empty

(PHP 4, PHP 5, PHP 7)

empty检查一个变量是否为空

说明

empty ( mixed $var ) : bool

判断一个变量是否被认为是空的。当一个变量并不存在,或者它的值等同于FALSE,那么它会被认为不存在。如果变量不存在的话,empty()并不会产生警告。

参数

var

待检查的变量

Note:

在 PHP 5.5 之前,empty() 仅支持变量;任何其他东西将会导致一个解析错误。换言之,下列代码不会生效: empty(trim($name))。 作为替代,应该使用trim($name) == false.

没有警告会产生,哪怕变量并不存在。 这意味着 empty() 本质上与 !isset($var) || $var == false 等价。

返回值

var存在,并且是一个非空非零的值时返回 FALSE 否则返回 TRUE.

以下的东西被认为是空的:

  • "" (空字符串)
  • 0 (作为整数的0)
  • 0.0 (作为浮点数的0)
  • "0" (作为字符串的0)
  • NULL
  • FALSE
  • array() (一个空数组)
  • $var; (一个声明了,但是没有值的变量)

更新日志

版本 说明
5.5.0

empty() 现在支持表达式了,而不仅仅是变量。

5.4.0

检查非数字的字符串偏移量会返回 TRUE.

范例

Example #1 一个简单的 empty()isset() 的比较。

<?php
$var 
0;

// Evaluates to true because $var is empty
if (empty($var)) {
    echo 
'$var is either 0, empty, or not set at all';
}

// Evaluates as true because $var is set
if (isset($var)) {
    echo 
'$var is set even though it is empty';
}
?>

Example #2 在字符串偏移量上使用empty()

PHP 5.4 修改了当传入的是字符串偏移量时, empty() 的行为

<?php
$expected_array_got_string 
'somestring';
var_dump(empty($expected_array_got_string['some_key']));
var_dump(empty($expected_array_got_string[0]));
var_dump(empty($expected_array_got_string['0']));
var_dump(empty($expected_array_got_string[0.5]));
var_dump(empty($expected_array_got_string['0.5']));
var_dump(empty($expected_array_got_string['0 Mostel']));
?>

以上例程在PHP 5.3中的输出:

bool(false)
bool(false)
bool(false)
bool(false)
bool(false)
bool(false)

以上例程在PHP 5.4中的输出:

bool(true)
bool(false)
bool(false)
bool(false)
bool(true)
bool(true)

注释

Note: 因为是一个语言构造器而不是一个函数,不能被 可变函数 调用。

Note:

当对一个不可见的对象属性使用 empty() 时, __isset() 方法如果存在的话,它将会被调用。

参见

add a note add a note

User Contributed Notes 34 notes

up
71
Janci
10 years ago
Please note that results of empty() when called on non-existing / non-public variables of a class are a bit confusing if using magic method __get (as previously mentioned by nahpeps at gmx dot de). Consider this example:

<?php
class Registry
{
    protected
$_items = array();
    public function
__set($key, $value)
    {
       
$this->_items[$key] = $value;
    }
    public function
__get($key)
    {
        if (isset(
$this->_items[$key])) {
            return
$this->_items[$key];
        } else {
            return
null;
        }
    }
}

$registry = new Registry();
$registry->empty = '';
$registry->notEmpty = 'not empty';

var_dump(empty($registry->notExisting)); // true, so far so good
var_dump(empty($registry->empty)); // true, so far so good
var_dump(empty($registry->notEmpty)); // true, .. say what?
$tmp = $registry->notEmpty;
var_dump(empty($tmp)); // false as expected
?>

The result for empty($registry->notEmpty) is a bit unexpeced as the value is obviously set and non-empty. This is due to the fact that the empty() function uses __isset() magic functin in these cases. Although it's noted in the documentation above, I think it's worth mentioning in more detail as the behaviour is not straightforward. In order to achieve desired (expexted?) results, you need to add  __isset() magic function to your class:

<?php
class Registry
{
    protected
$_items = array();
    public function
__set($key, $value)
    {
       
$this->_items[$key] = $value;
    }
    public function
__get($key)
    {
        if (isset(
$this->_items[$key])) {
            return
$this->_items[$key];
        } else {
            return
null;
        }
    }
    public function
__isset($key)
    {
        if (isset(
$this->_items[$key])) {
            return (
false === empty($this->_items[$key]));
        } else {
            return
null;
        }
    }
}

$registry = new Registry();
$registry->empty = '';
$registry->notEmpty = 'not empty';

var_dump(empty($registry->notExisting)); // true, so far so good
var_dump(empty($registry->empty)); // true, so far so good
var_dump(empty($registry->notEmpty)); // false, finally!
?>

It actually seems that empty() is returning negation of the __isset() magic function result, hence the negation of the empty() result in the __isset() function above.
up
60
steven at nevvix dot com
8 years ago
When you need to accept these as valid, non-empty values:
- 0 (0 as an integer)
- 0.0 (0 as a float)
- "0" (0 as a string)

<?php
function is_blank($value) {
    return empty(
$value) && !is_numeric($value);
}
?>

This is similar to Rails' blank? method.
up
14
phpsort
8 years ago
I'm summarising a few points on empty() with inaccessible properties, in the hope of saving others a bit of time. Using PHP 5.3.2.
<?php
class MyClass {
    private
$foo = 'foo';
}
$myClass = new MyClass;
echo
$myClass->foo;
?>
As expected, this gives "Fatal error: Cannot access private property MyClass::$foo".
But substitute the line
if (empty($myClass->foo)) echo 'foo is empty'; else echo 'foo is not empty';
and we get the misleading result "foo is empty".
There is NO ERROR OR WARNING, so this is a real gotcha. Your code will just go wrong silently, and I would say it amounts to a bug.
If you add two magic functions to the class:
public function __get($var) { return $this->$var; }
public function __isset($var) { return isset($this->$var); }
then we get the expected result. You need both functions.
For empty($myClass->foo), I believe PHP calls __isset, and if that is true returns the result of empty on the result of __get. (Some earlier posts wrongly suggest PHP just returns the negation of __isset).
BUT …
See the earlier post by php at lanar dot com. I confirm those results, and if you extend the test with isset($x->a->b->c) it appears that __isset is only called for the last property in the chain. Arguably another bug. empty() behaves in the same way. So things are not as clear as we might hope.
See also the note on empty() at
http://uk3.php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.overloading.php
Clear as mud!
up
15
martin dot aarhof at gmail dot com
7 years ago
<?php
$str
= '            ';
var_dump(empty($str)); // boolean false
?>

So remember to trim your strings first!

<?php
$str
= '        ';
$str = trim($str);
var_dump(empty($str)); // boolean true
?>
up
12
Anonymous
11 years ago
To add on to what anon said, what's happening in john_jian's example seems unusual because we don't see the implicit typecasting going on behind the scenes.  What's really happening is:

$a = '';
$b = 0;
$c = '0';

(int)$a == $b -> true, because any string that's not a number gets converted to 0
$b==(int)$c -> true, because the int in the string gets converted
and
$a==$c -> false, because they're being compared as strings, rather than integers.  (int)$a==(int)$c should return true, however.

Note: I don't remember if PHP even *has* typecasting, much less if this is the correct syntax.  I'm just using something for the sake of examples.
up
9
chrisdmiddleton at gmail dot com
5 years ago
If you want to use empty() to evaluate an expression (not a variable), and you don't have PHP 5.5+, you can do it by wrapping the call to empty in a function, like so:
<?php
function is_empty($var) {

    return empty(
$var);

}
?>
Then you can do something like
<?php
if(is_empty(NULL)) {
/* ... */
}
?>
without issue, since the local variable $var is being tested rather than the expression in the function call itself.
up
15
denobasis-bozic et yahoo.com
10 years ago
test if all multiarray's are empty

<?php
function is_multiArrayEmpty($multiarray) {
    if(
is_array($multiarray) and !empty($multiarray)){
       
$tmp = array_shift($multiarray);
            if(!
is_multiArrayEmpty($multiarray) or !is_multiArrayEmpty($tmp)){
                return
false;
            }
            return
true;
    }
    if(empty(
$multiarray)){
        return
true;
    }
    return
false;
}

$testCase = array (    
0 => '',
1 => "",
2 => null,
3 => array(),
4 => array(array()),
5 => array(array(array(array(array())))),
6 => array(array(), array(), array(), array(), array()),
7 => array(array(array(), array()), array(array(array(array(array(array(), array())))))),
8 => array(null),
9 => 'not empty',
10 => "not empty",
11 => array(array("not empty")),
12 => array(array(),array("not empty"),array(array()))
);

foreach (
$testCase as $key => $case ) {
    echo
"$key is_multiArrayEmpty= ".is_multiArrayEmpty($case)."<br>";
}
?>

OUTPUT:
========

0 is_multiArrayEmpty= 1
1 is_multiArrayEmpty= 1
2 is_multiArrayEmpty= 1
3 is_multiArrayEmpty= 1
4 is_multiArrayEmpty= 1
5 is_multiArrayEmpty= 1
6 is_multiArrayEmpty= 1
7 is_multiArrayEmpty= 1
8 is_multiArrayEmpty= 1
9 is_multiArrayEmpty=
10 is_multiArrayEmpty=
11 is_multiArrayEmpty=
12 is_multiArrayEmpty=
up
8
aidan1103 at yahoo dot com
9 years ago
empty() should not necessarily return the negation of the __isset() magic function result, if you set a data member to 0, isset() should return true and empty should also return true.  A simpler implementation of the __isset magic function would be:

public function __isset($key) {
  return isset($this->{$key});
}

I don't understand why this isn't included in stdClass and inherited by default.
up
5
mcfogw at gmail dot com
3 years ago
I'm comparing behavior of `!` and `empty()`, find an undocumented behavior here.

just like cast-to-boolean, `empty()` cares about if SimpleXML object is made from emty tags.

`empty(simplexml_load_string('<root />'))` is TRUE

this behavior begins from php 5.1.0~7, in 5.0.x that's FALSE

proof here => https://3v4l.org/74Tc4
up
9
chris dot wisefool at gmail dot com
8 years ago
Note that checking the existence of a subkey of an array when that subkey does not exist but the parent does and is a string will return false for empty.

i.e.

<?php
$params
= array('search'=>'1');
empty(
$params['search']['filter']); # returns false
?>

This is correct, per the documentation (http://php.net/manual/en/language.types.string.php); quite a bit down the page is the Warning: "Writing to an out of range offset pads the string with spaces. Non-integer types are converted to integer." ) I didn't receive a warning but perhaps that's correct too...depends on whether the string -> integer conversion is considered "illegal": "Illegal offset type emits E_NOTICE."

(i.e. since $params['search'] is a string, the 'filter' subscript is converted to 0, so the test becomes empty($params['search'][0]), which is obviously false), but it tripped me up enough to mistakenly file a bug report (which I've since closed).
up
6
marko dot crni at gmail dot com
9 years ago
Calling non existing object property, empty($object->prop), will trigger __isset(), the same way as isset($object->prop) does, but there is one difference. If __isset() returns TRUE, another call to __get() will be made and actual return value will be result of empty() and result of __get().
up
4
Nanhe Kumar
5 years ago
<?php
/**
* @author :  Nanhe Kumar <nanhe.kumar@gmail.com>
* List of all empty values
**/

$testCase = array(
   
1 => '',
   
2 => "",
   
3 => null,
   
4 => array(),
   
5 => FALSE,
   
6 => NULL,
   
7=>'0',
   
8=>0,
   
);

foreach (
$testCase as $k => $v) {
    if (empty(
$v)) {
        echo
"<br> $k=>$v is empty";
    }
}
/**
Output
1=> is empty
2=> is empty
3=> is empty
4=>Array is empty
5=> is empty
6=> is empty
7=>0 is empty
8=>0 is empty
**/
?>
up
5
your dot brother dot t at hotmail dot com
4 years ago
(experienced in PHP 5.6.3) The `empty()` can't evaluate `__get()` results explicitly, so the `empty()` statement bellow always renders true
<?php
class Juice extends Liquid{
   protected
$apple;
   protected
$orange;
   public function
__get($name) {
      return
$this->$name;
   }
   public function
__construct($apple, $orange) {
     
$this->apple = $apple;
     
$this->orange = $orange;
   }
}

class
Glass {
   protected
$liquid;
   public function
__get($name) {
      return
$name == "liquid" ? $this->liquid : false;
   }
   public function
__construct() {
     
$this->juice = new Juice(3, 5);
   }
}

$glass = new Glass();
var_dump(empty($this->liquid->apple));

/**
* The output is:
* bool(true)
*/
?>

The correct way is to force the evaluation of `__get()` first, by using extra braces around implicit statements like this:
<?php
var_dump
(empty(($this->liquid->apple)));

/**
* The output is:
* bool(false)
*/
?>

So if you are using packages that utilize object oriented designs and magic methods like `__get()`, it's a good practice to always use double braces for `empty()` calls.
up
6
rodolphe dot bodeau at free dot fr
9 years ago
Be careful, if "0" (zero as a string), 0 (zero as an integer) and -0 (minus zero as an integer) return true, "-0" (minus zero as a string (yes, I already had some customers that wrote -0 into a form field)) returns false. You need to cast your variable before testing it with the empty() function :

<?php
$var
= "-0";
echo empty(
$var);  // returns false
$var = (int) $var; // casts $var as an integer
echo empty($vat);  // returns true
?>
up
3
Claudio Galdiolo
2 years ago
Warning: an "empty" object is NOT considered to be empty
<?php
$var
= new stdClass(); // "empty" object
var_dump(empty($var)); // bool(false)
?>

I don't know if there is a standard way to test for "empty" objects, I personally use array casting:
<?php
$var
= new stdClass(); // "empty" object
$var = (array) $var; // cast to empty array
var_dump(empty($var)); // bool(true)
?>
up
5
ehsmeng
9 years ago
I can't use empty() in all situations because '0' is usually not considered empty to me. I did a quick benchmark over the most common ways of testing it. '' == var suffers from '' == 0 is true so that's just there for curiosity.

<?php
    $microtimeref
= microtime(true);
   
$a = 0;
   
$b = 'asd';
    for (
$i = 0; $i < 5000000; $i++)
    {
        if (
0 == mb_strlen ($b))
        {
           
$a++;
        }
    }
    echo
"Total time 0 == mb_strlen(var): <b>" . round(microtime(true) - $microtimeref,3) . 's</b><br />';
?>

The results:

Total time 0 == mb_strlen(var): 3.141s
Total time 0 === strlen(var): 2.904s
Total time 0 == strlen(var): 2.878s
Total time '' == var: 1.774s
Total time '' === var: 1.706s
Total time empty(var): 1.496s

Thus '' === var will be my zero length string test.
up
3
tom at tomwardrop dot com
11 years ago
In reply to "admin at ninthcircuit dot info",

Using str_replace is unnecessary. I would encourage the use of trim which would most likely be faster (haven't tested) and easier. Trim also takes care of other white space like line breaks and tabs. Actually, in most of the applications I code, I use a multi-dimensional array map function with trim on the Super Globals such as $_POST, $_GET and $_COOKIE as so far, there hasn't been an instance where I would want any user input to begin or end with whitespace. The good thing about doing this is that you never have to worry about 'trimming' your input which makes your code easier and more reliable (incase you forget to trim some input).
up
4
qeremy
7 years ago
Simple solution for: "Fatal error: Can't use function return value in write context in ..."

<?php
function _empty($val) { return empty($val); }
?>
up
4
rkulla2 at gmail dot com
12 years ago
Since I didn't like how empty() considers 0 and "0" to be empty (which can easily lead to bugs in your code), and since it doesn't deal with whitespace, i created the following function:

<?php
function check_not_empty($s, $include_whitespace = false)
{
    if (
$include_whitespace) {
       
// make it so strings containing white space are treated as empty too
       
$s = trim($s);
    }
    return (isset(
$s) && strlen($s)); // var is set and not an empty string ''
}
?>

Instead of saying if (!empty($var)) { // it's not empty } you can just say if (check_not_empty($var)) { // it's not empty }.

If you want strings that only contain whitespace (such as tabs or spaces) to be treated as empty then do: check_not_empty($var, 1)

If you want to check if a string IS empty then do: !check_not_empty($var).

So, whenever you want to check if a form field both exists and contains a value just do: if (check_not_empty($_POST['foo'], 1))

no need to do if (isset() && !empty()) anymore =]
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3
Greg Hartwig
11 years ago
David from CodeXplorer:
>> The ONLY reason to use empty() is for code readability. It is the same as an IF/ELSE check.
>> So, don't bother using EMPTY in the real world.

This is NOT true.  empty() will not generate warnings if you're testing against an undefined variable as a simple boolean check will.  On production systems, warnings are usually shut off, but they are often active on development systems.

You could test a flag with
   <?php if ($flagvar)  ... ?>
but this can generate a warning if $flagvar is not set.

Instead of
   <?php if (isset($flagvar) && $flagvar)  ... ?>
you can simply use
   <?php if (!empty($flagvar))  ... ?>

for easy readability without warnings.
up
3
paul at worldwithoutwalls dot co dot uk
15 years ago
Note the exceptions when it comes to decimal numbers:

<?php
$a
= 0.00;
$b = '0.00';
echo (empty(
$a)? "empty": "not empty"); //result empty
echo (empty($b)? "empty": "not empty"); //result not empty
//BUT...
$c = intval($b);
echo (empty(
$c)? "empty": "not empty"); //result empty
?>

For those of you using MySQL, if you have a table with a column of decimal type, when you do a SELECT, your data will be returned as a string, so you'll need to do apply intval() before testing for empty.

e.g.
TABLE t has columns id MEDIUMINT and d DECIMAL(4,2)
and contains 1 row where id=1, d=0.00
<?php
$q
= "SELECT * FROM t";
$res = mysql_query($q);
$row = mysql_fetch_assoc($res);
echo (empty(
$row['d'])? "empty": "not empty"); //result not empty
?>
up
2
e dot klerks at i-bytes dot nl
9 years ago
To make an empty function, which only accepts arrays, one can use type-hinting:

<?php
// emptyArray :: [a] -> Bool

function emptyArray(array $xs){
return empty(
$xs);
}
?>

Type hinting is a good thing to use in your code, because it makes it more easy to reason about your code. Besides that, it automatically documents the code.
up
2
jmarbas at hotmail dot com
14 years ago
empty($var) will return TRUE if $var is empty (according to the definition of 'empty' above) AND if $var is not set.

I know that the statement in the "Return Values" section of the manual already says this in reverse:

"Returns FALSE if var has a non-empty and non-zero value."

but I was like "Why is this thing returning TRUE for unset variables???"... oh i see now... Its supposed to return TRUE for unset variables!!!

<?php
  ini_set
('error_reporting',E_ALL);
 
ini_set('display_errors','1');
  empty(
$var);
?>
up
2
EllisGL
12 years ago
Here's what I do for the zero issue issue:
if($val == '' && $val !== 0 && $val !== '0')
up
1
mlibazisi mabandla
10 years ago
in cases when "0" is not intended to be empty, here is a simple function to safely test for an empty string (or mixed variable):

<?php
function _empty($string){
    
$string = trim($string);
     if(!
is_numeric($string)) return empty($string);
     return
FALSE;
}
?>
up
1
thomas at thomasnoest dot nl
11 years ago
Note on the selfmade empty function below:

function_exists() returns false on language constructs and empty is a language construct.
up
2
wranvaud at gmail dot com
2 years ago
Note that if your variable only has an "end of line" (aka carriage return), PHP_EOL it is not considered as empty. Since end of lines are not always easy to spot this can be confusing.
up
1
aditycse at gmail dot com
2 years ago
<?php

/**
* Used for checking empty objects/array
* @uses How to check empty objects and array in php code
* @author Aditya Mehrotra<aditycse@gmail.com>
*/

/**
* Empty class
*/
class EmptyClass {
   
}

$obj = new stdClass();
//or any other class empty object
$emptyClassObj = new EmptyClass();
$array = array();

if (empty(
$array)) {
    echo
'array is empty'; //expected result
} else {
    echo
'array is not empty'; //unexpected result
}
echo
"<br>";

if (empty(
$obj)) {
    echo
'object is empty'; //expected result
} else {
    echo
'object is not empty'; //unexpected result
}
echo
"<br>";

if (empty(
$emptyClassObj)) {
    echo
'EmptyClass is empty'; //expected result
} else {
    echo
'EmptyClass is not empty'; //unexpected result
}
echo
"<br>";

//Result SET 1
//array is empty      => expected result
//object is not empty => ouch what happened
//EmptyClass is not empty => ouch what happened

/**
* So what we do for checking empty object
* @solution use any known property or check property count
* Or you can use below method
* Count function will not return 0 in empty object
*/

//Below line print "Object count:1"
echo 'Object count:' . count($obj);

echo
"<br>";

/**
* This function is used to get object item counts
* @function getCount
* @access public
* @param object|array $var
* @return integer
*/
function getCount($var) {
   
$count = 0;
    if (
is_array($var) || is_object($var)) {
        foreach (
$var as $value) {
           
$count++;
        }
    }
    unset(
$value);
    return
$count;
}

//Running code again with new logic
if (getCount($array) === 0) {
    echo
'array is empty'; //expected result
} else {
    echo
'array is not empty'; //unexpected result
}
echo
"<br>";

if (
getCount($obj) === 0) {
    echo
'object is empty'; //expected result
} else {
    echo
'object is not empty'; //unexpected result
}

echo
"<br>";

if (
getCount($emptyClassObj) === 0) {
    echo
'EmptyClass is empty'; //expected result
} else {
    echo
'EmptyClass is not empty'; //unexpected result
}

//Result SET 2
//array is empty    => expected result  ##everything is all right
//object is empty   => expected result  ##everything is all right
//EmptyClass is empty   => expected result  ##everything is all right
up
0
pm1625637 at gmail dot com
5 days ago
Be careful about this  :

<?php
$del
= '';
echo empty(
$del);
?>

Output : 1
up
0
markmanning at gmail dot com
8 months ago
I normally count() an array, so I wanted to see how empty() would stack up.

<?php
    $test
= array();
   
$test2 = array();
    for (
$x = 0; $x < 1000; $x++)  $test[] = $x;

   
$ts = microtime(true);
    for (
$x = 0; $x < 100000000; $x++)
    {
        if (
count($test))
        {
        }
    }

    echo
"Time taken:  " . (microtime(true) - $ts) . " sec\n";
?>

For 100,000,000 comparisons, here are the results against PHP 7.2.16 on my hardware:

count($test):  2.697 sec
count($test2):  2.596 sec
$test === array():  2.579 sec
$test2 === array():  2.552 sec
empty($test):  3.085 sec
empty($test2):  3.113 sec

In short, it doesn't matter what method is used although empty() is actually just ever so slightly slower despite it being a language construct.  YMMV.
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0
fahimcseiiuc at gmail dot com
9 months ago
<?php

   
/*"" (an empty string)
      0 (0 as an integer)
      0.0 (0 as a float)
      "0" (0 as a string)
      NULL
      FALSE
      array() (an empty array)*/

$anEmptyString = "";
empty(
$anEmptyString);
if(empty(
$anEmptyString) == TRUE){
    echo
"TRUE";
} else{
    echo
"FALSE";
}
echo
"<hr>";         //line break

$anIntegerNumber = 0;
empty(
$anIntegerNumber);
if(empty(
$anIntegerNumber) == TRUE){
    echo
"TRUE";
} else{
    echo
"FALSE";
}
echo
"<hr>";         //line break

$aFloatNumber = 0.0;
empty(
$aFloatNumber);
if(empty(
$aFloatNumber) == TRUE){
    echo
"TRUE";
} else{
    echo
"FALSE";
}
echo
"<hr>";       //line break

$aZeroValuedString = "0";
empty(
$aZeroValuedString);
if(empty(
$aZeroValuedString) == TRUE){
    echo
"TRUE";
} else{
    echo
"FALSE";
}
echo
"<hr>";        //line break

$aNULL = NULL;
empty(
$aNULL);
if(empty(
$aNULL) == TRUE){
    echo
"TRUE";
} else{
    echo
"FALSE";
}
echo
"<hr>";        //line break

$aBooleanFALSE = FALSE;
empty(
$aBooleanFALSE);
if(empty(
$aBooleanFALSE) == TRUE){
    echo
"TRUE";
} else{
    echo
"FALSE";
}
echo
"<hr>";        //line break

$anEmptyArray = array();
empty(
$anEmptyArray);
if(empty(
$anEmptyArray) == TRUE){
    echo
"TRUE";
} else{
    echo
"FALSE";
}
echo
"<hr>";       //line break

?>
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0
xzero at elite7hackers dot net
2 years ago
Note that empty() will return false on null byte. Eg.

<?php
// Save to variable, so it works on older PHP versions
$null_byte = chr(0); // === \0

var_dump(
    empty(
null),
    empty(
$null_byte)
);
/**
* Results:
*
* bool(true)
* bool(false)
*/
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0
Javier Alfonso
3 years ago
If you test an element of an array (like $_POST['key]), it test if the key doesn't exist or if it exist if its value is empty and never emit a warning.

For who don't want to test what happen if passed an array element here is my test and result.

<?php
$a
= array();
$b = array('key');
$c = array('key' => false);
$d = array('key' => 'La verdad nos hace libres');

echo (empty(
$a['key'])?'A empty':'A not empty'), ' - ', (empty($b['key'])?'B empty':'B not empty'), ' - ', (empty($c['key'])?'C empty':'C not empty'), ' - ', (empty($d['key'])?'D empty':'D not empty');
?>

And the result is:

    A empty - B empty - C empty - D not empty
up
-1
GazetteSDF
1 year ago
For the verification of a form, to "block" entries such as a simple space or other, I thought of this combination:

function isEmpty($string){
    $val = preg_replace('#[^A-Za-z0-9]+#', '', $string) ;
    $val = trim($string, '');
    return ($string=='') ;
}

This protects entries like: ' ' ,'  -  ', '. - +', ... On entries like name, profession, ... it's helpful
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