PHPCon Poland 2024

exit

(PHP 4, PHP 5, PHP 7, PHP 8)

exitGibt eine Meldung aus und beendet das aktuelle Skript

Beschreibung

exit(string $status = ?): void
exit(int $status): void

Beendet die Ausführung des Skripts. Shutdown-Funktionen und Objekt-Destruktoren werden immer ausgeführt, auch wenn exit() aufgerufen wurde.

exit ist ein Sprachkonstrukt und kann ohne Klammern aufgerufen werden, wenn kein status übergeben wird.

Parameter-Liste

status

Falls status eine Zeichenkette ist, gibt diese Funktion beim Beenden den status aus.

Falls status vom Typ int ist, wird dieser Wert als Exit-Status verwendet anstatt ausgegeben zu werden. Ein Exit-Status sollte im Bereich von 0 bis 254 liegen, weil der Exit-Status 255 von PHP reserviert ist und deshalb nicht benutzt werden sollte. Der Status 0 wird verwendet, um ein Programm erfolgreich zu beenden.

Rückgabewerte

Es wird kein Wert zurückgegeben.

Beispiele

Beispiel #1 exit-Beispiel

<?php

$dateiname
= '/pfad/zur/datei';
$datei = fopen($dateiname, 'r')
or exit(
"kann Datei $dateiname nicht öffnen");

?>

Beispiel #2 exit-Status-Beispiel

<?php

// das Programm normal beenden
exit;
exit();
exit(
0);

// das Programm mit einem Fehlercode beenden
exit(1);
exit(
0376); // oktal

?>

Beispiel #3 Shutdown-Funktionen und Destruktoren werden trotzdem aufgerufen

<?php
class Foo
{
public function
__destruct()
{
echo
'Destruktor: ' . __METHOD__ . '()' . PHP_EOL;
}
}

function
shutdown()
{
echo
'Shutdown-Funktion: ' . __FUNCTION__ . '()' . PHP_EOL;
}

$foo = new Foo();
register_shutdown_function('shutdown');

exit();
echo
'Das hier wird nicht mehr ausgegeben werden.';
?>

Das oben gezeigte Beispiel erzeugt folgende Ausgabe:

Shutdown-Funktion: shutdown()
 Destruktor: Foo::__destruct()

Anmerkungen

Hinweis: Da dies ein Sprachkonstrukt und keine Funktion ist, können Sie dieses nicht mit Variablenfunktionen oder benannten Parametern verwenden.

Hinweis:

Dieses Sprachkonstrukt entspricht die().

Siehe auch

add a note

User Contributed Notes 14 notes

up
35
dexen dot devries at gmail dot com
13 years ago
If you want to avoid calling exit() in FastCGI as per the comments below, but really, positively want to exit cleanly from nested function call or include, consider doing it the Python way:

define an exception named `SystemExit', throw it instead of calling exit() and catch it in index.php with an empty handler to finish script execution cleanly.

<?php

// file: index.php
class SystemExit extends Exception {}
try {
/* code code */
}
catch (
SystemExit $e) { /* do nothing */ }
// end of file: index.php

// some deeply nested function or .php file

if (SOME_EXIT_CONDITION)
throw new
SystemExit(); // instead of exit()

?>
up
32
albert at removethis dot peschar dot net
15 years ago
jbezorg at gmail proposed the following:

<?php

if($_SERVER['SCRIPT_FILENAME'] == __FILE__ )
header('Location: /');

?>

After sending the `Location:' header PHP _will_ continue parsing, and all code below the header() call will still be executed. So instead use:

<?php

if($_SERVER['SCRIPT_FILENAME'] == __FILE__)
{
header('Location: /');
exit;
}

?>
up
18
theonenkl at gmail dot com
9 years ago
A side-note for the use of exit with finally: if you exit somewhere in a try block, the finally won't be executed. Could not sound obvious: for instance in Java you never issue an exit, at least a return in your controller; in PHP instead you could find yourself exiting from a controller method (e.g. in case you issue a redirect).

Here follows the POC:

<?php
echo "testing finally wit exit\n";

try {
echo
"In try, exiting\n";

exit;
} catch(
Exception $e) {
echo
"catched\n";
} finally {
echo
"in finally\n";
}

echo
"In the end\n";
?>

This will print:

testing finally wit exit
In try, exiting
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11
vincent dot laag at gmail dot com
13 years ago
Don't use the exit() function in the auto prepend file with fastcgi (linux/bsd os).
It has the effect of leaving opened files with for result at least a nice "Too many open files ..." error.
up
9
void a t informance d o t info
15 years ago
To rich dot lovely at klikzltd dot co dot uk:

Using a "@" before header() to suppress its error, and relying on the "headers already sent" error seems to me a very bad idea while building any serious website.

This is *not* a clean way to prevent a file from being called directly. At least this is not a secure method, as you rely on the presence of an exception sent by the parser at runtime.

I recommend using a more common way as defining a constant or assigning a variable with any value, and checking for its presence in the included script, like:

in index.php:
<?php
define
('INDEX', true);
?>

in your included file:
<?php
if (!defined('INDEX')) {
die(
'You cannot call this script directly !');
}
?>

BR.

Ninj
up
3
jean dot claveau at gmail dot com
4 years ago
Beware if you enabled uopz extension, it disables exit / die() by default. They are just "skipped".

https://www.php.net/manual/en/function.uopz-allow-exit.php
up
5
emils at tvnet dot lv
20 years ago
Note, that using exit() will explicitly cause Roxen webserver to die, if PHP is used as Roxen SAPI module. There is no known workaround for that, except not to use exit(). CGI versions of PHP are not affected.
up
4
m dot libergolis at gmail dot com
8 years ago
In addition to "void a t informance d o t info", here's a one-liner that requires no constant:

<?php basename($_SERVER['PHP_SELF']) == basename(__FILE__) && die('Thou shall not pass!'); ?>

Placing it at the beginning of a PHP file will prevent direct access to the script.

To redirect to / instead of dying:

<?php
if (basename($_SERVER['PHP_SELF']) == basename(__FILE__)) {
if (
ob_get_contents()) ob_clean(); // ob_get_contents() even works without active output buffering
header('Location: /');
die;
}
?>

Doing the same in a one-liner:

<?php basename($_SERVER['PHP_SELF']) == basename(__FILE__) && (!ob_get_contents() || ob_clean()) && header('Location: /') && die; ?>

A note to security: Even though $_SERVER['PHP_SELF'] comes from the user, it's safe to assume its validity, as the "manipulation" takes place _before_ the actual file execution, meaning that the string _must_ have been valid enough to execute the file. Also, basename() is binary safe, so you can safely rely on this function.
up
1
bill dot gates at hotmail dot com
3 years ago
Be noticed about uopz (User Operations for Zend) extension of PHP. It disables (prevents) halting of PHP scripts (both FPM and CLI) on calling `exit()` and `die()` by default just after enabling the extension. Therefore your script will continue to execute.

Details: https://www.php.net/manual/en/uopz.configuration.php#ini.uopz.exit
up
5
alexyam at live dot com
12 years ago
When using php-fpm, fastcgi_finish_request() should be used instead of register_shutdown_function() and exit()

For example, under nginx and php-fpm 5.3+, this will make browsers wait 10 seconds to show output:

<?php
echo "You have to wait 10 seconds to see this.<br>";
register_shutdown_function('shutdown');
exit;
function
shutdown(){
sleep(10);
echo
"Because exit() doesn't terminate php-fpm calls immediately.<br>";
}
?>

This doesn't:

<?php
echo "You can see this from the browser immediately.<br>";
fastcgi_finish_request();
sleep(10);
echo
"You can't see this form the browser.";
?>
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3
devinemke at devinemke dot com
22 years ago
If you are using templates with numerous includes then exit() will end you script and your template will not complete (no </table>, </body>, </html> etc...). Rather than having complex nested conditional logic within your content, just create a "footer.php" file that closes all of your HTML and if you want to exit out of a script just include() the footer before you exit().

for example:

include ('header.php');
blah blah blah
if (!$mysql_connect) {
echo "unable to connect";
include ('footer.php');
exit;
}
blah blah blah
include ('footer.php');
up
0
tianyiw at vip dot qq dot com
1 year ago
These are the standard error codes in Linux or UNIX.

1 - Catchall for general errors
2 - Misuse of shell builtins (according to Bash documentation)
126 - Command invoked cannot execute
127 - “command not found”
128 - Invalid argument to exit
128+n - Fatal error signal “n”
130 - Script terminated by Control-C
255\* - Exit status out of range
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0
chris at ocproducts dot com
6 years ago
Calling 'exit' will bypass the auto_append_file option.
On some free hosting this risks you getting removed, as they may be using for ads and analytics.

So be a bit careful if using this on the most common output branch.
up
0
sunfundev at gmail dot com
6 years ago
>> Shutdown functions and object destructors will always be executed even if exit is called.

It is false if you call exit into desctructor.

Normal exit:
<?php
class A
{
public function
__destruct()
{
echo
"bye A\n";
}
}

class
B
{
public function
__destruct()
{
echo
"bye B\n";
}
}

$a = new A;
$b = new B;
exit;

// Output:
// bye B
// bye A
?>

// Exit into desctructor:
<?php
class A
{
public function
__destruct()
{
echo
"bye A\n";
}
}

class
B
{
public function
__destruct()
{
echo
"bye B\n";
exit;
}
}

$a = new A;
$b = new B;

// Output:
// bye B
?>
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