PHP 8.4.0 Alpha 2 available for testing

array_merge

(PHP 4, PHP 5, PHP 7, PHP 8)

array_mergeFonde uno o più array

Descrizione

array_merge(array $array1, array $array2 = ?, array $... = ?): array

array_merge() fonde gli elementi di uno o più array in modo che i valori di un array siano accodati a quelli dell'array precedente. Restituisce l'array risultante.

Se gli array in input hanno le stesse chiavi stringa, l'ultimo valore di quella chiave sovrascriverà i precedenti. Comunque, se gli array hanno le stesse chiavi numeriche, l'ultimo valore non sovrascriverà quello originale, bensì sarà accodato.

Se viene fornito un solo array, e questo è indicizzato numericamente, le chiavi vengono reindicizzate in una sequenza continua. Nel caso di array associativi, delle chiavi duplicate rimane solo l'ultima. Vedere l'esempio tre per ulteriori dettagli.

Example #1 Esempio di array_merge()

<?php
$array1
= array("colore" => "rosso", 2, 4);
$array2 = array("a", "b", "colore" => "verde", "forma" => "trapezio", 4);
$risultato = array_merge($array1, $array2);
print_r($risultato);
?>

La variabile $risultato sarà:

Array
(
    [colore] => verde
    [0] => 2
    [1] => 4
    [2] => a
    [3] => b
    [forma] => trapezio
    [4] => 4
)

Example #2 Esempio di array_merge()

<?php
$array1
= array();
$array2 = array(1 => "dati");
$result = array_merge($array1, $array2);
?>

Non dimenticarsi che le chiavi numeriche saranno rinumerate!

Array
(
    [0] => data
)

Se si vogliono preservare gli array e li si vuole solo concatenare, usare l'operatore +:

<?php
$array1
= array();
$array2 = array(1 => "dati");
$result = $array1 + $array2;
?>

La chiave numerica sarà preservata e così pure l'associazione.

Array
(
    [1] => data
)

Example #3 esempio di array_merge()

<?php
$array_uno
= array(0 => "mario", 1 => "roberto", 2 => "andrea", 3 => "dante");
$array_due = array("mario => "roberto", "andrea" => "dante", "mario" => "giacomo");

unset(
$array_uno[2]);

$risultato_uno = array_merge($array_uno);
$risultato_due = array_merge($array_due);

print_r(
$risultato_uno);
print_r(
$risultato_due);
?>

Il risultato sarà:

Array
(
    [0] => mario
    [1] => roberto
    [2] => dante
)
Array
(
    [mario] => giacomo
    [andrea] => dante
)

Nota:

Le chiavi condivise verranno sovrascritte dalla prima chiave processata.

Vedere anche array_merge_recursive() e array_combine() e operatori sugli array.

add a note

User Contributed Notes 5 notes

up
309
Julian Egelstaff
14 years ago
In some situations, the union operator ( + ) might be more useful to you than array_merge. The array_merge function does not preserve numeric key values. If you need to preserve the numeric keys, then using + will do that.

ie:

<?php

$array1
[0] = "zero";
$array1[1] = "one";

$array2[1] = "one";
$array2[2] = "two";
$array2[3] = "three";

$array3 = $array1 + $array2;

//This will result in::

$array3 = array(0=>"zero", 1=>"one", 2=>"two", 3=>"three");

?>

Note the implicit "array_unique" that gets applied as well. In some situations where your numeric keys matter, this behaviour could be useful, and better than array_merge.

--Julian
up
40
ChrisM
2 years ago
I wished to point out that while other comments state that the spread operator should be faster than array_merge, I have actually found the opposite to be true for normal arrays. This is the case in both PHP 7.4 as well as PHP 8.0. The difference should be negligible for most applications, but I wanted to point this out for accuracy.

Below is the code used to test, along with the results:

<?php
$before
= microtime(true);

for (
$i=0 ; $i<10000000 ; $i++) {
$array1 = ['apple','orange','banana'];
$array2 = ['carrot','lettuce','broccoli'];

$array1 = [...$array1,...$array2];
}

$after = microtime(true);
echo (
$after-$before) . " sec for spread\n";

$before = microtime(true);

for (
$i=0 ; $i<10000000 ; $i++) {
$array1 = ['apple','orange','banana'];
$array2 = ['carrot','lettuce','broccoli'];

$array1 = array_merge($array1,$array2);
}

$after = microtime(true);
echo (
$after-$before) . " sec for array_merge\n";
?>

PHP 7.4:
1.2135608196259 sec for spread
1.1402177810669 sec for array_merge

PHP 8.0:
1.1952061653137 sec for spread
1.099925994873 sec for array_merge
up
11
Andreas Hofmann
2 years ago
In addition to the text and Julian Egelstaffs comment regarding to keep the keys preserved with the + operator:
When they say "input arrays with numeric keys will be renumbered" they MEAN it. If you think you are smart and put your numbered keys into strings, this won't help. Strings which contain an integer will also be renumbered! I fell into this trap while merging two arrays with book ISBNs as keys. So let's have this example:

<?php
$test1
['24'] = 'Mary';
$test1['17'] = 'John';

$test2['67'] = 'Phil';
$test2['33'] = 'Brandon';

$result1 = array_merge($test1, $test2);
var_dump($result1);

$result2 = [...$test1, ...$test2]; // mentioned by fsb
var_dump($result2);
?>

You will get both:

array(4) {
[0]=>
string(4) "Mary"
[1]=>
string(4) "John"
[2]=>
string(4) "Phil"
[3]=>
string(7) "Brandon"
}

Use the + operator or array_replace, this will preserve - somewhat - the keys:

<?php
$result1
= array_replace($test1, $test2);
var_dump($result1);

$result2 = $test1 + $test2;
var_dump($result2);
?>

You will get both:

array(4) {
[24]=>
string(4) "Mary"
[17]=>
string(4) "John"
[67]=>
string(4) "Phil"
[33]=>
string(7) "Brandon"
}

The keys will keep the same, the order will keep the same, but with a little caveat: The keys will be converted to integers.
up
13
fsb at thefsb dot org
4 years ago
We no longer need array_merge() as of PHP 7.4.

[...$a, ...$b]

does the same as

array_merge($a, $b)

and can be faster too.

https://wiki.php.net/rfc/spread_operator_for_array#advantages_over_array_merge
up
6
JoshE
2 years ago
Not to contradict ChrisM's test, but I ran their code example and I got very different results for PHP 8.0.

Testing PHP 8.0.14
1.4955070018768 sec for spread
4.4120140075684 sec for array_merge
To Top