DateTime::modify

date_modify

(PHP 5 >= 5.2.0)

DateTime::modify -- date_modifyAlters the timestamp

Description

Object oriented style

public DateTime DateTime::modify ( string $modify )

Procedural style

DateTime date_modify ( DateTime $object , string $modify )

Alter the timestamp of a DateTime object by incrementing or decrementing in a format accepted by strtotime().

Parameters

object

Procedural style only: A DateTime object returned by date_create(). The function modifies this object.

modify

A date/time string. Valid formats are explained in Date and Time Formats.

Return Values

Returns the DateTime object for method chaining or FALSE on failure.

Changelog

Version Description
5.3.6 Absolute date/time statements now take effect. Previously, only relative parts were used.
5.3.0Changed the return value on success from NULL to DateTime.

Examples

Example #1 DateTime::modify() example

Object oriented style

<?php
$date 
= new DateTime('2006-12-12');
$date->modify('+1 day');
echo 
$date->format('Y-m-d');
?>

Procedural style

<?php
$date 
date_create('2006-12-12');
date_modify($date'+1 day');
echo 
date_format($date'Y-m-d');
?>

The above examples will output:

2006-12-13

Example #2 Beware when adding or subtracting months

<?php
$date 
= new DateTime('2000-12-31');

$date->modify('+1 month');
echo 
$date->format('Y-m-d') . "\n";

$date->modify('+1 month');
echo 
$date->format('Y-m-d') . "\n";
?>

The above example will output:

2001-01-31
2001-03-03

See Also

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User Contributed Notes 5 notes

up
6
jenspj at msn dot com
2 years ago
These functions makes sure that adding months or years always ends up in the month you would expect.  Works for positive and negative values

<?php
     
      
    $date
=new DateTime();
   
$date->setDate(2008,2,29);
   
    function
addMonths($date,$months){
        
       
$init=clone $date;
       
$modifier=$months.' months';
       
$back_modifier =-$months.' months';
       
       
$date->modify($modifier);
       
$back_to_init= clone $date;
       
$back_to_init->modify($back_modifier);
       
        while(
$init->format('m')!=$back_to_init->format('m')){
       
$date->modify('-1 day')    ;
       
$back_to_init= clone $date;
       
$back_to_init->modify($back_modifier);   
        }
       
       
/*
        if($months<0&&$date->format('m')>$init->format('m'))
        while($date->format('m')-12-$init->format('m')!=$months%12)
        $date->modify('-1 day');
        else
        if($months>0&&$date->format('m')<$init->format('m'))
        while($date->format('m')+12-$init->format('m')!=$months%12)
        $date->modify('-1 day');
        else
        while($date->format('m')-$init->format('m')!=$months%12)
        $date->modify('-1 day');
        */
       
   
}
    
    function
addYears($date,$years){
       
       
$init=clone $date;
       
$modifier=$years.' years';
       
$date->modify($modifier);
       
        while(
$date->format('m')!=$init->format('m'))
       
$date->modify('-1 day');
       
       
    }
   
   
   
   
addMonths($date,-1);
    
addYears($date,3);
   
   
    echo
$date->format('F j,Y');
    
 
?>
up
1
jay dot removethis at grooveshark dot com
5 months ago
Due to DST and the way DateTime internally handles dates, it's possible to get stuck in a time loop.

For example:

<?php
$dt
= new DateTime('2012-03-11 3:00AM');
echo
$dt->format('YmdH') . "\n";
$dt->modify("-1 hour");
echo
$dt->format('YmdH') . "\n";
$dt->modify("-1 hour");
echo
$dt->format('YmdH') . "\n";
?>

prints out:

2012031103
2012031103
2012031103

if your timezone is set to America/New_York.
up
1
php at lanar dot com dot au
5 months ago
modify() ignores any timezone information in the data while the DateTime constructor does not.

$dt = new DateTime( '2013-10-26T11:00:00+11:00' )
will create a +11 timezone while
$dt->modify( '2013-10-26T11:00:00+02:00' )
does not change the timezone or the time.

<?php
$dt
= new DateTime( '2013-10-26T15:00:00Australia/Melbourne' ) ;
echo
"\n", $dt->format( "c" ) ;
echo
"\nTimezone '", $dt->getTimezone()->getName() . "'." ;
// modify $dt to 1 am new york which is 3 pm melbourne
$dt->modify( '2013-10-26T01:00:00America/New_York' ) ;
// result is 1 am melbourne time, not 3 pm
echo "\n", $dt->format( "c" ) ;
echo
"\nTimezone '", $dt->getTimezone()->getName() . "'." ;
?>
Output
2013-10-26T15:00:00+11:00
Timezone 'Australia/Melbourne'.
2013-10-26T01:00:00+11:00
Timezone 'Australia/Melbourne'.
up
0
admin at wmfoi dot com dot br
12 days ago
The changelog says: "5.3.0 - Changed the return value on success from NULL to DateTime".

That means that you can't do a Fluid Interface design with it in PHP 5.2.

In other words, this will not work in 5.2:

<?php
$DateTime
=new DateTime();
echo
$DateTime->modify('+1 day')->format('d');
?>
up
0
Jenny jsimonds@atomic jet packs dot com
2 years ago
Note: This method modifies the object in-place. So if you want to calculate a new date but assign the new value to a different object, this will NOT work:

<?php
$numMinutes
= 25;
$oDateA = new DateTime('2012-01-01 12:00:00');

print
"
Original:<br>
oDateA = 
{$oDateA->format('Y-m-d H-i-s')}<br>
"
;

$oDateB = $oDateA->modify ("+{$numMinutes} minutes");

print
"
plus
{$numMinutes} minutes:<br>
oDateA = 
{$oDateA->format('Y-m-d H-i-s')}<br>
oDateB = 
{$oDateB->format('Y-m-d H-i-s')}<br>
"
;
?>
...produces this:
oDateA = 2012-01-01 12-00-00
plus 25 minutes:
oDateA = 2012-01-01 12-25-00
oDateB = 2012-01-01 12-25-00

Use something like this instead:
<?php
$numMinutes
= 25;
$oDateA = new DateTime('2012-01-01 12:00:00');

print
"
<p>
Original:<br>
oDateA = 
{$oDateA->format('Y-m-d H-i-s')}<br>
"
;

$oDateB = clone $oDateA;
$oDateB->modify ("+{$numMinutes} minutes");

print
"
plus
{$numMinutes} minutes:<br>
oDateA = 
{$oDateA->format('Y-m-d H-i-s')}<br>
oDateB = 
{$oDateB->format('Y-m-d H-i-s')}<br>
"
;
?>

... produces this:
oDateA = 2012-01-01 12-00-00
plus 25 minutes:
oDateA = 2012-01-01 12-00-00
oDateB = 2012-01-01 12-25-00
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