PHP 7.1.0 Release Candidate 3 Released

Funciones variables

PHP admite el concepto de funciones variables. Esto significa que si un nombre de variable tiene paréntesis anexos a él, PHP buscará una función con el mismo nombre que lo evaluado por la variable, e intentará ejecutarla. Entre otras cosas, esto se puede usar para implementar llamadas de retorno, tablas de funciones, y así sucesivamente.

Las funciones variables no funcionarán con constructores de lenguaje como echo, print, unset(), isset(), empty(), include, require y similares. Utilice funciones de envoltura para hacer uso de cualquiera de estos constructores como funciones variables.

Ejemplo #1 Ejemplo de función variable

<?php
function foo() {
    echo 
"En foo()<br />\n";
}

function 
bar($arg '')
{
    echo 
"En bar(); el argumento era '$arg'.<br />\n";
}

// Esta es una función de envoltura alrededor de echo
function hacerecho($cadena)
{
    echo 
$cadena;
}

$func 'foo';
$func();        // Esto llama a foo()

$func 'bar';
$func('prueba');  // Esto llama a bar()

$func 'hacerecho';
$func('prueba');  // Esto llama a hacerecho()
?>

Los métodos de objetos también puede ser llamados con la sintaxis de funciones variables.

Ejemplo #2 Ejemplo de método variable

<?php
class Foo
{
    function 
Variable()
    {
        
$nombre 'Bar';
        
$this->$nombre(); // Esto llama al método Bar()
    
}

    function 
Bar()
    {
        echo 
"Esto es Bar";
    }
}

$foo = new Foo();
$nombrefunc "Variable";
$foo->$nombrefunc();  // Esto llama a $foo->Variable()

?>

Cuando se llaman a métodos estáticos, la llamada a la función es más fuerte que el operador de propiedad static:

Ejemplo #3 Ejemplo de método variable con propiedades estáticas

<?php
class Foo
{
    static 
$variable 'propiedad estática';
    static function 
Variable()
    {
        echo 
'Método Variable llamado';
    }
}

echo 
Foo::$variable// Esto imprime 'propiedad estática'. No necesita una $variable en este ámbito.
$variable "Variable";
Foo::$variable();  // Esto llama a $foo->Variable() leyendo $variable en este ámbito.

?>

A partir de PHP 5.4.0, se puede llamar a cualquier callable almacenado en una variable.

Ejemplo #4 Llamables complejos

<?php
class Foo
{
    static function 
bar()
    {
        echo 
"bar\n";
    }
    function 
baz()
    {
        echo 
"baz\n";
    }
}

$func = array("Foo""bar");
$func(); // imprime "bar"
$func = array(new Foo"baz");
$func(); // imprime "baz"
$func "Foo::bar";
$func(); // imprime "bar" a partrid de PHP 7.0.0; antes, emitía un error fatal
?>

Véase también is_callable(), call_user_func(), variables variables y function_exists().

Historial de cambios

Versión Descripción
7.0.0 'NombreDeClase::NombreDeMétodo' se permite como función variable.
5.4.0 Los arrays, que son llamables válidos, están permitidos como funciones variables.

add a note add a note

User Contributed Notes 11 notes

up
42
Anonymous
1 year ago
i'm not sure, but simple mistake in this place ($f instead $func):
<?php
$func
= array("Foo", "bar");
$func(); // prints "bar"
$f = array(new Foo, "baz");
$func(); // prints "baz"
$f = "Foo::bar";
$func(); // prints "bar" as of PHP 7.0.0; prior, it raised a fatal error
?>
up
1
josh at joshstroup dot xyz
5 months ago
A small, but helpful note. If you are trying to call a static function from a different namespace, you must use the fully qualified namespace, even if they have the same top level namespace(s). For example if you have the following class to call:

<?php
namespace Project\TestClass;
class
Test {
    static function
funcToCall() {
        return
"test";
    }
}
?>
You must call it as:
<?php
namespace Project\OtherTestClass;
class
OtherTest {
    static function
callOtherFunc() {
       
$func = '\Project\TestClass::funcToCall';
       
$func();
    }
}
?>
and not:
<?php
class OtherTest {
    static function
callOtherFunc() {
       
$func = 'TestClass::funcToCall';
       
$func();
    }
}
?>
up
11
Anonymous
5 years ago
$ wget http://www.php.net/get/php_manual_en.tar.gz/from/a/mirror
$ grep -l "\$\.\.\." php-chunked-xhtml/function.*.html

List of functions that accept variable arguments.
<?php
array_diff_assoc
()
array_diff_key()
array_diff_uassoc()
array()
array_intersect_ukey()
array_map()
array_merge()
array_merge_recursive()
array_multisort()
array_push()
array_replace()
array_replace_recursive()
array_unshift()
call_user_func()
call_user_method()
compact()
dba_open()
dba_popen()
echo()
forward_static_call()
fprintf()
fscanf()
httprequestpool_construct()
ibase_execute()
ibase_set_event_handler()
ibase_wait_event()
isset()
list()
maxdb_stmt_bind_param()
maxdb_stmt_bind_result()
mb_convert_variables()
newt_checkbox_tree_add_item()
newt_grid_h_close_stacked()
newt_grid_h_stacked()
newt_grid_v_close_stacked()
newt_grid_v_stacked()
newt_win_choice()
newt_win_entries()
newt_win_menu()
newt_win_message()
newt_win_ternary()
pack()
printf()
register_shutdown_function()
register_tick_function()
session_register()
setlocale()
sprintf()
sscanf()
unset()
var_dump()
w32api_deftype()
w32api_init_dtype()
w32api_invoke_function()
wddx_add_vars()
wddx_serialize_vars()
?>
up
0
Lenix
1 month ago
A Variable method example:

<?php
class hello
{
    private
$funcname='myfunc';
    public function
run()
    {
       
$var=$this->funcname;
       
$this->$var();
    }

    public function
myfunc()
    {
        echo
"Hello World!";
    }
}

$run=new hello();
$run->run();
?>
up
-4
ian at NO_SPAM dot verteron dot net
13 years ago
A good method to pass around variables containing function names within some class is to use the same method as the developers use in preg_replace_callback - with arrays containing an instance of the class and the function name itself.

function call_within_an_object($fun)
{
  if(is_array($fun))
  {
    /* call a function within an object */
    $fun[0]->{$fun[1]}();
  }
  else
  {
    /* call some other function */
    $fun();
  }
}

function some_other_fun()
{
  /* code */
}

class x
{
  function fun($value)
  {
    /* some code */
  }
}

$x = new x();

/* the following line calls $x->fun() */
call_within_an_object(Array($x, 'fun'));

/* the following line calls some_other_fun() */
call_within_an_object('some_other_fun');
up
-6
madeinlisboa at yahoo dot com
14 years ago
Finally, a very easy way to call a variable method in a class:

Example of a class:

class Print() {
    var $mPrintFunction;

    function Print($where_to) {
        $this->mPrintFunction = "PrintTo$where_to";
    }

    function PrintToScreen($content) {
        echo $content;
    }

    function PrintToFile($content) {
        fputs ($file, $contents);
    }

.. .. ..

    // first, function name is parsed, then function is called
    $this->{$this->mPrintFunction}("something to print");
}
up
-9
boards at gmail dot com
10 years ago
If you want to call a static function (PHP5) in a variable method:

Make an array of two entries where the 0th entry is the name of the class to be invoked ('self' and 'parent' work as well) and the 1st entry is the name of the function.  Basically, a 'callback' variable is either a string (the name of the function) or an array (0 => 'className', 1 => 'functionName').

Then, to call that function, you can use either call_user_func() or call_user_func_array().  Examples:

<?php
class A {

  protected
$a;
  protected
$c;

  function
__construct() {
   
$this->a = array('self', 'a');
   
$this->c = array('self', 'c');
  }

  static function
a($name, &$value) {
    echo
$name,' => ',$value++,"\n";
  }

  function
b($name, &$value) {
   
call_user_func_array($this->a, array($name, &$value));
  }

  static function
c($str) {
    echo
$str,"\n";
  }

  function
d() {
   
call_user_func_array($this->c, func_get_args());
  }

  function
e() {
   
call_user_func($this->c, func_get_arg(0));
  }

}

class
B extends A {

  function
__construct() {
   
$this->a = array('parent', 'a');
   
$this->c = array('self', 'c');
  }

  static function
c() {
   
print_r(func_get_args());
  }

  function
d() {
   
call_user_func_array($this->c, func_get_args());
  }

  function
e() {
   
call_user_func($this->c, func_get_args());
  }

}

$a =& new A;
$b =& new B;
$i = 0;

A::a('index', $i);
$a->b('index', $i);

$a->c('string');
$a->d('string');
$a->e('string');

# etc.
?>
up
-8
msmith at pmcc dot com
14 years ago
Try the call_user_func() function.  I find it's a bit simpler to implement, and at very least makes your code a bit more readable... much more readable and simpler to research for someone who isn't familiar with this construct.
up
-10
Storm
11 years ago
This can quite useful for a dynamic database class:

(Note: This just a simplified section)

<?php
class db {

    private
$host = 'localhost';
    private
$user = 'username';
    private
$pass = 'password';
    private
$type = 'mysqli';
   
    public
$lid = 0;

   
// Connection function
   
function connect() {
       
$connect = $this->type.'_connect';
           
        if (!
$this->lid = $connect($this->host, $this->user, $this->pass)) {
            die(
'Unable to connect.');
        }
}
}
$db  = new db;
$db->connect();
?>

Much easier than having multiple database classes or even extending a base class.
up
-19
AnonymousPoster at disposeamail dot com
6 years ago
Variable functions allows higher-order programming.

Here is the classical map example.

<?php
/*
* Map function. At each $element of the $list, calls $fun([$arg1,[$arg2,[...,]],$element,$accumulator),
*      stores the return value into $accumulator for the next loop. Returns the last return value of the function,
*
* Notes : uses call_user_func_array() so passing parameters doesn't depend on $fun signature
*          It also returns FALSE upon error.
*          Please check the php documentation for more information
*/
function map($fun, $list,$params=array()){
   
$acc=NULL;
   
$last=array_push($params, NULL,$acc)-1; // alloc $element and $acc at the end
   
foreach($list as $params[$last-1]){
       
$params[$last]=call_user_func_array($fun , $params  );
    }
   
$acc=array_pop($params);
    return
$acc;
}

function
add($element,$acc){ // maybe only with multi-length function
   
if ($acc == NULL);
    return
$acc=$element+$acc;
}

$result=0;
$result=addTo($result,1);
$result=addTo($result,2);
$result=addTo($result,3);
echo
"result = $result\n";

$result=0;
$result=map('addTo',array(1,2,3));
echo
"result= $result\n";
?>
up
-23
imurnane at internode on net
5 years ago
Create and call a dynamically named function

<?php
$tmp
= "foo";
$
$tmp = function() {
    global
$tmp;
    echo
$tmp;
};

$
$tmp();
?>

Outputs "foo"
To Top