Переменные переменных

Иногда бывает удобно иметь переменными имена переменных. То есть, имя переменной, которое может быть определено и изменено динамически. Обычная переменная определяется примерно таким выражением:

<?php
$a
= 'hello';
?>

Переменная переменной берет значение переменной и рассматривает его как имя переменной. В вышеприведённом примере hello может быть использовано как имя переменной при помощи двух знаков доллара. То есть:

<?php
$$a = 'world';
?>

Теперь в дереве символов PHP определены и содержатся две переменные: $a, содержащая "hello" и $hello, содержащая "world". Таким образом, выражение

<?php
echo "$a {$$a}";
?>

выведет то же, что и

<?php
echo "$a $hello";
?>

то есть, они оба выведут: hello world.

Для того чтобы использовать переменные переменных с массивами, вы должны решить проблему двусмысленности. То есть, если вы напишете $$a[1], обработчику необходимо знать, хотите ли вы использовать $a[1] в качестве переменной, либо вам нужна как переменная $$a, а затем её индекс [1]. Синтаксис для разрешения этой двусмысленности таков: ${$a[1]} для первого случая и ${$a}[1] для второго.

К свойствам класса также можно получить доступ динамически. Переменное имя свойства будет разрешено в том контексте, в котором произойдёт вызов к нему. Например, в случае выражения $foo->$bar, локальная область видимости будет просканирована на наличие переменной $bar, значение которой будет использовано в качестве имени свойства объекта $foo. Это также работает и в том случае, если $bar осуществляет доступ к элементу массива.

Фигурные скобки могут также использоваться, чтобы чётко разграничить имя свойства. Они наиболее полезны при получении доступа к значениям внутри свойства, которое содержит массив, когда имя свойства состоит из нескольких частей, либо когда имя свойства содержит символы, которые иначе не действительны (например, из функции json_decode() или из SimpleXML).

Пример #1 Пример переменного имени свойства

<?php
class foo {
var
$bar = 'I am bar.';
var
$arr = array('I am A.', 'I am B.', 'I am C.');
var
$r = 'I am r.';
}

$foo = new foo();
$bar = 'bar';
$baz = array('foo', 'bar', 'baz', 'quux');
echo
$foo->$bar . "\n";
echo
$foo->{$baz[1]} . "\n";

$start = 'b';
$end = 'ar';
echo
$foo->{$start . $end} . "\n";

$arr = 'arr';
echo
$foo->{$arr[1]} . "\n";

?>

Результат выполнения приведённого примера:


I am bar.
I am bar.
I am bar.
I am r.

Внимание

Обратите внимание, что переменные переменных не могут использоваться с суперглобальными массивами PHP. Переменная $this также является особой, на неё нельзя ссылаться динамически.

add a note

User Contributed Notes 10 notes

up
546
userb at exampleb dot org
13 years ago
<?php

//You can even add more Dollar Signs

$Bar = "a";
$Foo = "Bar";
$World = "Foo";
$Hello = "World";
$a = "Hello";

$a; //Returns Hello
$$a; //Returns World
$$$a; //Returns Foo
$$$$a; //Returns Bar
$$$$$a; //Returns a

$$$$$$a; //Returns Hello
$$$$$$$a; //Returns World

//... and so on ...//

?>
up
7
sebastopolys at gmail dot com
1 year ago
In addition, it is possible to use associative array to secure name of variables available to be used within a function (or class / not tested).

This way the variable variable feature is useful to validate variables; define, output and manage only within the function that receives as parameter
an associative array :
array('index'=>'value','index'=>'value');
index = reference to variable to be used within function
value = name of the variable to be used within function
<?php

$vars
= ['id'=>'user_id','email'=>'user_email'];

validateVarsFunction($vars);

function
validateVarsFunction($vars){

//$vars['id']=34; <- does not work
// define allowed variables
$user_id=21;
$user_email='email@mail.com';

echo
$vars['id']; // prints name of variable: user_id
echo ${$vars['id']}; // prints 21
echo 'Email: '.${$vars['email']}; // print email@mail.com

// we don't have the name of the variables before declaring them inside the function
}
?>
up
68
Anonymous
18 years ago
It may be worth specifically noting, if variable names follow some kind of "template," they can be referenced like this:

<?php
// Given these variables ...
$nameTypes = array("first", "last", "company");
$name_first = "John";
$name_last = "Doe";
$name_company = "PHP.net";

// Then this loop is ...
foreach($nameTypes as $type)
print ${
"name_$type"} . "\n";

// ... equivalent to this print statement.
print "$name_first\n$name_last\n$name_company\n";
?>

This is apparent from the notes others have left, but is not explicitly stated.
up
9
marcin dot dzdza at gmail dot com
5 years ago
The feature of variable variable names is welcome, but it should be avoided when possible. Modern IDE software fails to interpret such variables correctly, regular find/replace also fails. It's a kind of magic :) This may really make it hard to refactor code. Imagine you want to rename variable $username to $userName and try to find all occurrences of $username in code by checking "$userName". You may easily omit:
$a = 'username';
echo $$a;
up
12
jefrey.sobreira [at] gmail [dot] com
9 years ago
If you want to use a variable value in part of the name of a variable variable (not the whole name itself), you can do like the following:

<?php
$price_for_monday
= 10;
$price_for_tuesday = 20;
$price_for_wednesday = 30;

$today = 'tuesday';

$price_for_today = ${ 'price_for_' . $today};
echo
$price_for_today; // will return 20
?>
up
8
Sinured
16 years ago
One interesting thing I found out: You can concatenate variables and use spaces. Concatenating constants and function calls are also possible.

<?php
define
('ONE', 1);
function
one() {
return
1;
}
$one = 1;

${
"foo$one"} = 'foo';
echo
$foo1; // foo
${'foo' . ONE} = 'bar';
echo
$foo1; // bar
${'foo' . one()} = 'baz';
echo
$foo1; // baz
?>

This syntax doesn't work for functions:

<?php
$foo
= 'info';
{
"php$foo"}(); // Parse error

// You'll have to do:
$func = "php$foo";
$func();
?>

Note: Don't leave out the quotes on strings inside the curly braces, PHP won't handle that graciously.
up
9
herebepost (ta at ta) [iwonderr] gmail dot com
7 years ago
While not relevant in everyday PHP programming, it seems to be possible to insert whitespace and comments between the dollar signs of a variable variable. All three comment styles work. This information becomes relevant when writing a parser, tokenizer or something else that operates on PHP syntax.

<?php

$foo
= 'bar';
$

/*
I am complete legal and will compile without notices or error as a variable variable.
*/
$foo = 'magic';

echo
$bar; // Outputs magic.

?>

Behaviour tested with PHP Version 5.6.19
up
16
mason
13 years ago
PHP actually supports invoking a new instance of a class using a variable class name since at least version 5.2

<?php
class Foo {
public function
hello() {
echo
'Hello world!';
}
}
$my_foo = 'Foo';
$a = new $my_foo();
$a->hello(); //prints 'Hello world!'
?>

Additionally, you can access static methods and properties using variable class names, but only since PHP 5.3

<?php
class Foo {
public static function
hello() {
echo
'Hello world!';
}
}
$my_foo = 'Foo';
$my_foo::hello(); //prints 'Hello world!'
?>
up
8
Nathan Hammond
16 years ago
These are the scenarios that you may run into trying to reference superglobals dynamically. Whether or not it works appears to be dependent upon the current scope.

<?php

$_POST
['asdf'] = 'something';

function
test() {
// NULL -- not what initially expected
$string = '_POST';
var_dump(${$string});

// Works as expected
var_dump(${'_POST'});

// Works as expected
global ${$string};
var_dump(${$string});

}

// Works as expected
$string = '_POST';
var_dump(${$string});

test();

?>
up
4
nils dot rocine at gmail dot com
11 years ago
Variable Class Instantiation with Namespace Gotcha:

Say you have a class you'd like to instantiate via a variable (with a string value of the Class name)

<?php

class Foo
{
public function
__construct()
{
echo
"I'm a real class!" . PHP_EOL;
}
}

$class = 'Foo';

$instance = new $class;

?>

The above works fine UNLESS you are in a (defined) namespace. Then you must provide the full namespaced identifier of the class as shown below. This is the case EVEN THOUGH the instancing happens in the same namespace. Instancing a class normally (not through a variable) does not require the namespace. This seems to establish the pattern that if you are using an namespace and you have a class name in a string, you must provide the namespace with the class for the PHP engine to correctly resolve (other cases: class_exists(), interface_exists(), etc.)

<?php

namespace MyNamespace;

class
Foo
{
public function
__construct()
{
echo
"I'm a real class!" . PHP_EOL;
}
}

$class = 'MyNamespace\Foo';

$instance = new $class;

?>
To Top