Basic usage

Note:

As of PHP 4.1.0, $_SESSION is available as a global variable just like $_POST, $_GET, $_REQUEST and so on. Unlike $HTTP_SESSION_VARS, $_SESSION is always global. Therefore, you do not need to use the global keyword for $_SESSION. Please note that this documentation has been changed to use $_SESSION everywhere. You can substitute $HTTP_SESSION_VARS for $_SESSION, if you prefer the former. Also note that you must start your session using session_start() before use of $_SESSION becomes available.

The keys in the $_SESSION associative array are subject to the same limitations as regular variable names in PHP, i.e. they cannot start with a number and must start with a letter or underscore. For more details see the section on variables in this manual.

If register_globals is disabled, only members of the global associative array $_SESSION can be registered as session variables. The restored session variables will only be available in the array $_SESSION.

Use of $_SESSION (or $HTTP_SESSION_VARS with PHP 4.0.6 or less) is recommended for improved security and code readability. With $_SESSION, there is no need to use the session_register(), session_unregister(), session_is_registered() functions. Session variables are accessible like any other variables.

Example #1 Registering a variable with $_SESSION.

<?php
session_start
();
// Use $HTTP_SESSION_VARS with PHP 4.0.6 or less
if (!isset($_SESSION['count'])) {
  
$_SESSION['count'] = 0;
} else {
  
$_SESSION['count']++;
}
?>

Example #2 Unregistering a variable with $_SESSION and register_globals disabled.

<?php
session_start
();
// Use $HTTP_SESSION_VARS with PHP 4.0.6 or less
unset($_SESSION['count']);
?>

Caution

Do NOT unset the whole $_SESSION with unset($_SESSION) as this will disable the registering of session variables through the $_SESSION superglobal.

Warning

You can't use references in session variables as there is no feasible way to restore a reference to another variable.

If register_globals is enabled, then each global variable can be registered as session variable. Upon a restart of a session, these variables will be restored to corresponding global variables. Since PHP must know which global variables are registered as session variables, users need to register variables with session_register() function. You can avoid this by simply setting entries in $_SESSION.

Caution

Before PHP 4.3.0, if you are using $_SESSION and you have disabled register_globals, don't use session_register(), session_is_registered() or session_unregister(). Disabling register_globals is recommended for both security and performance reasons.

If register_globals is enabled, then the global variables and the $_SESSION entries will automatically reference the same values which were registered in the prior session instance. However, if the variable is registered by $_SESSION then the global variable is available since the next request.

There is a defect in PHP 4.2.3 and earlier. If you register a new session variable by using session_register(), the entry in the global scope and the $_SESSION entry will not reference the same value until the next session_start(). I.e. a modification to the newly registered global variable will not be reflected by the $_SESSION entry. This has been corrected in PHP 4.3.0.

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User Contributed Notes 1 note

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AlexFBP
4 years ago
Regardless, if you need to set the header 'Location:' before closing the session; explicitly close the php script with "exit()" or "die()" functions. Remember that when a php script ends, the session automatically are going to be closed.
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