PHP 5.6.0beta1 released

usort

(PHP 4, PHP 5)

usortآرایه را با توجه به مقادیر با استفاده از تابع مقایسه تعریف شده توسط کاربر مرتب کن

Description

bool usort ( array &$array , callback $cmp_function )

این تابع آرایه را با توجه به مقادیر با استفاده از تابع مقایسه فراهم شده توسط کاربر مرتب خواهد نمود. اگر آرایه مورد نظر شما باید براساس یک معیار غیر بدیهی مرتب شود از این تابع باید استفاده کنید.

Note:

اگر دو عضو برابر با یکدیگر باشند، ترتیب آنها در آرایه مرتب شده نامشخص خواهد بود.

Note: This function assigns new keys to the elements in array. It will remove any existing keys that may have been assigned, rather than just reordering the keys.

Parameters

array

آرایه ورودی.

cmp_function

تابع مقایسه یک عدد صحیح کوچکتر، مساوی، یا بزرگتر از صفر بازمی‌گرداند اگر اولین آرگومان به ترتیب کوچک‌تر، مساوی با، یا بزرگتر از دومین آرگومان است.

Return Values

Returns TRUE on success or FALSE on failure.

Changelog

Version Description
4.1.0 یک الگوریتم جدید مرتب‌سازی معرفی شد. cmp_function ترتیب اصلی را برای اعضای مقایسه شده برابر حفظ نمی‌کند.

Examples

Example #1 مثال usort()

<?php
function cmp($a$b)
{
    if (
$a == $b) {
        return 
0;
    }
    return (
$a $b) ? -1;
}

$a = array(32561);

usort($a"cmp");

foreach (
$a as $key => $value) {
    echo 
"$key$value\n";
}
?>

The above example will output:

0: 1
1: 2
2: 3
3: 5
4: 6

Note:

مشخص است که در این حالت بدیهی تابع sort() مناسب‌تر خواهد بود.

Example #2 مثال usort() با استفاده از آرایه چندبعدی

<?php
function cmp($a$b)
{
    return 
strcmp($a["fruit"], $b["fruit"]);
}

$fruits[0]["fruit"] = "lemons";
$fruits[1]["fruit"] = "apples";
$fruits[2]["fruit"] = "grapes";

usort($fruits"cmp");

while (list(
$key$value) = each($fruits)) {
    echo 
"\$fruits[$key]: " $value["fruit"] . "\n";
}
?>

هنگام مرتب‌سازی آرایه چندبعدی، $a و $b ارجاع به اولین اندیس آرایه را نگه دارید.

The above example will output:

$fruits[0]: apples
$fruits[1]: grapes
$fruits[2]: lemons

Example #3 مثال usort() با استفاده از یک تابع عضو یک شی

<?php
class TestObj {
    var 
$name;

    function 
TestObj($name)
    {
        
$this->name $name;
    }

    
/* This is the static comparing function: */
    
static function cmp_obj($a$b)
    {
        
$al strtolower($a->name);
        
$bl strtolower($b->name);
        if (
$al == $bl) {
            return 
0;
        }
        return (
$al $bl) ? +: -1;
    }
}

$a[] = new TestObj("c");
$a[] = new TestObj("b");
$a[] = new TestObj("d");

usort($a, array("TestObj""cmp_obj"));

foreach (
$a as $item) {
    echo 
$item->name "\n";
}
?>

The above example will output:

b
c
d

See Also

add a note add a note

User Contributed Notes 56 notes

up
24
zuallauz at gmail dot com
2 years ago
When trying to do some custom sorting with objects and an anonymous function it wasn't entirely clear how this usort function works. I think it probably uses a quicksort in the background. Basically it actually moves the $b variable up or down in respect to the $a variable. It does NOT move the $a variable inside the callback function. This is key to getting your logic right in the comparisons.

If you return -1 that moves the $b variable down the array, return 1 moves $b up the array and return 0 keeps $b in the same place.

To test I cut down my code to sorting a simple array from highest priority to lowest.

<?php
$priorities
= array(5, 8, 3, 7, 3);

usort($priorities, function($a, $b)
{
    if (
$a == $b)
    {
        echo
"a ($a) is same priority as b ($b), keeping the same\n";
        return
0;
    }
    else if (
$a > $b)
    {
        echo
"a ($a) is higher priority than b ($b), moving b down array\n";
        return -
1;
    }
    else {
        echo
"b ($b) is higher priority than a ($a), moving b up array\n";               
        return
1;
    }
});

echo
"Sorted priorities:\n";
var_dump($priorities);
?>

Output:

b (8) is higher priority than a (3), moving b up array
b (5) is higher priority than a (3), moving b up array
b (7) is higher priority than a (3), moving b up array
a (3) is same priority as b (3), keeping the same
a (8) is higher priority than b (3), moving b down array
b (8) is higher priority than a (7), moving b up array
b (8) is higher priority than a (5), moving b up array
b (8) is higher priority than a (3), moving b up array
a (5) is higher priority than b (3), moving b down array
a (7) is higher priority than b (5), moving b down array

Sorted priorities:
array(5) {
  [0]=> int(8)
  [1]=> int(7)
  [2]=> int(5)
  [3]=> int(3)
  [4]=> int(3)
}
up
8
mkr at binarywerks dot dk
11 years ago
If you want to sort an array according to another array acting as a priority list, you can use this function.

<?php
function listcmp($a, $b)
{
  global
$order;

  foreach(
$order as $key => $value)
    {
      if(
$a==$value)
        {
          return
0;
          break;
        }

      if(
$b==$value)
        {
          return
1;
          break;
        }
    }
}

$order[0] = "first";
$order[1] = "second";
$order[2] = "third";

$array[0] = "second";
$array[1] = "first";
$array[2] = "third";
$array[3] = "fourth";
$array[4] = "second";
$array[5] = "first";
$array[6] = "second";

usort($array, "listcmp");

print_r($array);
?>
up
3
andi_mclean at ntlworld dot com
2 years ago
I needed a sort method that would sort strings but take note of any numbers and would compare them as number. I also want to ignore any non alphanumerical characters.

Eg.
Slot 1 Example
Slot 10 Example
Slot 2 Example

Should infact be
Slot 1 Example
Slot 2 Example
Slot 10 Example

<?php
function sort_with_numbers($a , $b) {
   
$a = explode(' ',$a);
   
$b = explode(' ',$b);
   
$size = min(count($a), count($b));
    for(
$index =0; $index < $size; ++$index) {
       
$a1 = ereg_replace("[^A-Za-z0-9]", "",$a[$index]);
       
$b1 = ereg_replace("[^A-Za-z0-9]", "",$b[$index]);
       
$equal = 0;
        if (
is_numeric($a1) && is_numeric($b1)) {
           
$equal = $a1 - $b1;
        } else {
           
$equal = strcasecmp($a1,$b1);
        }
        if (
$equal < 0) {
            return -
1;
        }
        if (
$equal > 0) {
            return
1;
        }
    }
    return
count($a) - count($b);   
}
?>
up
3
luke dot semerau at gmail dot com
5 years ago
If you need to use usort with a key in the calling method, I wrote this as a utility:
<?php

function usort_comparison($obj, $method, $key) {
   
$usorter = &new Usort($obj, $method, $key);
    return array(
$usorter, "sort");
}

class
Usort {
    function
__construct($obj, $method, $key) {
       
$this->obj = $obj;
       
$this->method = $method;
       
$this->key = $key;
    }
    function
sort($a, $b) {
        return
call_user_func_array(array($this->obj, $this->method), array($a, $b, $this->key));
    }
}

?>

<?php

require_once("util/usort.php");

class
Foo {
   
$items = array(FooBar(13), FooBar(2));
    public function
sorter() {
       
usort($this-items, usort_comparison("Foo", "_cmp", "item"));
    }

    public static function
_cmp($a, $b, $key) {
         return
strcasecmp($a->$key, $b->$key);
    }

}

class
FooBar {
    public
$item;
    function
__construct($val) {
       
$this->item = $val;
    }
}

?>

~ simple example... but in the way I need to use it was the key was used in a switch statement to choose the different member of the object to compare against dynamically (as in, sort by x or y or z)
up
9
sreid at sea-to-sky dot net
10 years ago
As the manual says, "If two members compare as equal, their order in the sorted array is undefined." This means that the sort used is not "stable" and may change the order of elements that compare equal.

Sometimes you really do need a stable sort. For example, if you sort a list by one field, then sort it again by another field, but don't want to lose the ordering from the previous field. In that case it is better to use usort with a comparison function that takes both fields into account, but if you can't do that then use the function below. It is a merge sort, which is guaranteed O(n*log(n)) complexity, which means it stays reasonably fast even when you use larger lists (unlike bubblesort and insertion sort, which are O(n^2)).

<?php
function mergesort(&$array, $cmp_function = 'strcmp') {
   
// Arrays of size < 2 require no action.
   
if (count($array) < 2) return;
   
// Split the array in half
   
$halfway = count($array) / 2;
   
$array1 = array_slice($array, 0, $halfway);
   
$array2 = array_slice($array, $halfway);
   
// Recurse to sort the two halves
   
mergesort($array1, $cmp_function);
   
mergesort($array2, $cmp_function);
   
// If all of $array1 is <= all of $array2, just append them.
   
if (call_user_func($cmp_function, end($array1), $array2[0]) < 1) {
       
$array = array_merge($array1, $array2);
        return;
    }
   
// Merge the two sorted arrays into a single sorted array
   
$array = array();
   
$ptr1 = $ptr2 = 0;
    while (
$ptr1 < count($array1) && $ptr2 < count($array2)) {
        if (
call_user_func($cmp_function, $array1[$ptr1], $array2[$ptr2]) < 1) {
           
$array[] = $array1[$ptr1++];
        }
        else {
           
$array[] = $array2[$ptr2++];
        }
    }
   
// Merge the remainder
   
while ($ptr1 < count($array1)) $array[] = $array1[$ptr1++];
    while (
$ptr2 < count($array2)) $array[] = $array2[$ptr2++];
    return;
}
?>
up
3
drorasta
5 years ago
Here's how you can usort() a multidimensional array (like in example #2 above) within a class:

<?php usort($myArray, array("className", "cmp")); ?>
up
3
svenxy AT nospam gmx net
7 years ago
This will sort subnets correctly:

<?php

$zones
=
array(
'192.168.11',
'192.169.12',
'192.168.13',
'192.167.14',
'192.168.15',
'122.168.16',
'192.168.17'
);

function
sort_subnets ($a, $b) {
   
$a_arr = explode('.', $a);
   
$b_arr = explode('.', $b);
    foreach (
range(0,3) as $i) {
        if (
$a_arr[$i] < $b_arr[$i] ) {
            return -
1;
        }
        elseif (
$a_arr[$i] > $b_arr[$i] ) {
            return
1;
        }
    }
    return -
1;
}

usort($zones, 'sort_subnets');
print
'<pre>';
print_r($zones);
print
'</pre>';

?>
up
3
josh at wintelcom dot net
12 years ago
This lets you sort an associative multi-dimensional array by multiple key/field names.  Much similiar to the SQL clause ORDER BY.  Enjoy.

<?php
function cmp ($a, $b) {

   
// Populate this array with your values...
    // Below is the SQL equivalent of
    // select * from blah ORDER BY date desc, type asc, name asc

   
$vals = array(
       
'date' => 'd',
       
'type' => 'a',
       
'name' => 'a'
   
);

    while(list(
$key, $val) = each($vals)) {

        if(
$val == "d") {
            if (
$a["$key"] > $b["$key"]) {
                return -
1;
            }
            if (
$a["$key"] < $b["$key"]) {
                return
1;
            }
        }

        if(
$val == "a") {
            if (
$a["$key"] < $b["$key"]) {
                return -
1;
            }
            if(
$a["$key"] > $b["$key"]) {
                return
1;
            }
        }

    }

}
?>
up
6
Gok6tm
2 years ago
this is a new multisort function for sorting on multiple subfield like it will be in sql : 'ORDER BY field1, field2'
number of sort field is undefined
<?php

$array
[] = array('soc' => 3, 'code'=>1);
$array[] = array('soc' => 2, 'code'=>1);
$array[] = array('soc' => 1, 'code'=>1);
$array[] = array('soc' => 1, 'code'=>1);
$array[] = array('soc' => 2, 'code'=>5);
$array[] = array('soc' => 1, 'code'=>2);
$array[] = array('soc' => 3, 'code'=>2);

//usage
print_r(multiSort($array, 'soc', 'code'));

function
multiSort() {
   
//get args of the function
   
$args = func_get_args();
   
$c = count($args);
    if (
$c < 2) {
        return
false;
    }
   
//get the array to sort
   
$array = array_splice($args, 0, 1);
   
$array = $array[0];
   
//sort with an anoymous function using args
   
usort($array, function($a, $b) use($args) {

       
$i = 0;
       
$c = count($args);
       
$cmp = 0;
        while(
$cmp == 0 && $i < $c)
        {
           
$cmp = strcmp($a[ $args[ $i ] ], $b[ $args[ $i ] ]);
           
$i++;
        }

        return
$cmp;

    });

    return
$array;

}
?>

output:
Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [soc] => 1
            [code] => 1
        )

    [1] => Array
        (
            [soc] => 1
            [code] => 1
        )

    [2] => Array
        (
            [soc] => 1
            [code] => 2
        )

    [3] => Array
        (
            [soc] => 2
            [code] => 1
        )

    [4] => Array
        (
            [soc] => 2
            [code] => 5
        )

    [5] => Array
        (
            [soc] => 3
            [code] => 1
        )

    [6] => Array
        (
            [soc] => 3
            [code] => 2
        )

)
up
3
Sid_M
6 years ago
The sample function for having the sort function be a class method has a comment identifying the sorting function as static, however the function does not have the static keyword. In PHP 5 (at least as configured on my server), usort will fail, identifying the method as non-static. Preceding the function keyword with the static keyword fixed the problem.
up
2
admin at gosenz dot com
2 years ago
sort multi-dimentional arrays in class with usort

<?php
class ArraySort
{
    private
$arr = array();

    public function
__construct($arr)
    {
       
$this->arr = $arr;
    }

    public function
doSort()
    {
       
$cmp = function($a, $b)
        {
           
//Do Some Comparation
       
}
        if(
is_array($this->arr))
        {
           
usort($this->arr, $cmp);
        }
        return
$this->arr;
    }
}
?>
up
2
gmail.com - nmcquay
5 years ago
I wrote a wrapper for usort that lets you use something similar to an SQL ORDER BY clause. It can sort arrays of associative arrays and arrays of objects and I think it would work with some hybrid case.

Example of how the function works:

<?php
$testAry
= array(
  array(
'a' => 1, 'b' => 2, 'c' => 3),
  array(
'a' => 2, 'b' => 1, 'c' => 3),
  array(
'a' => 3, 'b' => 2, 'c' => 1),
  array(
'a' => 1, 'b' => 3, 'c' => 2),
  array(
'a' => 2, 'b' => 3, 'c' => 1),
  array(
'a' => 3, 'b' => 1, 'c' => 2)
);

Utility::orderBy($testAry, 'a ASC, b DESC');

//Result:
$testAry = array(
  array(
'a' => 1, 'b' => 3, 'c' => 2),
  array(
'a' => 1, 'b' => 2, 'c' => 3),
  array(
'a' => 2, 'b' => 3, 'c' => 1),
  array(
'a' => 2, 'b' => 1, 'c' => 3),
  array(
'a' => 3, 'b' => 2, 'c' => 1),
  array(
'a' => 3, 'b' => 1, 'c' => 2)
);
?>

To sort an array of objects you would do something like:
Utility::orderBy($objectAry, 'getCreationDate() DESC, getSubOrder() ASC');

This would sort an array of objects that have methods getCreationDate() and getSubOrder().

Here is the function:

<?php
class Utility {
   
/*
    * @param array $ary the array we want to sort
    * @param string $clause a string specifying how to sort the array similar to SQL ORDER BY clause
    * @param bool $ascending that default sorts fall back to when no direction is specified
    * @return null
    */
   
public static function orderBy(&$ary, $clause, $ascending = true) {
       
$clause = str_ireplace('order by', '', $clause);
       
$clause = preg_replace('/\s+/', ' ', $clause);
       
$keys = explode(',', $clause);
       
$dirMap = array('desc' => 1, 'asc' => -1);
       
$def = $ascending ? -1 : 1;

       
$keyAry = array();
       
$dirAry = array();
        foreach(
$keys as $key) {
           
$key = explode(' ', trim($key));
           
$keyAry[] = trim($key[0]);
            if(isset(
$key[1])) {
               
$dir = strtolower(trim($key[1]));
               
$dirAry[] = $dirMap[$dir] ? $dirMap[$dir] : $def;
            } else {
               
$dirAry[] = $def;
            }
        }

       
$fnBody = '';
        for(
$i = count($keyAry) - 1; $i >= 0; $i--) {
           
$k = $keyAry[$i];
           
$t = $dirAry[$i];
           
$f = -1 * $t;
           
$aStr = '$a[\''.$k.'\']';
           
$bStr = '$b[\''.$k.'\']';
            if(
strpos($k, '(') !== false) {
               
$aStr = '$a->'.$k;
               
$bStr = '$b->'.$k;
            }

            if(
$fnBody == '') {
               
$fnBody .= "if({$aStr} == {$bStr}) { return 0; }\n";
               
$fnBody .= "return ({$aStr} < {$bStr}) ? {$t} : {$f};\n";               
            } else {
               
$fnBody = "if({$aStr} == {$bStr}) {\n" . $fnBody;
               
$fnBody .= "}\n";
               
$fnBody .= "return ({$aStr} < {$bStr}) ? {$t} : {$f};\n";
            }
        }

        if(
$fnBody) {
           
$sortFn = create_function('$a,$b', $fnBody);
           
usort($ary, $sortFn);       
        }
    }
}
?>
up
2
webmaster at zeroweb dot org
10 years ago
Needed a quick, fairly uncluttered way of sorting an array of objects by a certain object attribute, so here's what I came up with. Uses one global array and usort(). Also accepts an optional sort direction argument (CSORT_ASC = sort ascending, CSORT_DESC = sort descending). Use it like this:

(assuming $myarray is your array, "index" is the attribute you want to sort by, and you want to sort in descending order)

      csort($myarray, "index", CSORT_DESC);

Hope this is of use to someone. Probably a better way to pull this off, but this works alright.

<?php
define
("CSORT_ASC",     1);
define("CSORT_DESC",     -1);

function
csort_cmp(&$a, &$b)
{
    global
$csort_cmp;

    if (
$a->$csort_cmp['key'] > $b->$csort_cmp['key'])
        return
$csort_cmp['direction'];

    if (
$a->$csort_cmp['key'] < $b->$csort_cmp['key'])
        return -
1 * $csort_cmp['direction'];

    return
0;
}

function
csort(&$a, $k, $sort_direction=CSORT_ASC)
{
    global
$csort_cmp;

   
$csort_cmp = array(
       
'key'           => $k,
       
'direction'     => $sort_direction
   
);

   
usort($a, "csort_cmp");

    unset(
$csort_cmp);
}
?>
up
2
alex at netflex dot nl
11 years ago
This function will sort on more then one values, test and have fun

<pre>
<?php

  $array
[0]['name'] = "a";
 
$array[0]['id'] = 3;

 
$array[1]['name'] = "a";
 
$array[1]['id'] = 2;

 
$array[2]['name'] = "a";
 
$array[2]['id'] = 5;

 
$array[3]['name'] = "b";
 
$array[3]['id'] = 8;

 
$array[4]['name'] = "b";
 
$array[4]['id'] = 1;

 
$array[5]['name'] = "b";
 
$array[5]['id'] = 0;

 
$array[6]['name'] = "c";
 
$array[6]['id'] = 5;

 
$array[7]['name'] = "c";
 
$array[7]['id'] = 7;

 
$array[8]['name'] = "c";
 
$array[8]['id'] = 3;

 
print_r($array);

 
$sort_array[0]['name'] = "name";
 
$sort_array[0]['sort'] = "ASC";
 
$sort_array[0]['case'] = TRUE;

 
$sort_array[1]['name'] = "id";
 
$sort_array[1]['case'] = FALSE;

 
sortx($array, $sort_array);

 
print_r($array);

  function
sortx(&$array, $sort = array()) {
   
$function = '';
    while (list(
$key) = each($sort)) {
      if (isset(
$sort[$key]['case'])&&($sort[$key]['case'] == TRUE)) {
       
$function .= 'if (strtolower($a["' . $sort[$key]['name'] . '"])<>strtolower($b["' . $sort[$key]['name'] . '"])) { return (strtolower($a["' . $sort[$key]['name'] . '"]) ';
      } else {
       
$function .= 'if ($a["' . $sort[$key]['name'] . '"]<>$b["' . $sort[$key]['name'] . '"]) { return ($a["' . $sort[$key]['name'] . '"] ';
      }
      if (isset(
$sort[$key]['sort'])&&($sort[$key]['sort'] == "DESC")) {
       
$function .= '<';
      } else {
       
$function .= '>';
      }
      if (isset(
$sort[$key]['case'])&&($sort[$key]['case'] == TRUE)) {
       
$function .= ' strtolower($b["' . $sort[$key]['name'] . '"])) ? 1 : -1; } else';
      } else {
       
$function .= ' $b["' . $sort[$key]['name'] . '"]) ? 1 : -1; } else';
      }
    }
   
$function .= ' { return 0; }';
   
usort($array, create_function('$a, $b', $function));
  }

?>
</pre>
up
1
bcsj
2 years ago
Sorting a multidimensional array by a subkey seem to be one of the bigger challenges when using usort. At least if one want the key to be dynamic. For anyone interested this code seemed to work rather well for me:

<?php

usort
($array,array(new cmp($key), "cmp__"));

class
cmp {
    var
$key;
    function
__construct($key) {
       
$this->key = $key;
    }
   
    function
cmp__($a,$b) {
       
$key = $this->key;
        if (
$a[$key] == $b[$key]) return 0;
        return ((
$a[$key] > $b[$key]) ? 1 : -1);
    }
}

?>
up
1
dmhouse at gmail dot com
8 years ago
The easiest way to compare two integers is just to take the second away from the first. For example, say you wanted to sort by an integer property of an object. Your comparison function would look like this:

<?php
function compare_counts($a, $b) {
  return
$a->count - $b->count;
}
?>

This works because you don't necessarily have to return -1, 0 or 1, the manual states any integer less than, equal to or greater than 0 is OK.
up
1
guenther dot stadler at gmx dot net
9 years ago
Just something i stumbled about right now:
If the array consists of just one elemtent, the user-function is not called at all.

Although this surely makes sense, think of it if you want to use your order-function for adding extra data to your arrays...
up
1
xaguilars at gmail dot com
3 years ago
I'd like to share with the community my function for sorting an array of arrays or objects containing associative data. This could be used, for example, with a MySQL result.

<?php
function sort_by($field, &$arr, $sorting=SORT_ASC, $case_insensitive=true){
    if(
is_array($arr) && (count($arr)>0) && ( ( is_array($arr[0]) && isset($arr[0][$field]) ) || ( is_object($arr[0]) && isset($arr[0]->$field) ) ) ){
        if(
$case_insensitive==true) $strcmp_fn = "strnatcasecmp";
        else
$strcmp_fn = "strnatcmp";

        if(
$sorting==SORT_ASC){
           
$fn = create_function('$a,$b', '
                if(is_object($a) && is_object($b)){
                    return '
.$strcmp_fn.'($a->'.$field.', $b->'.$field.');
                }else if(is_array($a) && is_array($b)){
                    return '
.$strcmp_fn.'($a["'.$field.'"], $b["'.$field.'"]);
                }else return 0;
            '
);
        }else{
           
$fn = create_function('$a,$b', '
                if(is_object($a) && is_object($b)){
                    return '
.$strcmp_fn.'($b->'.$field.', $a->'.$field.');
                }else if(is_array($a) && is_array($b)){
                    return '
.$strcmp_fn.'($b["'.$field.'"], $a["'.$field.'"]);
                }else return 0;
            '
);
        }
       
usort($arr, $fn);
        return
true;
    }else{
        return
false;
    }
}
?>
up
1
Anonymous
5 years ago
To sort reliably on more than one "column" in database-style arrays, handle this within your cmp function where the first field to be sorted returns 0:

<?php

function cmp($a, $b){
   
 if(
$a[field_1] == $b[field_1]){

  if(
$a[field_2] == $b[field_2]){

   return
0;

  }

  elseif(
$a[field_2] > $b[field_2]){

   return -
1;

  }

  elseif(
$a[field_2] < $b[field_2]){

   return
1;

  }

 }

 elseif(
$a[field_1] > $b[field_1]){

  return -
1;

 }

 elseif(
$a[field_1] < $b[field_1]){

  return
1;

 }

}

?>

Sorting by doing multiple passes does not seem to be reliable.
up
1
jalil at measat dot org
5 years ago
<?php
/*---------------------------------------------------------
* my own home made easy object sort, which
* i cannot find anywhere on the net
* at all, tut. i can find only complicated ones,
* which brings me a headache.
*
* You can enhance it to return all sorts of error
* conditions if you wish,
* i need nothing but a false return upon failure to sort,
* so that is the only error i have here
*
* Example usage:
*
* INPUT                 -       $objects_array
// an array of objects for sorting

* PARAMETERS    -       property
// the property of the object to be sorted

* OUTPUT                -       $engine
// an engine object created by new,
// with your arrays of objects sorted according to your
// selected property
//( the sorting is done upon sort object creation )
*
* Code Examples
*
* $engine = new objSorter($objects_array);
// sorts on FIRST property -  default

* $engine = new objSorter($objects_array,'property');
// sort on ANY specific property
*--------------------------------------------------------*/

class objSorter
{
var
$property;
var
$sorted;

    function
ObjSorter($objects_array,$property=null)
        {
           
$sample    = $objects_array[0];
           
$vars    = get_object_vars($sample);

        if (isset(
$property))
            {
            if (isset(
$sample->$property))
// make sure requested property is correct for the object
               
{   
               
$this->property = $property;
               
usort($objects_array, array($this,'_compare'));
                }
            else
                {   
               
$this->sorted    = false;
                return;   
                }
            }
        else
            {   
                list(
$property,$var)     = each($sample);
               
$this->property         = $property;
               
usort($objects_array, array($this,'_compare'));
            }

       
$this->sorted    = ($objects_array);
        }

    function
_compare($apple, $orange)
        {
       
$property    = $this->property;
        if (
$apple->$property == $orange->$property) return 0;
        return (
$apple->$property < $orange->$property) ? -1 : 1;
        }
}
// end class
?>

USAGE EXAMPLE
DUMP ORIGINAL
user Object ( [name] => Yunihe Jopoba [age] => 27 [richness] => € 899,970 )
user Object ( [name] => Janirevi Fakejorumoa [age] => 19 [richness] => € 219,078 )
user Object ( [name] => Korejowi Mezede [age] => 95 [richness] => € 3,272 )
user Object ( [name] => Nugoaivu Jongyi [age] => 84 [richness] => € 94,853 )
user Object ( [name] => Cepomase Buaesukoyua [age] => 32 [richness] => € 677,180 )
user Object ( [name] => Vejosehona Auva [age] => 20 [richness] => € 144,540 )
user Object ( [name] => Fewame Wojuvuzo [age] => 69 [richness] => € 198,231 )
user Object ( [name] => Risuku Zagedobu [age] => 48 [richness] => € 763,860 )
user Object ( [name] => Fazurada Aayu [age] => 16 [richness] => € 302,352 )

SORTED by age

<?php
$objects               
= new ObjSorter($objects_array,'age');
if (
$objects->sorted)
{
$objects_array  = $objects->sorted;
foreach (
$objects_array as $key=>$object) { print_r($object); echo "<br />"; }
}
?>

user Object ( [name] => Fazurada Aayu [age] => 16 [richness] => € 302,352 )
user Object ( [name] => Janirevi Fakejorumoa [age] => 19 [richness] => € 219,078 )
user Object ( [name] => Vejosehona Auva [age] => 20 [richness] => € 144,540 )
user Object ( [name] => Yunihe Jopoba [age] => 27 [richness] => € 899,970 )
user Object ( [name] => Cepomase Buaesukoyua [age] => 32 [richness] => € 677,180 )
user Object ( [name] => Risuku Zagedobu [age] => 48 [richness] => € 763,860 )
user Object ( [name] => Fewame Wojuvuzo [age] => 69 [richness] => € 198,231 )
user Object ( [name] => Nugoaivu Jongyi [age] => 84 [richness] => € 94,853 )
user Object ( [name] => Korejowi Mezede [age] => 95 [richness] => € 3,272 )

SORTED by richness

<?php
$objects               
= new ObjSorter($objects_array,'richness');
if (
$objects->sorted)
{
$objects_array  = $objects->sorted;
foreach (
$objects_array as $key=>$object) { print_r($object); echo "<br />"; }
}
?>

user Object ( [name] => Vejosehona Auva [age] => 20 [richness] => € 144,540 )
user Object ( [name] => Fewame Wojuvuzo [age] => 69 [richness] => € 198,231 )
user Object ( [name] => Janirevi Fakejorumoa [age] => 19 [richness] => € 219,078 )
user Object ( [name] => Korejowi Mezede [age] => 95 [richness] => € 3,272 )
user Object ( [name] => Fazurada Aayu [age] => 16 [richness] => € 302,352 )
user Object ( [name] => Cepomase Buaesukoyua [age] => 32 [richness] => € 677,180 )
user Object ( [name] => Risuku Zagedobu [age] => 48 [richness] => € 763,860 )
user Object ( [name] => Yunihe Jopoba [age] => 27 [richness] => € 899,970 )
user Object ( [name] => Nugoaivu Jongyi [age] => 84 [richness] => € 94,853 )

Simulated wrong property request ( dumb property )

<?php
$objects               
= new ObjSorter($objects_array,'dumb property');
if (
$objects->sorted)
{
$objects_array  = $objects->sorted;
foreach (
$objects_array as $key=>$object) { print_r($object); echo "<br />"; }
}
else echo
'DUMB ERROR';
?>

DUMB ERROR
up
1
steveNO_SPAM at AXE_MEcontentwatch dot com
11 years ago
The sort functions do nothing if identical keys exist.  Of course, you shouldn't have identical keys anyway, but this just might save someone else the oodles of time it took me to figure out while using multi-dimentional arrays:

<?php
class myArticleList {
// ... //
 
function &getList () {

   
// works
       
$a = array (
                  
"articleList1" => array ( "2", "3" ),
                  
"articleList2" => array ( "3" , "4")
                 );
   
usort( $a, array( $this, "compareByTitle") );
     
   
// doesn't work
       
$b = array (
                  
"articleList" => array ( "2", "3" ),
                  
"articleList" => array ( "3" , "4")
                 );
   
usort( $b, array( $this, "compareByTitle") );
  }

  function
compareByTitle( $a, $b ) {
 
// ... //
 
}
}
?>
up
2
fmaz008 at gmail dot com
3 years ago
This comment is just to help backward compatibility.

I needed to have a foreach loop using reference just before using the usort function on the same array that was used in the foreach.

Like this:
<?php
public function sortByTitle()
{
        if(empty(
$this->_arrSubCat))
            return
false;
       
        foreach(
$this->_arrSubCat as &$cat)
           
$cat->sortByTitle();
       
       
usort($this->_arrSubCat, 'strcasecmp');
}
?>

I had this strange bug where the last object of the $this->_arrSubCat array before the sort was alway replaced/overwrited with his string value.

On my machine (PHP 5.3), I had no problem, but when I placed the code on another server, my code crashed with a fatal error (Because I was using a string as an object later in the code)

The solution I found is really simple, and avoid the array to have a reference declared in memory while running the sort function. Just add an unset($cat):

<?php
public function sortByTitle()
{
        if(empty(
$this->_arrSubCat))
            return
false;
       
        foreach(
$this->_arrSubCat as &$cat)
           
$cat->sortByTitle();
       
        unset(
$cat); //No more problem because of the foreach &cat reference.   
       
usort($this->_arrSubCat, 'strcasecmp');
}
?>

It took me an hour an a half to locate the bug, hope it will save someone some time !
up
2
Will Shaver
4 years ago
An even better implementation of osort [than my original, posted on 24-AUG-09 (since deleted)], allowing for multiple properties and directions.  With php 5.3.0 sorting by properties of an object becomes MUCH simpler.  Note that this uses anonymous functions / closures. Might find reviewing the php docs on that useful.  Look below for examples for previous version of php.

<?php
function osort(&$array, $props)
{
    if(!
is_array($props))
       
$props = array($props => true);
       
   
usort($array, function($a, $b) use ($props) {
        foreach(
$props as $prop => $ascending)
        {
            if(
$a->$prop != $b->$prop)
            {
                if(
$ascending)
                    return
$a->$prop > $b->$prop ? 1 : -1;
                else
                    return
$b->$prop > $a->$prop ? 1 : -1;
            }
        }
        return -
1; //if all props equal       
   
});   
}
?>

Usage:

<?php
osort
($items, array("Color" => true, "Size" => false));
//or
osort($items, "Color");
?>
up
2
maarten at xel dot nl
4 years ago
If you ever have to sort a collection of objects on something like a string (name) present in every object, but want to keep the array of objects intact you might find this useful:

<?php
function naturalSortObjectArray($objectArray) {
        function
naturalSortByName($a, $b) {
            return
strnatcmp($a->name, $b->name);
        }
       
usort($objectArray, "naturalSortByName");
        return
$objectArray;
}
?>
up
2
huskyr at gmail dot com
4 years ago
Remember that functions inside of functions will become part of the global scope too. So, something like:

<?php
   
function foo($array) {
        function
compare($a,$b) {
            return
$a < $b;
        }
       
usort($array, "compare");
        return
$array;
    }
   
    function
bar($array) {
        function
compare($a,$b) {
            return
$a > $b;
        }
       
usort($array, "compare");
        return
$array;
    }
   
   
foo($something);
   
bar($something_else);
?>
       
Will result in a fatal error because you're redeclaring 'compare'. This could be a little strange, e.g. for JavaScript programmers who expect functions in functions to become private outside of the parent scope.
up
2
Ariz Jacinto
5 years ago
Here's how to use usort() within a class using a static function as a callback (using the example above):

<?php

class MyObj {
    var
$name;

    function
SampleObj($name){
       
$this->name = $name;

       
usort($this->name, array(&$this, "compareValues"));

    }

    static function
compareValues($a, $b){
       
$al = strtolower($a->name);
       
$bl = strtolower($b->name);
        if (
$al == $bl) {
            return
0;
        }
        return (
$al > $bl) ? +1 : -1;
    }
}

?>
up
1
Gerald Schneider
4 months ago
usort returns null when the sorting function is not (yet) defined. The function has to be defined before usort is called, afterwards doesn't work.
up
1
Hayley Watson
1 year ago
As the documentation says, the comparison function needs to return an integer that is either "less than, equal to, or greater than zero". There is no requirement to restrict the value returned to -1, 0, 1.

<?php
usort
($array, function($a, $b) {
    if(
$a->integer_property > $b->integer_property) {
        return
1;
    }
    elseif(
$a->integer_property < $b->integer_property) {
        return -
1;
    }
    else {
        return
0;
    }
});
?>

can be simplified to

<?php
usort
($array, function($a, $b) {
    return
$a->integer_property - $b->integer_property;
});
?>

This of course applies to any comparison function that calculates an integer "score" for each of its arguments to decide which is "greater".
up
2
Jeremy Swinborne
8 years ago
When I query a DB I usually put my record set inside of a multi-dimentional array.  I finally wrote a program that will allow you to sort your record set by column after you put it in an array.

<?php
$test
= array();
$test[0]['name'] = 'jeremy';
$test[0]['email'] = 'lala@example.com';
$test[0]['phone'] = '123-123-1234';
$test[0]['trick'] = 'mezopia';

$test[1]['name'] = 'Amanda';
$test[1]['email'] = 'hot@example.com';
$test[1]['phone'] = '123-123-1235';
$test[1]['trick'] = 'youarecool';

$test[2]['name'] = 'john';
$test[2]['email'] = 'wowee@example.com';
$test[2]['phone'] = '123-123-3333';
$test[2]['trick'] = 'goneinanhour';

print_r(columnSort($test, 'name'));

function
columnSort($unsorted, $column) {
   
$sorted = $unsorted;
    for (
$i=0; $i < sizeof($sorted)-1; $i++) {
      for (
$j=0; $j<sizeof($sorted)-1-$i; $j++)
        if (
$sorted[$j][$column] > $sorted[$j+1][$column]) {
         
$tmp = $sorted[$j];
         
$sorted[$j] = $sorted[$j+1];
         
$sorted[$j+1] = $tmp;
      }
    }
    return
$sorted;
}
?>
up
1
Lea Hayes
2 years ago
<?php
/**
 * Sort array of objects by field.
 *
 * @param array $objects Array of objects to sort.
 * @param string $on Name of field.
 * @param string $order (ASC|DESC)
 */
function sort_on_field(&$objects, $on, $order = 'ASC') {
   
$comparer = ($order === 'DESC')
        ?
"return -strcmp(\$a->{$on},\$b->{$on});"
       
: "return strcmp(\$a->{$on},\$b->{$on});";
   
usort($objects, create_function('$a,$b', $comparer));
}
?>
up
2
Raveler at telenet dot be
9 years ago
The array_alternate_multisort function written by robert below doesn't work. There are several bugs in the code and it doesn't work when sorting by multiple keys because the order of the first key isn't taken into account when sorting by the second key and so on. Also, because robert uses strcasecmp the algorithm doesn't work properly with floats or other variable types. Here's the improved version:

<?php
   
function SortArray() {
       
$arguments = func_get_args();
       
$array = $arguments[0];
       
$code = '';
        for (
$c = 1; $c < count($arguments); $c += 2) {
            if (
in_array($arguments[$c + 1], array("ASC", "DESC"))) {
               
$code .= 'if ($a["'.$arguments[$c].'"] != $b["'.$arguments[$c].'"]) {';
                if (
$arguments[$c + 1] == "ASC") {
                   
$code .= 'return ($a["'.$arguments[$c].'"] < $b["'.$arguments[$c].'"] ? -1 : 1); }';
                }
                else {
                   
$code .= 'return ($a["'.$arguments[$c].'"] < $b["'.$arguments[$c].'"] ? 1 : -1); }';
                }
            }
        }
       
$code .= 'return 0;';
       
$compare = create_function('$a,$b', $code);
       
usort($array, $compare);
        return
$array;
    }
?>
up
1
phil at lavin dot me dot uk
3 years ago
strcmp (or strcasecmp) can be used as a callback function for usort. It will cast your comparison values to string. Thus, you can implement a __toString() method into your classes and use usort without creating a callback function:

<?php
class Foo {
   private
$a;
   private
$b;

   public function
__construct($a, $b) {
     
$this->a = $a;
     
$this->b = $b;
   }

   public function
__toString() {
      return (string)
$this->a;
   }
}

$foo = array(new Foo('t', 'b'), new Foo('a', 'c'), new Foo('g', 'd'));

print_r($foo);

usort($foo, 'strcasecmp');

print_r($foo);
?>
up
2
prozac at iguanasoft dot com
11 years ago
Here is a simple example of converting a timestamp date("U") into a date. This sorts by that day and then by string value alphabetically.

I hope it saves someone some time... Happy PHP'in!

<?php
//data to sort
$shared[0]["page_id"] = "2025731470";
$shared[1]["page_id"] = "2025731450";
$shared[2]["page_id"] = "1025731456";
$shared[3]["page_id"] = "1025731460";
$shared[0]["username"] = "larry";
$shared[1]["username"] = "alvin";
$shared[2]["username"] = "garth";
$shared[3]["username"] = "harvy";

//function to convert timestamp to date
function convert_timestamp($timestamp){
   
$limit=date("U");
   
$limiting=$timestamp-$limit;
    return
date ("Ymd", mktime (0,0,$limiting));
}
//comparison function
function cmp ($a, $b) {
   
$l=convert_timestamp($a["page_id"]);
   
$k=convert_timestamp($b["page_id"]);
    if(
$k==$l){
        return
strcmp($a["username"], $b["username"]);
    }else{
        return
strcmp($k, $l);
    }
}

//sort array
usort($shared, "cmp");

//display sorted info
while (list ($key, $value) = each ($shared)) {
    echo
"\$shared[$key]: ";
    echo
$value["page_id"];
    echo
" username: ";
    echo
$value["username"];
    echo
"<break_tag>";
}
?>

This will output:
$shared[0]: 2025731450   username: alvin
$shared[1]: 2025731470   username: larry
$shared[2]: 1025731456   username: garth
$shared[3]: 1025731460   username: harvy
up
2
franky at iname dot com
12 years ago
For sort multi-array by specific index

<?php
function cmp ($a, $b)
{  
 global
$w_o;
 if (
$a[$w_o] == $b[$w_o]) return 0;
 return (
$a[$w_o] < $b[$w_o]) ? -1 : 1;
}
# the index is the second element of
# each row

$w_o =1;
usort($my_arry_info,"cmp");
?>
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2
derek at luddite dot net
13 years ago
Needed a date sort and I didn't know if one was available so I wrote one. Maybe it'll help someone:

<?php
function DateSort($a,$b,$d="-") {
    if (
$a == $b) {
        return
0;
    } else { 
//Convert into dates and compare
       
list($am,$ad,$ay)=split($d,$a);
        list(
$bm,$bd,$by)=split($d,$b);
        if (
mktime(0,0,0,$am,$ad,$ay) < mktime(0,0,0,$bm,$bd,$by)) {
            return -
1;
        } else {
            return
1;
        }
    }
}
?>

$d is the delimeter
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1
Tim
7 years ago
If you want to sort an array of strings by the length of its values, you can write a better cmp-function than manually comparing string lengths with if-statements. Unfortunately, I see this bad technique in other people's code. I prefer using this:

<?php
function length_cmp( $a, $b ) {
    return
strlen($a)-strlen($b) ;
}
?>

This function sorts the array in ascending order. If you want to sort descending, simply swap $a and $b either in the parameters or in the subtraction.

-Tim
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0
me at perochak dot com
8 months ago
If you want to sort the time based array, then this will be helpfull.

function timesort($array){
            usort($array, function($a, $b)
            {
                $a=strtotime($a);
                $b=strtotime($b);
               
                if ($a == $b)
                {
                    return 0;
                }
                else if ($a < $b)
                {
                    return -1;
                }
                else {
                    return 1;
                }
            });
}

Input:

$time_array=Array
(
    [1] => 10:00AM
    [2] => 09:00AM
    [3] => 02:00PM
    [4] => 11:00AM
)

Output:
print_r(timesort($time_array));
Array
(
    [0] => 09:00AM
    [1] => 10:00AM
    [2] => 11:00AM
    [3] => 02:00PM
)
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0
hexarobi at gmail dot com
1 year ago
Needed to sort an array of objects based on multiple properties. (ie: Group, then Last Name, then First Name) Doing this in multiple usorts fails because the second usort ends up shuffling the results of the previous usort because order is undefined when criteria are equal. Ended up writing a function that builds a comparison operator by nesting ternary operators for each field, then using that function in usort(). Hopefully it's of use to someone else.

<?php
/*
 * Sorts an array of objects by a list of properties.
 * Each property can have the following options:
 *   'property' can be either a public variable or a method().
 *   'order' can be ASC or DESC
 *   'comparer' can be string, number, or date
 *
 * Example:
 * sortObjectsByProperties($objects, array(
 *       array('property'=>'getPrice()', order=>'ASC', 'comparer'=>'number'),
 *       array('property'=>'getName()', order=>'DESC', 'comparer'=>'string'),
 *       array('property'=>'created_date', order=>'ASC', 'comparer'=>'date'),
 *       array('property'=>'id', order=>'ASC', 'comparer'=>'number'),
 *   ));
 *
 * @author Tyler Chamberlain
 */
function sortObjectsByProperties(&$objects, $fields) {
       
$comparerFunctionString = "";
        foreach (
$fields as $field) {
            if (
$field['comparer'] == 'number') {
               
$comparerFunction = "(\$a->{$field['property']} == \$b->{$field['property']} ? 0 : (\$a->{$field['property']} > \$b->{$field['property']} ? 1 : -1))";
            } elseif (
$field['comparer'] == 'date') {
               
$comparerFunction = "(strtotime(\$a->{$field['property']}) > strtotime(\$b->{$field['property']}) ? 1 : -1)";
            } else {
               
$comparerFunction = "strcasecmp(\$a->{$field['property']},\$b->{$field['property']})";
            }
            if (
$field['order'] === 'DESC') { $comparerFunction = "-".$comparerFunction; }
           
$comparerFunctionString .= "$comparerFunction != 0 ? $comparerFunction : (";
        }
       
$comparer = "return ($comparerFunctionString 0 )".str_repeat(")", sizeof($fields)).";";
       
usort($objects, create_function('$a,$b', $comparer));
}
?>
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1
stephen in koto
8 years ago
For using usort inside a method in an object, where the callback sort method is in the same object, this works:

<?php usort($arr_to_sort, array($this, "sort_terms_by_criteria")); ?>

If you wish to keep elements in their original or reverse order if they are the same length, just don't return zero for items that compare the same. Return a 1 or -1, as appropriate.
up
1
sydney at totoche dot org
8 years ago
Instead of doing  :

<?php $strc = strcmp( strtolower($a[$f]), strtolower($b[$f]) ); ?>

you could do this :

<?php $strc = strcasecmp( $a[$f], $b[$f] ); ?>

which is more efficient and is does case insensitive comparison according to the current locale.
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0
Jian Wu
1 year ago
The usort function actually moves $b up when the callback function returns both 0 and 1.  If you want to preserve the original order in the array, return 1 when $a == $b instead of 0.  Try this code below to see how usort alters the order of the original array when all values are the same.

<?php
class TestObj {
    private
$name;
    private
$id;

    function
TestObj($name, $id) {
       
$this->name = $name;
       
$this->id = $id;
    }

    static function
cmp_obj($a, $b) {
       
$al = strtolower($a->name);
       
$bl = strtolower($b->name);
        if (
$al == $bl) {
            return
0; // return 1 if you don't want $b to go in front of $a
       
}
        return (
$al > $bl) ? +1 : -1;
    }
}

$a[] = new TestObj("a", 1);
$a[] = new TestObj("a", 2);
$a[] = new TestObj("a", 3);

var_dump($a);
usort($a, array("TestObj", "cmp_obj"));
var_dump($a);
?>
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1
sean at NOSPAM dot orwd dot com
8 years ago
In order to get a proper text sorting I have changed the arfsort() function submitted by jonathan(at)inetz(dot)com.

The one line I have changed is:

<?php
$strc
= strcmp( $a[$f], $b[$f] );
?>

to

<?php
$strc
= strcmp( strtolower($a[$f]), strtolower($b[$f]) );
?>

It can now sort correctly for alphabetization.  Capital letters where getting in the way.

Sean
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1
todor at todor dot net
10 years ago
To sort multidimentional arrays .... by one key.

<?php
function multi_sort($tab,$key){
   
$compare = create_function('$a,$b','if ($a["'.$key.'"] == $b["'.$key.'"]) {return 0;}else {return ($a["'.$key.'"] > $b["'.$key.'"]) ? -1 : 1;}');
   
usort($tab,$compare) ;
    return
$tab ;
}
?>
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0
nicolas dot demarque at gmail dot com
4 years ago
Another way to compare object is to have a compare static function in the class with reccursion ability and have globals or static variables who save the state of comparison, and the order.

It could be a good idea to have a variable with comparison functions name (with the sorting : numeric, alphanumeric, inverse).

<?php
interface Comparable{static function compare($a, $b);}
class
myObj implements Comparable{
        var
$var1; var $var2; var $var3;
        function
__construct($v1, $v2, $v3){
               
$this->var1=$v1; $this->var2=$v2; $this->var3=$v3;
        }
        public function
__toString() {
                return
"v1 ".$this->var1." v2 ".$this->var2." v3 ".$this->var3;
        }
        static function
compare($a, $b){
               
$sort=$GLOBALS['sorts'][$GLOBALS['sort']];
                echo
"$sort\n";
                if(
$a->$sort == $b->$sort){
                        if(
$GLOBALS['sorts'][$GLOBALS['sort']+1]){
                               
$GLOBALS['sort']++;
                               
$rescall_user_func(array('myObj', 'compare'), $a, $b);
                               
$GLOBALS['sort']=0; return $res;
                        }
                       
$GLOBALS['sort']=0; return 0;
                }
               
$GLOBALS['sort']=0;
                if(
$a->$sort > $b->$sort)
                        return
1;
                return -
1;
        }
}

$objects = array(new myObj("1", "2", "3"), new myObj("2", "2", "2"), new myObj("1", "3", "4"));

/* Tests */
$sorts=Array('var1', 'var2', 'var3'); $sort = 0; usort($objects, array('myObj', 'compare')); echo ("var1 var2 var3\n"); foreach($objects as $o)echo $o."\n";
$sorts=Array('var2', 'var3', 'var1'); $sort = 0; usort($objects, array('myObj', 'compare')); echo ("\nvar2 var3 var1\n"); foreach($objects as $o)echo $o."\n";
$sorts=Array('var2', 'var1', 'var3'); $sort = 0; usort($objects, array('myObj', 'compare')); echo ("\nvar2 var1 var3\n"); foreach($objects as $o)echo $o."\n";

?>
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0
Paul Geraghty foofoonet at the G Mall
4 years ago
For anyone else sorting mixed RSS feeds in date order, here's an example of the perhaps not so obvious way of calling a method from the same class using usort():

<?php
class MyAggregator {

  static function
cmp_pubdate( $a, $b ) {
   
$a_t = strtotime( $a['pubdate'] ) ;
   
$b_t = strtotime( $b['pubdate'] ) ;

    if(
$a_t == $b_t ) return 0 ;
    return (
$a_t > $b_t ) ? -1 : 1;
  }

// assemble arrays for display in date order
 
function all_documents(){
   
$all_data  = array_merge (
   
$this->upcoming(), $this->past() ) ;

// Use within its own class using the $this syntax so:
   
usort( $all_data, array( $this , "cmp_pubdate" ) ) ;

  return
$all_data ;
  }
}
?>

As previously said, use as a static function in other parts of your code:

<?php usort ( $a, array( "MyAggregator", "cmp_pubdate" ) ) ; ?>
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1
jfren484 AT hotmail DOT com
11 years ago
If you've used ADO before, you may have used the Sort property on a recordset.  It's very powerful - you can add a nice ORDER BY clause after getting the recordset from the database.  It's especially helpful if you want to show a list on a web page and make the column headings links that cause the list to resort on that column.

I wanted to do the same thing with mysql recordsets, but it looks like you have to have the ORDER BY in your query.  I re-worked the example from johan_land at yahoo dot com above for sorting multidimensional arrays.  When I get a mysql recordset, I create an array with all of the records like this:

<?php
$aaRows
[]    = array();
if (
mysql_num_rows($rsRows) > 0)
    while (
$aRow = mysql_fetch_array($rsRows, MYSQL_ASSOC))
       
$aaRows[]    = $aRow;
?>

At this point $aaRows is an array of arrays - it's a numeric-indexed array containing records from the recordset, which themselves are associative arrays.  The following code takes the array of records as the first parameter, and an array of fields to sort - each field is an associative array, where 'name' is the db field name, and 'dir' is the direction to sort.  If dir is 'DESC' (case-insensitive), it will sort descending.  Any other value (including not setting one) will cause it to sort ascending.

<?php
function sortRows(&$a_aaRows, $a_aaSortCriteria)
{
    GLOBAL   
$g_aaSortArray;

    function
compare($a_aRow1, $a_aRow2, $a_lField = 0)
    {
        GLOBAL   
$g_aaSortArray;

       
$lCompareVal    = 0;

        if (
$a_lField < count($g_aaSortArray))
        {
           
$sSortFieldName    = $g_aaSortArray[$a_lField]['name'];
           
$sSortFieldDir    = $g_aaSortArray[$a_lField]['dir'];

           
$vValue1    = eval('return $a_aRow1[' . $sSortFieldName . '];');
           
$vValue2    = eval('return $a_aRow2[' . $sSortFieldName . '];');

            if (
$vValue1 == $vValue2)
               
$lCompareVal    = compare($a_aRow1, $a_aRow2, $a_lField + 1);
            else
            {
               
$lCompareVal    =    $vValue1 > $vValue2 ? 1 : -1;
                if (
strtolower(substr($sSortFieldDir, 0, 4)) == 'desc')
                   
$lCompareVal    = -$lCompareVal;
            }
        }

        return
$lCompareVal;
    }

   
$g_aaSortArray    = $a_aaSortCriteria;
   
usort($a_aaRows, 'compare');
}
?>

When I call it it looks something like this:

<?php
sortRows
($aaRows, array(array('name' => 'STATE', 'dir' => 'ASC'), array('name' => 'CITY', 'dir' => 'DESC')));
?>
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1
graham at irwin dot org
12 years ago
Example 3 above does not work with 4.0.4pl1, unless you write the uasort line as follows:
uasort($a, array ($a[0], "cmp_obj"));

(I assume any instance of the object: a[0] or a[1] or a[2] would work as well)

It does not work at all with associative arrays of objects.
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1
johan_land at yahoo dot com
12 years ago
These functions will sort an array by more than one element. The elements to sort by is specified in $sortArr. If you eg. want to sort by $destArr[]["sortBy2"][0] you add '["sortBy2"][0]' to $sortArr. Use it as much as you want!! If you modify it, please let me know...

<?php
//The functions
function compare($a, $b) {
    return
cmpRec(0, $a, $b);
}

function
cmpRec($i, $a, $b) {
    global
$sortArr;
    if(
$i == sizeof($sortArr)) {
        return
0;
    }
   
$avalue = '$avalue = $a'.$sortArr[$i].';';
   
$bvalue = '$bvalue = $b'.$sortArr[$i].';';
    eval(
$avalue);
    eval(
$bvalue);
        if(
$avalue == $bvalue) {
        return
cmpRec($i+1, $a, $b);
    } else {
        return (
$avalue > $bvalue) ? (1) : (-1);
    }
}

//For testing the functions
$destArr = array( array( "sortBy1" => 2, "sortBy2" => array( "Fish", "eat seafood" )), array( "sortBy1" => 1, "sortBy2" => array( "Lions", "eat everything" )), array( "sortBy1" => 1, "sortBy2" => array( "Bird", "eat birdfood" )) );
$sortArr = array( '["sortBy1"]', '["sortBy2"][0]' );
print_r($destArr);
usort($destArr, "compare");
reset($destArr);
print_r($destArr);
?>
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0
arjini at mac dot com
10 years ago
<?php
/*
This is a class I built to sort parent/child relationships of array elements.
I post this here, because thanks to usort, you can also assign an explicit order
to the elements.

I first built this to sort categories and subcategories.

My database has four fields. category_id, parent_id, category_name, category_position

$rows is an associative array from the database with my categories.
*/
$rows = array( 0=>array('category_id'=>1,'parent_id' =>3,'category_name' =>'Second Child','category_position'=>2),
                   
1=>array('category_id' =>2,'parent_id' =>0,'category_name' =>'Second Parent','category_position'=>2),
                   
2=>array('category_id' =>3,'parent_id' =>0,'category_name' =>'First Parent','category_position'=>1),
                   
3=>array('category_id' =>4,'parent_id' =>0,'category_name' =>'Third Parent','category_position'=>3),
                   
4=>array('category_id' =>5,'parent_id' =>3,'category_name' =>'First Child','category_position'=>1),
                   
5=>array('category_id' =>6,'parent_id' =>5,'category_name'=>'Second Sub-Child','category_position'=>2),
                   
6=>array('category_id' =>7,'parent_id' =>5,'category_name' =>'First Sub-Child','category_position'=>1)
                    );

$ordered = chain('category_id', 'parent_id', 'category_position', $rows);

foreach(
$ordered as $item)
{
    echo
str_repeat('------', $item['indent']).$item['category_name'].'<br>';
}

/*

Output

First Parent
------First Child
------------First Sub-Child
------------Second Sub-Child
------Second Child
Second Parent
Third Parent

You can have it only return a certain "branch" if you specify a root_id.
Aditionally, you can keep it by going to deep by specifying max-level.

Hope someone finds this useful, I sure would have liked to see this here a week ago.

Ah yes... and the code that runs it.
*/

function chain($primary_field, $parent_field, $sort_field, $rows, $root_id=0, $maxlevel=25)
{
   
$c = new chain($primary_field, $parent_field, $sort_field, $rows, $root_id, $maxlevel);
    return
$c->chain_table;
}

class
chain
{
    var
$table;
    var
$rows;
    var
$chain_table;
    var
$primary_field;
    var
$parent_field;
    var
$sort_field;
   
    function
chain($primary_field, $parent_field, $sort_field, $rows, $root_id, $maxlevel)
    {
       
$this->rows = $rows;
       
$this->primary_field = $primary_field;
       
$this->parent_field = $parent_field;
       
$this->sort_field = $sort_field;
       
$this->buildChain($root_id,$maxlevel);
    }

    function
buildChain($rootcatid,$maxlevel)
    {
        foreach(
$this->rows as $row)
        {
           
$this->table[$row[$this->parent_field]][ $row[$this->primary_field]] = $row;
        }
       
$this->makeBranch($rootcatid,0,$maxlevel);
    }
           
    function
makeBranch($parent_id,$level,$maxlevel)
    {
       
$rows=$this->table[$parent_id];
        foreach(
$rows as $key=>$value)
        {
           
$rows[$key]['key'] = $this->sort_field;
        }
       
       
usort($rows,'chainCMP');
        foreach(
$rows as $item)
        {
           
$item['indent'] = $level;
           
$this->chain_table[] = $item;
            if((isset(
$this->table[$item[$this->primary_field]])) && (($maxlevel>$level+1) || ($maxlevel==0)))
            {
               
$this->makeBranch($item[$this->primary_field], $level+1, $maxlevel);
            }
        }
    }
}

function
chainCMP($a,$b)
{
    if(
$a[$a['key']] == $b[$b['key']])
    {
        return
0;
    }
    return(
$a[$a['key']]<$b[$b['key']])?-1:1;
}

?>
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0
skrebbel at operamail dot com
11 years ago
here's another recursive multisort, however a clean and fast one that is class-based (but works as well outside classes) and does not uglify your global namespace at all. note that strnatcmp is used, but one could use something else of course.

btw, for arrays in which the rows/columns are 'swapped', use array_multisort().

<?php
class Banana {
    var
$aData;//the array we want to sort.
   
var $aSortkeys;//the order in which we want the array to be sorted.
   
function _sortcmp($a, $b, $i=0) {
       
$r = strnatcmp($a[$this->aSortkeys[$i]],$b[$this->aSortkeys[$i]]);
        if(
$r==0) {
           
$i++;
            if (
$this->aSortkeys[$i]) $r = $this->_sortcmp($a, $b, $i+1);
        }
        return
$r;
    }
    function
sort() {
        if(
count($this->aSortkeys)) {
           
usort($this->aData,array($this,"_sortcmp"));
        }
    }
}
$B = new Banana;
$B->aData = array(
    array(
"name" => "hank", "headsize" => "big", "age" => 32),
    array(
"name" => "frank", "headsize" => "huge", "age" => 36)
);
$B->aSortkeys = array("age","name");
$B->sort();

?>
sorry for the ugly indenting, but i couldn't get it any better in this note adder thing.
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0
xnoguer at rezebra dot com
12 years ago
just for debugging purposes, usort does not complain if its argument function is not defined, i.e.:

<?php usort($my_array,"non existant function"); ?>

will not do anything...
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0
bo at erichsen dot com
13 years ago
when using usort to refer to a function inside a class i have succesfully used:

<?php usort($myarray,array($this,"cmp")); ?>
up
-1
Rogier
4 years ago
<?php
// I have seen many examples of sorting, almost all of which
// are too specific and require one implementation per property
// on which to sort.
// So I decided to use Reflection, implementing a more generic approach that in fact turned out
// to resemble an approach I used in the early days of .NET...

// Intentionally, I did not do any checking on existing
// items. This is just to keep simplicity and to
// demonstrate the sorting functionality.

// A more real-life appraoach would require e.g. a collection that is based
// on implementing the Iterator, ArrayAccess and Countable interfaces.

// Take note that this implementation is specific for PHP5+ only
// This code was tested on PHP 5.0.4

class SortableItem
{
    static public
$sortProperty;
   
    static function
USortAsc($a, $b)
    {
       
/*@var $_pd ReflectionProperty*/
       
$_pd = self::$sortProperty;
        if (
$_pd !== null)
        {
            if (
$_pd->getValue($a) === $_pd->getValue($b))
                return
0;
            else
                return ((
$_pd->getValue($a) < $_pd->getValue($b))?-1:1);
        }
        return
0;
    }

    static function
USortDesc($a, $b)
    {
        return -(
self::USortAsc($a,$b));
    }

}
class
Item extends SortableItem
{
    public
$name;
    public
$index;
    public
$description;
   
    function
__construct($nam,$idx,$desc)
    {
       
$this->name = $nam;
       
$this->index = $idx;
       
$this->description = $desc;
    }
    function
__toString()
    {
        return
"$this->index; $this->name; $this->description\n";
    }
}
class
ItemCollection
{
    protected
$_array = array();
    protected
$_itemDescriptor;
   
    function
__construct()
    {
       
$this->_itemDescriptor = new ReflectionClass('Item');
    }
   
    function
Add(Item $item)
    {
       
$this->_array[] = $item;
    }
   
    function
Sort($property, $asc=true)
    {
       
// this is where sorting logic takes place
       
$_pd = $this->_itemDescriptor->getProperty($property);
        if (
$_pd == null)
        {
           
user_error('Property '.$property.' does not exist in class '.$this->_itemDescriptor->getName(), E_WARNING);
            return;
        }
       
// set sortDescriptor
       
Item::$sortProperty = $_pd;
       
// and apply sorting
       
usort($this->_array, array('Item', ($asc?'USortAsc':'USortDesc')));
    }
   
    function
getItems(){return $this->_array;}
}

//testing it....
$utime = microtime(true);
$coll = new ItemCollection();
$coll->Add( new Item('apple',0,'a sour fruit') );
$coll->Add( new Item('pear',54,'delicious pears') );
$coll->Add( new Item('mango',245,'bread and butter') );

echo
PHP_EOL,'sort by index, asc',PHP_EOL;
$coll->Sort('index',true);
$items = $coll->getItems();
foreach(
$items as $item)
{
    echo
$item->__toString();
}

echo
PHP_EOL,'sort by index, desc',PHP_EOL;
$coll->Sort('index',false);
$items = $coll->getItems();
foreach(
$items as $item)
{
    echo
$item->__toString();
}

echo
PHP_EOL,'sort by name, asc',PHP_EOL;
$coll->Sort('name',true);
$items = $coll->getItems();
foreach(
$items as $item)
{
    echo
$item->__toString();
}

echo
PHP_EOL,'sort by name, desc',PHP_EOL;
$coll->Sort('name',false);
$items = $coll->getItems();
foreach(
$items as $item)
{
    echo
$item->__toString();
}
$utime = microtime(true)-$utime;
echo
PHP_EOL,' sorting all took ',round(1000*$utime,2),' ms';
?>
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-1
masonswolf+ignorethispart at gmail dot com
2 years ago
[The second version of a function I wrote], just a little cleaner to use, since the usort call is now folded into the custom 'usortByArrayKey' function.

Seems like this is a popular problem - sorting an array of arrays by the keys of sub-arrays, so I'll go ahead and throw in an approach I haven't seen anyone mention yet. It only works since PHP 5.3 because that's when anonymous functions got added to the language.

<?php
function usortByArrayKey(&$array, $key, $asc=SORT_ASC) {
   
$sort_flags = array(SORT_ASC, SORT_DESC);
    if(!
in_array($asc, $sort_flags)) throw new InvalidArgumentException('sort flag only accepts SORT_ASC or SORT_DESC');
   
$cmp = function(array $a, array $b) use ($key, $asc, $sort_flags) {
        if(!
is_array($key)) { //just one key and sort direction
           
if(!isset($a[$key]) || !isset($b[$key])) {
                throw new
Exception('attempting to sort on non-existent keys');
            }
            if(
$a[$key] == $b[$key]) return 0;
            return (
$asc==SORT_ASC xor $a[$key] < $b[$key]) ? 1 : -1;
        } else {
//using multiple keys for sort and sub-sort
           
foreach($key as $sub_key => $sub_asc) {
               
//array can come as 'sort_key'=>SORT_ASC|SORT_DESC or just 'sort_key', so need to detect which
               
if(!in_array($sub_asc, $sort_flags)) { $sub_key = $sub_asc; $sub_asc = $asc; }
               
//just like above, except 'continue' in place of return 0
               
if(!isset($a[$sub_key]) || !isset($b[$sub_key])) {
                    throw new
Exception('attempting to sort on non-existent keys');
                }
                if(
$a[$sub_key] == $b[$sub_key]) continue;
                return (
$sub_asc==SORT_ASC xor $a[$sub_key] < $b[$sub_key]) ? 1 : -1;
            }
            return
0;
        }
    };
   
usort($array, $cmp);
};
?>

Examples:
1) Sort a multi-dimensional array by a single key, from least to greatest:
    usortByArrayKey($resultset, 'order_id');

2) Sort a multi-dimensional array by a single key, from greatest to least:
    usortByArrayKey($resultset, 'purchase_amount', SORT_DESC);

3) Sort a multi-dimensional array first by one key, but then by a different key when the first one is equal, both from least to greatest:
    usortByArrayKey($resultset, array('product_id', 'price'));

4) Sort a multi-dimensional array by two different keys from least to greatest, and then a third from greatest to least if the first two keys map to the equal values:
    usortByArrayKey($resultset, array('product_id', 'customer_id', 'date'=>SORT_DESC));

5) Sort a multi-dimensional array by multiple keys, all from greatest to least:
    usortByArrayKey($resultset, array('product_id', 'price'), SORT_DESC);

One word of caution, since SORT_ASC and SORT_DESC have actual int values of 4 and 3, respectively, if you need to sort a multi-dimensional array by keys 3 or 4, and you're using an array to pass in your keys, you MUST specify your sort flags (e.g. array(3 => SORT_ASC,...)) to prevent unexpected behavior, instead of relying on the function's second parameter as your default sort flag.
up
-1
phpguy at lifetoward dot com
4 years ago
I recommend that you take special note of the fact that an INTEGER value must be returned from a sorting callback function. So, let's say you want to sort arrays by a quotient of two of their elements and to do so you write something like:
<?php
function sorter($a, $b)
{ return
$a['num']/$a['denom'] - $b['num']/$b['denom']; }
?>

You may not get the result you want because probably $x['num']/$x['denom'] has absolute value less than 1 and you'll get a lot of "same value" effective results from the comparator function as integer rounding occurs.

To solve this just boost up the quotients to be big integers, then subtract them:

<?php
function sorter($a, $b)
{ return
1000*$a['num']/$a['denom'] - 1000*$b['num']/$b['denom']; }
?>
up
-2
kristen at ccshoreline dot org
10 years ago
I have a class with a bunch of functions that work with an SQL database. I am working with calendar dates that occur more than once (like once a week for 2 months), so I have to generate the date in php after the SQL. But I wanted to sort the events based on the date, so I tried using usort, but was unable to get it to work, because it didn't think that my sorting function was defined (even though it was in the same class). I have a separate class to store the data, that has a variable called Start which is a PHP date object.

So here is how I got it to work. First I created a temporary function, that returned the value of a string comparison of the timestamps for the dates. Then I used that temporary function for the usort. Enjoy.

<?php
$tempfunction
= create_function('$event1,$event2',
       
'return strcmp($event1->Start[0],$event2->Start[0]);');
usort($data,$tempfunction);
?>
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