PHPerKaigi 2024

Sichtbarkeit

Die Sichtbarkeit einer Eigenschaft, Methode oder (von PHP 7.1.0 an) einer Konstante kann definiert werden, indem man der Deklaration eines der Schlüsselwörter public, protected oder private voranstellt. Auf public deklarierte Elemente kann von überall her zugegriffen werden. Protected beschränkt den Zugang auf Elternklassen und abgeleitete Klassen (sowie die Klasse, die das Element definiert). Private grenzt die Sichtbarkeit einzig auf die Klasse ein, die das Element definiert.

Sichtbarkeit von Membern

Klasseneigenschaften können als public, private oder protected definiert werden. Eigenschaften, die ohne explizites Schlüsselwort für die Sichtbarkeit deklariert sind, werden als public definiert.

Beispiel #1 Eigenschaftendeklaration

<?php
/**
* Definiere MyClass
*/
class MyClass
{
public
$public = 'Public';
protected
$protected = 'Protected';
private
$private = 'Private';

function
printHello()
{
echo
$this->public;
echo
$this->protected;
echo
$this->private;
}
}

$obj = new MyClass();
echo
$obj->public; // Funktioniert
echo $obj->protected; // Fataler Fehler
echo $obj->private; // Fataler Fehler
$obj->printHello(); // Zeigt Public, Protected und Private


/**
* Definiere MyClass2
*/
class MyClass2 extends MyClass
{
// Wir können die public- und protected-Eigenschaften neu deklarieren,
// aber nicht die private
public $public = 'Public2';
protected
$protected = 'Protected2';

function
printHello()
{
echo
$this->public;
echo
$this->protected;
echo
$this->private;
}
}

$obj2 = new MyClass2();
echo
$obj2->public; // Funktioniert
echo $obj2->protected; // Fataler Fehler
echo $obj2->private; // Undefiniert
$obj2->printHello(); // Zeigt Public2, Protected2, Undefined

?>

Sichtbarkeit von Methoden

Klassenmethoden müssen mit public, private oder protected definiert werden. Methoden ohne jede explizite Deklaration sind als public definiert.

Beispiel #2 Methodendeklaration

<?php
/**
* Definiere MyClass
*/
class MyClass
{
// Deklariert einen public Konstruktor
public function __construct() { }

// Deklariere eine public Funktion
public function MyPublic() { }

// Deklariere eine protected Funktion
protected function MyProtected() { }

// Deklariere eine private Funktion
private function MyPrivate() { }

// Dies ist public
function Foo()
{
$this->MyPublic();
$this->MyProtected();
$this->MyPrivate();
}
}

$myclass = new MyClass;
$myclass->MyPublic(); // Funktioniert
$myclass->MyProtected(); // Fataler Fehler
$myclass->MyPrivate(); // Fataler Fehler
$myclass->Foo(); // Public, Protected und Private funktionieren


/**
* Definiere MyClass2
*/
class MyClass2 extends MyClass
{
// Dies ist public
function Foo2()
{
$this->MyPublic();
$this->MyProtected();
$this->MyPrivate(); // Fataler Fehler
}
}

$myclass2 = new MyClass2;
$myclass2->MyPublic(); // Funktioniert
$myclass2->Foo2(); // Public und Protected funktionieren, Private nicht

class Bar
{
public function
test() {
$this->testPrivate();
$this->testPublic();
}

public function
testPublic() {
echo
"Bar::testPublic\n";
}

private function
testPrivate() {
echo
"Bar::testPrivate\n";
}
}

class
Foo extends Bar
{
public function
testPublic() {
echo
"Foo::testPublic\n";
}

private function
testPrivate() {
echo
"Foo::testPrivate\n";
}
}

$myFoo = new Foo();
$myFoo->test(); // Bar::testPrivate
// Foo::testPublic
?>

Sichtbarkeit von Konstanten

Von PHP 7.1.0 an können Klassenkonstanten als public, private, oder protected definiert werden. Konstanten, die ohne eine explizite Sichtbarkeitsangabe deklariert wurden, sind public.

Beispiel #3 Konstantendeklaration von PHP 7.1.0 an

<?php
/**
* Definiere MyClass
*/
class MyClass
{
// Deklariere eine öffentliche Konstante
public const MY_PUBLIC = 'öffentlich';

// Deklariere eine geschützte Konstante
protected const MY_PROTECTED = 'geschützt';

// Deklariere eine private Konstante
private const MY_PRIVATE = 'privat';

public function
foo()
{
echo
self::MY_PUBLIC;
echo
self::MY_PROTECTED;
echo
self::MY_PRIVATE;
}
}

$myclass = new MyClass();
MyClass::MY_PUBLIC; // funktioniert
MyClass::MY_PROTECTED; // fataler Fehler
MyClass::MY_PRIVATE; // fataler Fehler
$myclass->foo(); // öffentlich, geschützt und private funktioniert


/**
* Definiere MyClass2
*/
class MyClass2 extends MyClass
{
// Dies ist öffentlich
function foo2()
{
echo
self::MY_PUBLIC;
echo
self::MY_PROTECTED;
echo
self::MY_PRIVATE; // fataler Fehler
}
}

$myclass2 = new MyClass2;
echo
MyClass2::MY_PUBLIC; // funktioniert
$myclass2->foo2(); // öffentlich und geschützt funktioniert, aber nicht privat
?>

Sichtbarkeit von anderen Objekten

Objekte des gleichen Types haben untereinander Zugriff auf die als private und protected markierten Member, obwohl es sich nicht um die gleichen Instanzen handelt. Dies liegt daran, dass die Details über die Implementierung innerhalb solcher Objekte bekannt sind.

Beispiel #4 Zugriff auf als private markierte Member des gleichen Objekttyps

<?php
class Test
{
private
$foo;

public function
__construct($foo)
{
$this->foo = $foo;
}

private function
bar()
{
echo
'Zugriff auf die private Methode';
}

public function
baz(Test $other)
{
// Ändern der privaten Eigenschaft ist möglich:
$other->foo = 'Hallo';
var_dump($other->foo);

// Aufruf der privaten Methode ist ebenfalls möglich:
$other->bar();
}
}

$test = new Test('test');

$test->baz(new Test('other'));
?>

Das oben gezeigte Beispiel erzeugt folgende Ausgabe:

string(5) "Hallo"
Zugriff auf die private Methode
+
add a note

User Contributed Notes 7 notes

up
61
pgl at yoyo dot org
8 years ago
Just a quick note that it's possible to declare visibility for multiple properties at the same time, by separating them by commas.

eg:

<?php
class a
{
protected
$a, $b;

public
$c, $d;

private
$e, $f;
}
?>
up
20
r dot wilczek at web-appz dot de
18 years ago
Beware: Visibility works on a per-class-base and does not prevent instances of the same class accessing each others properties!

<?php
class Foo
{
private
$bar;

public function
debugBar(Foo $object)
{
// this does NOT violate visibility although $bar is private
echo $object->bar, "\n";
}

public function
setBar($value)
{
// Neccessary method, for $bar is invisible outside the class
$this->bar = $value;
}

public function
setForeignBar(Foo $object, $value)
{
// this does NOT violate visibility!
$object->bar = $value;
}
}

$a = new Foo();
$b = new Foo();
$a->setBar(1);
$b->setBar(2);
$a->debugBar($b); // 2
$b->debugBar($a); // 1
$a->setForeignBar($b, 3);
$b->setForeignBar($a, 4);
$a->debugBar($b); // 3
$b->debugBar($a); // 4
?>
up
8
jc dot flash at gmail dot com
11 years ago
if not overwritten, self::$foo in a subclass actually refers to parent's self::$foo
<?php
class one
{
protected static
$foo = "bar";
public function
change_foo($value)
{
self::$foo = $value;
}
}

class
two extends one
{
public function
tell_me()
{
echo
self::$foo;
}
}
$first = new one;
$second = new two;

$second->tell_me(); // bar
$first->change_foo("restaurant");
$second->tell_me(); // restaurant
?>
up
6
Joshua Watt
16 years ago
I couldn't find this documented anywhere, but you can access protected and private member varaibles in different instance of the same class, just as you would expect

i.e.

<?php
class A
{
protected
$prot;
private
$priv;

public function
__construct($a, $b)
{
$this->prot = $a;
$this->priv = $b;
}

public function
print_other(A $other)
{
echo
$other->prot;
echo
$other->priv;
}
}

class
B extends A
{
}

$a = new A("a_protected", "a_private");
$other_a = new A("other_a_protected", "other_a_private");

$b = new B("b_protected", "ba_private");

$other_a->print_other($a); //echoes a_protected and a_private
$other_a->print_other($b); //echoes b_protected and ba_private

$b->print_other($a); //echoes a_protected and a_private
?>
up
2
bishop at php dot net
7 years ago
> Members declared protected can be accessed only within
> the class itself and by inherited classes. Members declared
> as private may only be accessed by the class that defines
> the member.

This is not strictly true. Code outside the object can get and set private and protected members:

<?php
class Sealed { private $value = 'foo'; }

$sealed = new Sealed;
var_dump($sealed); // private $value => string(3) "foo"

call_user_func(\Closure::bind(
function () use (
$sealed) { $sealed->value = 'BAZ'; },
null,
$sealed
));

var_dump($sealed); // private $value => string(3) "BAZ"

?>

The magic lay in \Closure::bind, which allows an anonymous function to bind to a particular class scope. The documentation on \Closure::bind says:

> If an object is given, the type of the object will be used
> instead. This determines the visibility of protected and
> private methods of the bound object.

So, effectively, we're adding a run-time setter to $sealed, then calling that setter. This can be elaborated to generic functions that can force set and force get object members:

<?php
function force_set($object, $property, $value) {
call_user_func(\Closure::bind(
function () use (
$object, $property, $value) {
$object->{$property} = $value;
},
null,
$object
));
}

function
force_get($object, $property) {
return
call_user_func(\Closure::bind(
function () use (
$object, $property) {
return
$object->{$property};
},
null,
$object
));
}

force_set($sealed, 'value', 'quux');
var_dump(force_get($sealed, 'value')); // 'quux'

?>

You should probably not rely on this ability for production quality code, but having this ability for debugging and testing is handy.
up
0
alperenberatdurmus at gmail dot com
10 months ago
Dynamic properties are "public".
<?php
class MyClass {
public function
setProperty($value) {
$this->dynamicProperty = $value;
}
}
$obj = new MyClass();
$obj->setProperty('Hello World');
echo
$obj->dynamicProperty; // Outputs "Hello World"
?>

This usage is the same as well:
<?php
class MyClass {
}
$obj = new MyClass();
$obj->dynamicProperty = 'Hello World';
echo
$obj->dynamicProperty; // Outputs "Hello World"
?>
up
0
kostya at eltexsoft dot com
2 years ago
I see we can redeclare private properties into child class
<?php
class A{
private
int $private_prop = 4;
protected
int $protected_prop = 8;
}

class
B extends A{
private
int $private_prop = 7; // we can redeclare private property!!!
public function printAll() {
echo
$this->private_prop;
echo
$this->protected_prop;
}
}

$b = new B;
$b->printAll(); // show 78
}
?>
To Top