($array,$column){
 
$column = $column-1;
 foreach(
$array as $line){
 
$bits = explode("||",$line);
 
$bits ="$bits[$column]**$line";
 
$array1[]=$bits;
}
 
asort($array1);
 foreach(
$array1 as $line){
 
$bit = explode("**",$line);
 
$bit ="$bit[1]";
 
$array2[]=$bit;
}
 return
$array2;
}
?>
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0
poulou_0 at hotmail dot com
3 years ago
if you are not interested in high or low case sort

<?php
//where
$sortable_array[$k] = $v2;
//put
$sortable_array[$k] = strtolower($v2);

//and where
$sortable_array[$k] = $v;
//put
$sortable_array[$k] = strtolower($v);
?>
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0
eriewave at hotmail dot com
4 years ago
If you need to sort an array containing some equivalent values and you want the equivalents to end up next to each other in the overall order (similar to a MySQL's ORDER BY output), rather than breaking the function, do this:

<?php

sort
($array, ksort($array))

?>

-When the sort() function finds two equivalents, it will sort them arbitrarily by their key #'s as a second parameter.

-Dirk
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0
Dollar Hauler Admin
4 years ago
I could never find a way to sort multidimensional arrays with 5+ keys while maintaining the data structure, but here it is:

(you can add an infinite number of keys, but it has to be added manually :\ )

<?php

$array
[0]['name']  = 'Chris';
$array[0]['phone'] = '3971095';
$array[0]['year']  = '1978';
$array[0]['address'] = 'Street 1';

$array[1]['name']  = 'Breanne';
$array[1]['phone'] = '3766350';
$array[1]['year']  = '1990';
$array[1]['address'] = 'Street 2';

$array[2]['name']  = 'Dusty';
$array[2]['phone'] = '1541120';
$array[2]['year']  = '1982';
$array[2]['address'] = 'Street 3';

function
multisort($array, $sort_by, $key1, $key2=NULL, $key3=NULL, $key4=NULL, $key5=NULL, $key6=NULL){
   
// sort by ?
   
foreach ($array as $pos =>  $val)
       
$tmp_array[$pos] = $val[$sort_by];
   
asort($tmp_array);
   
   
// display however you want
   
foreach ($tmp_array as $pos =>  $val){
       
$return_array[$pos][$sort_by] = $array[$pos][$sort_by];
       
$return_array[$pos][$key1] = $array[$pos][$key1];
        if (isset(
$key2)){
           
$return_array[$pos][$key2] = $array[$pos][$key2];
            }
        if (isset(
$key3)){
           
$return_array[$pos][$key3] = $array[$pos][$key3];
            }
        if (isset(
$key4)){
           
$return_array[$pos][$key4] = $array[$pos][$key4];
            }
        if (isset(
$key5)){
           
$return_array[$pos][$key5] = $array[$pos][$key5];
            }
        if (isset(
$key6)){
           
$return_array[$pos][$key6] = $array[$pos][$key6];
            }
        }
    return
$return_array;
    }

//usage (only enter the keys you want sorted):

$sorted = multisort($array,'year','name','phone','address');
print_r($sorted);

//output:
Array ( [0] => Array ( [year] => 1978 [name] => Chris [phone] => 3971095 [address] => Street 1 ) [2] => Array ( [year] => 1982 [name] => Dusty [phone] => 1541120 [address] => Street 3 ) [1] => Array ( [year] => 1990 [name] => Breanne [phone] => 3766350 [address] => Street 2 ) )
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0
petr dot biza at gmail dot com
4 years ago
Here is a function to sort an array by the key of his sub-array with keep key in top level.

<?php
function sksort(&$array, $subkey="id", $sort_descending=false, $keep_keys_in_sub = false) {
   
$temp_array = $array;

    foreach (
$temp_array as $key => &$value) {
     
     
$sort = array();
      foreach (
$value as $index => $val) {
         
$sort[$index] = $val[$subkey];
      }
     
     
asort($sort);
     
     
$keys = array_keys($sort);
     
$newValue = array();
      foreach (
$keys as $index) {
        if(
$keep_keys_in_sub)
           
$newValue[$index] = $value[$index];
          else
           
$newValue[] = $value[$index];
      }
     
      if(
$sort_descending)
       
$value = array_reverse($newValue, $keep_keys_in_sub);
      else
       
$value = $newValue;
    }
   
   
$array = $temp_array;
  }
?>
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0
phpnet at theindy dot net
4 years ago
In response to the msort function I find that the array_multisort function is a lot faster.

-John
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0
danm68 at gmail dot com
4 years ago
sort() used with strings doesn't sort just alphabetically. It sorts all upper-case strings alphabetically first and then sorts lower-case strings alphabetically second.
Just in case anyone was as confused as I was and I've never seen this mentioned anywhere.
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0
otobrglez at gmail dot com
5 years ago
This will select number of unique keys from array and order them in original order.

<?php
/*
$rows - array of records
$st - number of keys that you want to have

By Oto Brglez.

*/

$pom_k = array();
for(
$i=0; $i<$st;){
   
$pom = array_rand($rows,1);
    if(!
in_array($pom,$pom_k)){
       
$pom_k[] = $pom;
       
$i++;
    };
};
sort($pom_k,SORT_NUMERIC);

?>
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0
www at designdetector dot com
5 years ago
To sort an array of multiple text fields alphabetically you have to make the text lowercase before sorting the array. Otherwise PHP puts acronyms before words. You can see this in my example code. Simply store the original text field at the end of the array line and call it later from there. You can safely ignore the lowercase version which is added to the start of the array line.

<?php
echo '<pre>ORIGINAL DATA:
<br />'
;

$data = array(
'Saturn|7|8|9|0||',
'Hello|0|1|2|3||',
'SFX|5|3|2|4||',
'HP|9|0|5|6||'
);

print_r($data);

sort($data);
reset($data);

echo
'<br />RAW SORT:
<br />'
;

print_r($data);

for (
$c = 0; $c < count($data); $c++) {
    list (
$letter,$g1,$g2,$g3,$g4,$end) = explode ('|', $data[$c]);
   
$lowercase = strtolower($letter);
   
$data2[$c] = array($lowercase,$g1,$g2,$g3,$g4,$letter);
}

sort($data2);
reset($data2);

echo
'<br />LOWERCASE SORT:
<br />'
;

print_r($data2);

echo
'</pre>';
?>
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0
matpatnik at hotmail dot com
6 years ago
This function will sort entity letters eg:&eacute;

I hope that help someone

function sort_entity($array) {
    $total = count($array);
    for ($i=0;$i<$total;$i++) {
        if ($array[$i]{0} == '&') {
            $array[$i] = $array[$i]{1}.$array[$i];
        } else {
            $array[$i] = $array[$i]{0}.$array[$i];
        }
    }
    sort($array);
   
    for ($i=0;$i<$total;$i++) {
        $array[$i] = substr($array[$i],1);
    }
   
    return $array;
}
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0
ludvig dot ericson at gmail dot com
8 years ago
A tip for those who like "raul at jimi dot com dot mx" need to preserve keys after changing stuff in the middle of an array:
array_values.

Example:
<?php
$array
= array(1, 2, 5, 9, 3);
unset(
$array[3]); // Remove index 3, which is 9.
$array = array_values($array);
?>

Hint: array_values can be fine for removing keys and reindex them by number instead, too (applies to functions like posix_pwgetuid which returns an associative array, unlike C and others, call array_values on it, and it'll be the same format IIRC.)
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0
jesper at snt dot utwente dot nl
8 years ago
If you sort an array of objects, the first variable in the object will be used for sorting:

<?php
class foo
{
  var
$value; //First variable: Used for sorting
 
var $id;

  function
foo($i, $v)
  {
    
$this->id = $i;
    
$this->value = $v;
  }

}

for (
$i = 0; $i < 10; $i++)
{
 
$bar[] = new foo($i,rand(1,10));
}

// This will sort on value
sort($bar);
print_r($bar);
?>

Compare the piece of code above with the following:

<?php
class foo
{
  var
$id; //First variable: Used for sorting
 
var $value;

  function
foo($i, $v)
  {
    
$this->id = $i;
    
$this->value = $v;
  }

}

for (
$i = 0; $i = 10; $i++)
{
 
$bar[] = new foo($i,rand(1,10));
}

// This will sort on id
sort($bar);
print_r($bar);
?>

As you can see the location of declaration of the variables matter!
If you want to sort on both or on a combination of variables, use ksort()
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0
jerome a-t+ yamafoto d*o*t com
8 years ago
when sorting an array, beware of variable type from elements you put in this array

Example:

$a = 2; // $a is an integer
$b = 'item';
$arr = array($a, $b);
sort($arr);

print_r($arr);

this will output:
$arr[0] = 'item';
$arr[1] = 2;

$a = '2'; // $a is a string
$b = 'item';
$arr = array($a, $b);
sort($arr);

print_r($arr);

this will output:
$arr[0] = '2';
$arr[1] = 'item'

to avoid this problem use:

sort($arr, SORT_STRING)
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0
raul at jimi dot com dot mx
8 years ago
I had an array like this:
$arr=array (1,4,3,6,5);

which returns this:
$arr[0]=1
$arr[1]=4
$arr[2]=3
$arr[3]=6
$arr[4]=5

But lets say i remove [2] which is number 3, i get:

$arr[0]=1
$arr[1]=4
$arr[3]=6
$arr[4]=5

And i want to reindex without doing a sort because i dont want to lose the order of the numbers (like a pop in a stack but in the middle of the list), i do this:

$arr=array_chunk($arr,count($arr));
$arr=$arr[0];

the result is:

$arr[0]=1
$arr[1]=4
$arr[2]=6
$arr[3]=5

This can be applied mostly for tree sorting, when you only have the id and the parent values of the node, and you want to have N levels.
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0
teunkloosterman at hotmail dot com
9 years ago
Just to show how it sorts:

<?php
$array
= Array("1", "2", "3", "4", "5", "6", "7", "8", "9", "0", "a", "b", "c", "d", "e", "f", "g", "h", "i", "j", "k", "l", "m", "n", "o", "p", "q", "r", "s", "t", "u", "v", "w", "x", "y", "z", "A", "B", "C", "D", "E", "F", "G", "H", "I", "J", "K", "L", "M", "N", "O", "P", "Q", "R", "S", "T", "U", "V", "W", "X", "Y", "Z", " ", "!", "@", "#", "\\\$", "%", "^", "&", "*", "(", ")", "_", "-", "=", "+", "\\\\", "|", ",", "<", ".", ">", "?", "'", "\\\"", "`", "~");
sort($array);
echo
implode("", $array);
?>

returns:

 !"#$%&'()*+,-.0123456789<=>?
@ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
\^_`abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz|~

note: the result begins with a space
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-1
me[ at ]szczepan[ dot ]info
1 year ago
Sorting the keys, but keep the values in order is not possible by just ordering, because it would result in a new array. This is also the solution: Create a new array

<?php
$a
= array(9=>"a",8=>"c",5=>"d");

$keys = array_keys($a);
sort($keys);
$result = array_combine($keys, array_values($a));

//Result : array(5=>"a",8=>"c",9=>"d");
?>
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0
phpdotnetNO_SPAM at electronic-strategy dot com
12 years ago
/*
Small function to Alphabetically sort Multidimensional arrays by index values of an n dimension array.

I have only tested this for sorting an array of up to 6 dimensions by a value within the second dimension. This code is very rough and works for my purposes, but has not been tested beyond my needs.

Although a little clunky and not a mathematical type algorithm, it get's the job done. It theoretically overcomes many of the problems I have seen with multidimensional arrays in that it is possible to specify within the function, not by reference :-(, which index you wish to sort by, no matter how many dimensions down.

call function by assigning it to a new / existing array:

$row_array = multidimsort($row_array);
*/

function multidimsort($array_in) {
     $multiarray = array();
    $array_out = array();
    $loopvalue = 0;
   
    /* -1 as traversal of array starts from 0, count() starts from 1 */
    $multicount = count($array_in) - 1;

    /* add the indexes you wish to sort array by to a new array in this case index is two levels down, but shouldn't make a difference if it goes further indexes down. (Not tested!) */
    for($i = 0; $i <= $multicount; $i++) {
        array_push($multiarray, $array_in[$i][2]);
        //array_push($multiarray, $array_in[$i][2][4]);
        //array_push($multiarray, $array_in[$i][1][3][7]);
    }
   
    /* alphabetically sort the new array (Ascending in this case) can chage sort to whatever type you like. Even apply user-defined sort. */
    asort($multiarray);
   
    /* reset internal pointer to beginning of array after above sort */
    reset($multiarray);
   
    /* traverse new array of index values and add the corresponding element of the input array to the correct position in the output array */
    while (list ($key, $val) = each ($multiarray)) {
       
        $array_out[$loopvalue] = $array_in[$key];
       
        $loopvalue++;
    }

    /* return the output array which is all nicely sorted by the index you wanted! */
    return $array_out;
}
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0
peek at mailandnews dot com
13 years ago
I ran into the same problem with case insensitive sorting. Actually I think there should be a SORT_STRING_CASE flag but I tried the following:

usort($listing, 'strcasecmp');

This didn't work (why not?), but you can do a proper case insensitive sort like this:

usort($listing, create_function('$a,$b','return strcasecmp($a,$b);'));
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-1
alishahnovin at hotmail dot com
6 years ago
I had a multidimensional array, which needed to be sorted by one of the keys. This is what I came up with...

<?php
function msort($array, $id="id") {
       
$temp_array = array();
        while(
count($array)>0) {
           
$lowest_id = 0;
           
$index=0;
            foreach (
$array as $item) {
                if (
$item[$id]<$array[$lowest_id][$id]) {
                   
$lowest_id = $index;
                }
               
$index++;
            }
           
$temp_array[] = $array[$lowest_id];
           
$array = array_merge(array_slice($array, 0,$lowest_id), array_slice($array, $lowest_id+1));
        }
        return
$temp_array;
    }
?>

Ex:

<?php

//oh no, this is not in the ordered by id!!
$data[] = array("item"=>"item 4", "id"=>4);
$data[] = array("item"=>"item 1", "id"=>1);
$data[] = array("item"=>"item 3", "id"=>3);
$data[] = array("item"=>"item 2", "id"=>2);

var_dumpmsort($data)  ); //just msort it!

/* outputs

array
  0 =>
    array
      'item' => 'item 1' (length=6)
      'id' => 1
  1 =>
    array
      'item' => 'item 2' (length=6)
      'id' => 2
  2 =>
    array
      'item' => 'item 3' (length=6)
      'id' => 3
  3 =>
    array
      'item' => 'item 4' (length=6)
      'id' => 4

*/

?>
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-1
anthony at ectrolinux dot com
9 years ago
In a brief addition to the previous poster's message, the ascending sorting order used by PHP directly corresponds to ISO-8859-1 (ASCII). Therefore the character \48 (numeral 0) would be placed before the character \82 (R), which would be placed before the character \110 (n), and so forth.
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-2
Anonymous
4 years ago
[EDIT BY danbrown AT php DOT net: The code provided by this anonymous author contains bugfixes for and additions to code originally donated by "toenie" on 07-NOV-09.  The original author included the following note: "If you want to sort while using an 2 dimensional array, you can use this script I just wrote for myself. I thought it could be helpful for other people too."]

I also added the ability to sort in ascending and descending order.

$order = "ASC" will sort the array in ascending order
$order = "DESC" will sort the array in descending order

Here is the code:

<?php
   
function order_array_num ($array, $key, $order = "ASC")
    {
       
$tmp = array();
        foreach(
$array as $akey => $array2)
        {
           
$tmp[$akey] = $array2[$key];
        }
       
        if(
$order == "DESC")
        {
arsort($tmp , SORT_NUMERIC );}
        else
        {
asort($tmp , SORT_NUMERIC );}

       
$tmp2 = array();       
        foreach(
$tmp as $key => $value)
        {
           
$tmp2[$key] = $array[$key];
        }       
       
        return
$tmp2;
    }
?>
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