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array_map

(PHP 4 >= 4.0.6, PHP 5, PHP 7)

array_mapApplies the callback to the elements of the given arrays

Descrierea

array_map ( callable|null $callback , array $array , array ...$arrays ) : array

array_map() returns an array containing the results of applying the callback to the corresponding index of array (and arrays if more arrays are provided) used as arguments for the callback. The number of parameters that the callback function accepts should match the number of arrays passed to array_map().

Parametri

callback

A callable to run for each element in each array.

null can be passed as a value to callback to perform a zip operation on multiple arrays. If only array is provided, array_map() will return the input array.

array

An array to run through the callback function.

arrays

Supplementary variable list of array arguments to run through the callback function.

Valorile întoarse

Returns an array containing the results of applying the callback function to the corresponding index of array (and arrays if more arrays are provided) used as arguments for the callback.

The returned array will preserve the keys of the array argument if and only if exactly one array is passed. If more than one array is passed, the returned array will have sequential integer keys.

Exemple

Example #1 array_map() example

<?php
function cube($n)
{
    return (
$n $n $n);
}

$a = [12345];
$b array_map('cube'$a);
print_r($b);
?>

This makes $b have:

Array
(
    [0] => 1
    [1] => 8
    [2] => 27
    [3] => 64
    [4] => 125
)

Example #2 array_map() using a lambda function (as of PHP 5.3.0)

<?php
$func 
= function($value) {
    return 
$value 2;
};

print_r(array_map($funcrange(15)));
?>
Array
(
    [0] => 2
    [1] => 4
    [2] => 6
    [3] => 8
    [4] => 10
)

Example #3 array_map() - using more arrays

<?php
function show_Spanish($n$m)
{
    return 
"The number {$n} is called {$m} in Spanish";
}

function 
map_Spanish($n$m)
{
    return [
$n => $m];
}

$a = [12345];
$b = ['uno''dos''tres''cuatro''cinco'];

$c array_map('show_Spanish'$a$b);
print_r($c);

$d array_map('map_Spanish'$a $b);
print_r($d);
?>

Exemplul de mai sus va afișa:

// printout of $c
Array
(
    [0] => The number 1 is called uno in Spanish
    [1] => The number 2 is called dos in Spanish
    [2] => The number 3 is called tres in Spanish
    [3] => The number 4 is called cuatro in Spanish
    [4] => The number 5 is called cinco in Spanish
)

// printout of $d
Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [1] => uno
        )

    [1] => Array
        (
            [2] => dos
        )

    [2] => Array
        (
            [3] => tres
        )

    [3] => Array
        (
            [4] => cuatro
        )

    [4] => Array
        (
            [5] => cinco
        )

)

Usually when using two or more arrays, they should be of equal length because the callback function is applied in parallel to the corresponding elements. If the arrays are of unequal length, shorter ones will be extended with empty elements to match the length of the longest.

An interesting use of this function is to construct an array of arrays, which can be easily performed by using null as the name of the callback function

Example #4 Performing a zip operation of arrays

<?php
$a 
= [12345];
$b = ['one''two''three''four''five'];
$c = ['uno''dos''tres''cuatro''cinco'];

$d array_map(null$a$b$c);
print_r($d);
?>

Exemplul de mai sus va afișa:

Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [0] => 1
            [1] => one
            [2] => uno
        )

    [1] => Array
        (
            [0] => 2
            [1] => two
            [2] => dos
        )

    [2] => Array
        (
            [0] => 3
            [1] => three
            [2] => tres
        )

    [3] => Array
        (
            [0] => 4
            [1] => four
            [2] => cuatro
        )

    [4] => Array
        (
            [0] => 5
            [1] => five
            [2] => cinco
        )

)

Example #5 null callback with only array

<?php
$array 
= [123];
var_dump(array_map(null$array));
?>

Exemplul de mai sus va afișa:

array(3) {
  [0]=>
  int(1)
  [1]=>
  int(2)
  [2]=>
  int(3)
}

Example #6 array_map() - with string keys

<?php
$arr 
= ['stringkey' => 'value'];
function 
cb1($a) {
    return [
$a];
}
function 
cb2($a$b) {
    return [
$a$b];
}
var_dump(array_map('cb1'$arr));
var_dump(array_map('cb2'$arr$arr));
var_dump(array_map(null,  $arr));
var_dump(array_map(null$arr$arr));
?>

Exemplul de mai sus va afișa:

array(1) {
  ["stringkey"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(5) "value"
  }
}
array(1) {
  [0]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(5) "value"
    [1]=>
    string(5) "value"
  }
}
array(1) {
  ["stringkey"]=>
  string(5) "value"
}
array(1) {
  [0]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(5) "value"
    [1]=>
    string(5) "value"
  }
}

A se vedea și

  • array_filter() - Filtrează elementele unui tablou utilizând o funcție de apel invers
  • array_reduce() - Iteratively reduce the array to a single value using a callback function
  • array_walk() - Apply a user supplied function to every member of an array

add a note add a note

User Contributed Notes 6 notes

up
14
lukasz dot mordawski at gmail dot com
7 years ago
Let's assume we have following situation:

<?php
class MyFilterClass {
    public function
filter(array $arr) {
        return
array_map(function($value) {
            return
$this->privateFilterMethod($value);
        });
    }

    private function
privateFilterMethod($value) {
        if (
is_numeric($value)) $value++;
        else
$value .= '.';
    }
}
?>

This will work, because $this inside anonymous function (unlike for example javascript) is the instance of MyFilterClass inside which we called it.
I hope this would be useful for anyone.
up
13
elfe1021 at gmail dot com
7 years ago
Find an interesting thing that in array_map's callable function, late static binding does not work:
<?php
class A {
    public static function
foo($name) {
        return
'In A: '.$name;
    }

    public static function
test($names) {
        return
array_map(function($n) {return static::foo($n);}, $names);
    }
}

class
B extends A{
    public static function
foo($name) {
        return
'In B: '.$name;
    }
}

$result = B::test(['alice', 'bob']);
var_dump($result);
?>

the result is:
array (size=2)
  0 => string 'In A: alice' (length=11)
  1 => string 'In A: bob' (length=9)

if I change A::test to
<?php
   
public static function test($names) {
        return
array_map([get_called_class(), 'foo'], $names);
    }
?>

Then the result is as expected:
array (size=2)
  0 => string 'In B: alice' (length=11)
  1 => string 'In B: bob' (length=9)
up
12
Mahn
5 years ago
You may be looking for a method to extract values of a multidimensional array on a conditional basis (i.e. a mixture between array_map and array_filter) other than a for/foreach loop. If so, you can take advantage of the fact that 1) the callback method on array_map returns null if no explicit return value is specified (as with everything else) and 2) array_filter with no arguments removes falsy values.

So for example, provided you have:

<?php
$data
= [
    [
       
"name" => "John",
       
"smoker" => false
   
],
    [
       
"name" => "Mary",
       
"smoker" => true
   
],
    [
       
"name" => "Peter",
       
"smoker" => false
   
],
    [
       
"name" => "Tony",
       
"smoker" => true
   
]
];
?>

You can extract the names of all the non-smokers with the following one-liner:

<?php
$names
= array_filter(array_map(function($n) { if(!$n['smoker']) return $n['name']; }, $data));
?>

It's not necessarily better than a for/foreach loop, but the occasional one-liner for trivial tasks can help keep your code cleaner.
up
11
radist-hack at yandex dot ru
12 years ago
To transpose rectangular two-dimension array, use the following code:

array_unshift($array, null);
$array = call_user_func_array("array_map", $array);

If you need to rotate rectangular two-dimension array on 90 degree, add the following line before or after (depending on the rotation direction you need) the code above:
$array = array_reverse($array);

Here is example:

<?php
$a
= array(
  array(
1, 2, 3),
  array(
4, 5, 6));
array_unshift($a, null);
$a = call_user_func_array("array_map", $a);
print_r($a);
?>

Output:

Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [0] => 1
            [1] => 4
        )

    [1] => Array
        (
            [0] => 2
            [1] => 5
        )

    [2] => Array
        (
            [0] => 3
            [1] => 6
        )

)
up
6
stijnleenknegt at gmail dot com
13 years ago
If you want to pass an argument like ENT_QUOTES to htmlentities, you can do the follow.

<?php
$array
= array_map( 'htmlentities' , $array, array_fill(0 , count($array) , ENT_QUOTES) );
?>

The third argument creates an equal sized array of $array filled with the parameter you want to give with your callback function.
up
4
CertaiN
8 years ago
The most memory-efficient array_map_recursive().

<?php
function array_map_recursive(callable $func, array $arr) {
   
array_walk_recursive($arr, function(&$v) use ($func) {
       
$v = $func($v);
    });
    return
$arr;
}
?>
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