PHP 5.6.0beta1 released

mysqli_stmt::prepare

mysqli_stmt_prepare

(PHP 5)

mysqli_stmt::prepare -- mysqli_stmt_preparePrepare an SQL statement for execution

Description

Oriented object style

mixed mysqli_stmt::prepare ( string $query )

Procedural style

bool mysqli_stmt_prepare ( mysqli_stmt $stmt , string $query )

Prepares the SQL query pointed to by the null-terminated string query.

The parameter markers must be bound to application variables using mysqli_stmt_bind_param() and/or mysqli_stmt_bind_result() before executing the statement or fetching rows.

Note:

In the case where you pass a statement to mysqli_stmt_prepare() that is longer than max_allowed_packet of the server, the returned error codes are different depending on whether you are using MySQL Native Driver (mysqlnd) or MySQL Client Library (libmysql). The behavior is as follows:

  • mysqlnd on Linux returns an error code of 1153. The error message means "got a packet bigger than max_allowed_packet bytes".

  • mysqlnd on Windows returns an error code 2006. This error message means "server has gone away".

  • libmysql on all platforms returns an error code 2006. This error message means "server has gone away".

Parameters

stmt

Procedural style only: A statement identifier returned by mysqli_stmt_init().

query

The query, as a string. It must consist of a single SQL statement.

You can include one or more parameter markers in the SQL statement by embedding question mark (?) characters at the appropriate positions.

Note:

You should not add a terminating semicolon or \g to the statement.

Note:

The markers are legal only in certain places in SQL statements. For example, they are allowed in the VALUES() list of an INSERT statement (to specify column values for a row), or in a comparison with a column in a WHERE clause to specify a comparison value.

However, they are not allowed for identifiers (such as table or column names), in the select list that names the columns to be returned by a SELECT statement), or to specify both operands of a binary operator such as the = equal sign. The latter restriction is necessary because it would be impossible to determine the parameter type. In general, parameters are legal only in Data Manipulation Language (DML) statements, and not in Data Definition Language (DDL) statements.

Return Values

Returns TRUE on success or FALSE on failure.

Examples

Example #1 Oriented object style

<?php
$mysqli 
= new mysqli("localhost""my_user""my_password""world");

/* check connection */
if (mysqli_connect_errno()) {
    
printf("Connect failed: %s\n"mysqli_connect_error());
    exit();
}

$city "Amersfoort";

/* create a prepared statement */
$stmt =  $mysqli->stmt_init();
if (
$stmt->prepare("SELECT District FROM City WHERE Name=?")) {

    
/* bind parameters for markers */
    
$stmt->bind_param("s"$city);

    
/* execute query */
    
$stmt->execute();

    
/* bind result variables */
    
$stmt->bind_result($district);

    
/* fetch value */
    
$stmt->fetch();

    
printf("%s is in district %s\n"$city$district);

    
/* close statement */
    
$stmt->close();
}

/* close connection */
$mysqli->close();
?>

Example #2 Procedural style

<?php
$link 
mysqli_connect("localhost""my_user""my_password""world");

/* check connection */
if (mysqli_connect_errno()) {
    
printf("Connect failed: %s\n"mysqli_connect_error());
    exit();
}

$city "Amersfoort";

/* create a prepared statement */
$stmt mysqli_stmt_init($link);
if (
mysqli_stmt_prepare($stmt'SELECT District FROM City WHERE Name=?')) {

    
/* bind parameters for markers */
    
mysqli_stmt_bind_param($stmt"s"$city);

    
/* execute query */
    
mysqli_stmt_execute($stmt);

    
/* bind result variables */
    
mysqli_stmt_bind_result($stmt$district);

    
/* fetch value */
    
mysqli_stmt_fetch($stmt);

    
printf("%s is in district %s\n"$city$district);

    
/* close statement */
    
mysqli_stmt_close($stmt);
}

/* close connection */
mysqli_close($link);
?>

The above examples will output:

Amersfoort is in district Utrecht

See Also

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User Contributed Notes 9 notes

up
4
logos-php at kith dot org
2 years ago
Note that if you're using a question mark as a placeholder for a string value, you don't surround it with quotation marks in the MySQL query.

For example, do this:

mysqli_stmt_prepare($stmt, "SELECT * FROM foo WHERE foo.Date > ?");

Do not do this:

mysqli_stmt_prepare($stmt, "SELECT * FROM foo WHERE foo.Date > '?'");

If you put quotation marks around a question mark in the query, then PHP doesn't recognize the question mark as a placeholder, and then when you try to use mysqli_stmt_bind_param(), it gives an error to the effect that you have the wrong number of parameters.

The lack of quotation marks around a string placeholder is implicit in the official example on this page, but it's not explicitly stated in the docs, and I had trouble figuring it out, so figured it was worth posting.
up
1
kontakt at arthur minus schiwon dot de
5 years ago
If you wrap the placeholders with quotation marks you will experience warnings like "Number of variables doesn't match number of parameters in prepared statement" (at least with INSERT Statements).
up
0
logos-php at kith dot orgpp
2 years ago
Turns out you can't directly use a prepared statement for a query that has a placeholder in an IN() clause.

There are ways around that (such as constructing a string that consists of n question marks separated by commas, then using that set of placeholders in the IN() clause), but you can't just say IN (?).

This is a MySQL restriction rather than a PHP restriction, but it's not really documented in the MySQL docs either, so I figured it was worth mentioning here.

(Btw, turns out someone else had previously posted the info that I put in my previous comment, about not using quotation marks. Sorry for the repeat; not sure how I missed the earlier comment.)
up
0
ndungi at gmail dot com
4 years ago
The `prepare` , `bind_param`, `bind_result`, `fetch` result, `close` stmt cycle can be tedious at times. Here is an object that does all the mysqli mumbo jumbo for you when all you want is a select leaving you to the bare essential `preparedSelect` on a prepared stmt. The method returns the result set as a 2D associative array with the `select`ed columns as keys. I havent done sufficient error-checking and it also may have some bugs. Help debug and improve on it.

I used the bible.sql db from http://www.biblesql.net/sites/biblesql.net/files/bible.mysql.gz.

Baraka tele!

============================

<?php

class DB
{
    public
$connection;
   
   
#establish db connection
   
public function __construct($host="localhost", $user="user", $pass="", $db="bible")
    {
       
$this->connection = new mysqli($host, $user, $pass, $db);
                 
        if(
mysqli_connect_errno())
        {
            echo(
"Database connect Error : "
           
. mysqli_connect_error($mysqli));
        }   
    }
   
   
#store mysqli object
   
public function connect()
    {
        return
$this->connection;
    }

   
#run a prepared query
   
public function runPreparedQuery($query, $params_r)
    {
       
$stmt = $this->connection->prepare($query);
       
$this->bindParameters($stmt, $params_r);

        if (
$stmt->execute()) {
            return
$stmt;
        } else {
            echo(
"Error in $statement: "
                     
. mysqli_error($this->connection));
            return
0;
        }
       
    }

 
# To run a select statement with bound parameters and bound results.
 # Returns an associative array two dimensional array which u can easily 
 # manipulate with array functions.
 
   
public function preparedSelect($query, $bind_params_r)
    {
       
$select = $this->runPreparedQuery($query, $bind_params_r);
       
$fields_r = $this->fetchFields($select);
       
        foreach (
$fields_r as $field) {
           
$bind_result_r[] = &${$field};
        }
       
       
$this->bindResult($select, $bind_result_r);
       
       
$result_r = array();
       
$i = 0;
        while (
$select->fetch()) {
            foreach (
$fields_r as $field) {
               
$result_r[$i][$field] = $$field;
            }
           
$i++;
        }
       
$select->close();
        return
$result_r;   
    }
   
   
   
#takes in array of bind parameters and binds them to result of
    #executed prepared stmt
   
   
private function bindParameters(&$obj, &$bind_params_r)
    {
       
call_user_func_array(array($obj, "bind_param"), $bind_params_r);
    }
   
    private function
bindResult(&$obj, &$bind_result_r)
    {
       
call_user_func_array(array($obj, "bind_result"), $bind_result_r);
    }
   
   
#returns a list of the selected field names
   
   
private function fetchFields($selectStmt)
    {
       
$metadata = $selectStmt->result_metadata();
       
$fields_r = array();
        while (
$field = $metadata->fetch_field()) {
           
$fields_r[] = $field->name;
        }

        return
$fields_r;
    }
}
#end of class
 
#An example of the DB class in use

$DB = new DB("localhost", "root", "", "bible");
$var = 5;
$query = "SELECT abbr, name from books where id > ?" ;
$bound_params_r = array("i", $var);

$result_r = $DB->preparedSelect($query, $bound_params_r);

#loop thru result array and display result

foreach ($result_r as $result) {
    echo
$result['abbr'] . " : " . $result['name'] . "<br/>" ;
}

?>
up
0
mhradek AT gmail.com
5 years ago
A particularly helpful adaptation of this function and the call_user_func_array function:

// $params is sent as array($val=>'i', $val=>'d', etc...)

function db_stmt_bind_params($stmt, $params)
{
    $funcArg[] = $stmt;
    foreach($params as $val=>$type)
    {
        $funcArg['type'] .= $type;
        $funcArg[] = $val;
    }
    return call_user_func_array('mysqli_stmt_bind_param', $funcArgs);
}

Thanks to 'sned' for the code.
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0
lukaszNOSPAMPLEASE at epas dot pl
6 years ago
i've got some bad news for you guys if you haven't found out already.
the trick with mysqli_next_result() only prevents having the connection dropped after a stored procedure call.
apparently you can bind parameters for a prepared stored procedure call, but you'll get messed up records from mysqli_stmt_fetch() after mysqli_stmt_bind_result(), at least when the stored procedure itself contains a prepared statement.
a way to avoid data corruption could be specifying the CLIENT_MULTI_STATEMENTS flag in mysqli_real_connect(), if it wasn't disabled entirely (for security reasons, as they say). another option is to use mysqli_multi_query(), but then you can't bind at all.
up
0
st dot john dot johnson at gmail dot com
6 years ago
In reference to what lachlan76 said before, stored procedures CAN be executed through prepared statements as long as you tell the DB to move to the next result before executing again.

Example (Five calls to a stored procedure):

<?php
for ($i=0;$i<5;$i++) {
 
$statement = $mysqli->stmt_init();
 
$statement->prepare("CALL some_procedure( ? )");

 
// Bind, execute, and bind.
 
$statement->bind_param("i", 1);
 
$statement->execute();
 
$statement->bind_result($results);

  while(
$statement->fetch()) {
   
// Do what you want with your results.
 
}

 
$statement->close();

 
// Now move the mysqli connection to a new result.
 
while($mysqli->next_result()) { }
}
?>

If you include the last statement, this code should execute without the nasty "Commands out of sync" error.
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0
lachlan76 at gmail dot com
7 years ago
Do not try to use a stored procedure through a prepared statement.

Example:

<?php
$statement
= $mysqli->stmt_init();
$statement->prepare("CALL some_procedure()");
?>

If you attempt to do this, it will fail by dropping the connection during the next query.  Use mysqli_multi_query instead.

Example:

<?php
$mysqli
->multi_query("CALL some_procedure()");
do
{
 
$result = $mysqli->store_result();

  
// Do your processing work here 
 
 
$result->free();
} while(
$mysqli->next_result());
?>

This means that you cannot bind parameters or results, however.
up
0
andrey at php dot net
8 years ago
If you select LOBs use the following order of execution or you risk mysqli allocating more memory that actually used

1)prepare()
2)execute()
3)store_result()
4)bind_result()

If you skip 3) or exchange 3) and 4) then mysqli will allocate memory for the maximal length of the column which is 255 for tinyblob, 64k for blob(still ok), 16MByte for MEDIUMBLOB - quite a lot and 4G for LONGBLOB (good if you have so much memory). Queries which use this order a bit slower when there is a LOB but this is the price of not having memory exhaustion in seconds.
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