mysqli_stmt::get_result

mysqli_stmt_get_result

(PHP 5 >= 5.3.0, PHP 7, PHP 8)

mysqli_stmt::get_result -- mysqli_stmt_get_resultGets a result set from a prepared statement as a mysqli_result object

Beschreibung

Objektorientierter Stil

public mysqli_stmt::get_result(): mysqli_result|false

Prozeduraler Stil

mysqli_stmt_get_result(mysqli_stmt $statement): mysqli_result|false

Retrieves a result set from a prepared statement as a mysqli_result object. The data will be fetched from the MySQL server to PHP. This method should be called only for queries which produce a result set.

Hinweis:

Nur in mysqlnd verfügbar.

Hinweis:

This function cannot be used together with mysqli_stmt_store_result(). Both of these functions retrieve the full result set from the MySQL server.

Parameter-Liste

statement

Nur bei prozeduralem Aufruf: ein von mysqli_stmt_init() zurückgegebenes mysqli_stmt-Objekt.

Rückgabewerte

Returns false on failure. For successful queries which produce a result set, such as SELECT, SHOW, DESCRIBE or EXPLAIN, mysqli_stmt_get_result() will return a mysqli_result object. For other successful queries, mysqli_stmt_get_result() will return false. The mysqli_stmt_errno() function can be used to distinguish between the two reasons for false; due to a bug, prior to PHP 7.4.13, mysqli_errno() had to be used for this purpose.

Beispiele

Beispiel #1 Objektorientierter Stil

<?php

mysqli_report
(MYSQLI_REPORT_ERROR MYSQLI_REPORT_STRICT);
$mysqli = new mysqli("localhost""my_user""my_password""world");

$query "SELECT Name, Population, Continent FROM Country WHERE Continent=? ORDER BY Name LIMIT 1";

$stmt $mysqli->prepare($query);
$stmt->bind_param("s"$continent);

$continentList = array('Europe''Africa''Asia''North America');

foreach (
$continentList as $continent) {
    
$stmt->execute();
    
$result $stmt->get_result();
    while (
$row $result->fetch_array(MYSQLI_NUM)) {
        foreach (
$row as $r) {
            print 
"$r ";
        }
        print 
"\n";
    }
}

Beispiel #2 Prozeduraler Stil

<?php

mysqli_report
(MYSQLI_REPORT_ERROR MYSQLI_REPORT_STRICT);
$link mysqli_connect("localhost""my_user""my_password""world");

$query "SELECT Name, Population, Continent FROM Country WHERE Continent=? ORDER BY Name LIMIT 1";

$stmt mysqli_prepare($link$query);
mysqli_stmt_bind_param($stmt"s"$continent);

$continentList= array('Europe''Africa''Asia''North America');

foreach (
$continentList as $continent) {
    
mysqli_stmt_execute($stmt);
    
$result mysqli_stmt_get_result($stmt);
    while (
$row mysqli_fetch_array($resultMYSQLI_NUM)) {
        foreach (
$row as $r) {
            print 
"$r ";
        }
        print 
"\n";
    }
}

Oben gezeigte Beispiele erzeugen eine ähnliche Ausgabe wie:

Albania 3401200 Europe 
Algeria 31471000 Africa 
Afghanistan 22720000 Asia 
Anguilla 8000 North America 

Siehe auch

add a note add a note

User Contributed Notes 6 notes

up
45
Anonymous
8 years ago
I went through a lot of trouble on a server where mysqlnd wasn't available, and had a lot of headaches.

If you don't have mysqlnd installed/loaded whatever, you will get an undefined reference when trying to call "mysqli_stmt_get_result()".

I wrote my own mysqli_stmt_get_result() and a mysqli_result_fetch_array() to go with it.

<?php
class iimysqli_result
{
    public
$stmt, $nCols;
}   

function
iimysqli_stmt_get_result($stmt)
{
   
/**    EXPLANATION:
     * We are creating a fake "result" structure to enable us to have
     * source-level equivalent syntax to a query executed via
     * mysqli_query().
     *
     *    $stmt = mysqli_prepare($conn, "");
     *    mysqli_bind_param($stmt, "types", ...);
     *
     *    $param1 = 0;
     *    $param2 = 'foo';
     *    $param3 = 'bar';
     *    mysqli_execute($stmt);
     *    $result _mysqli_stmt_get_result($stmt);
     *        [ $arr = _mysqli_result_fetch_array($result);
     *            || $assoc = _mysqli_result_fetch_assoc($result); ]
     *    mysqli_stmt_close($stmt);
     *    mysqli_close($conn);
     *
     * At the source level, there is no difference between this and mysqlnd.
     **/
   
$metadata = mysqli_stmt_result_metadata($stmt);
   
$ret = new iimysqli_result;
    if (!
$ret) return NULL;

   
$ret->nCols = mysqli_num_fields($metadata);
   
$ret->stmt = $stmt;

   
mysqli_free_result($metadata);
    return
$ret;
}

function
iimysqli_result_fetch_array(&$result)
{
   
$ret = array();
   
$code = "return mysqli_stmt_bind_result(\$result->stmt ";

    for (
$i=0; $i<$result->nCols; $i++)
    {
       
$ret[$i] = NULL;
       
$code .= ", \$ret['" .$i ."']";
    };

   
$code .= ");";
    if (!eval(
$code)) { return NULL; };

   
// This should advance the "$stmt" cursor.
   
if (!mysqli_stmt_fetch($result->stmt)) { return NULL; };

   
// Return the array we built.
   
return $ret;
}
?>

Hope this helps someone.
up
18
Anon
3 years ago
Please OH PLEASE.
I have been trying to get a result set from this function, and I had 0 luck completely, for nearly 3 hours!

If you ARE using mysqli_stmt_get_results() to get a result set, in conjuction with mysqli_stmt_store_results in order to retrieve the number of rows returned, you are going to have some major trouble!

PHP Documentation states that to retrieve the number of rows returned by a prepared select sql statement, one should call the following statements respectively:

mysqli_stmt_execute($stmt);
mysqli_stmt_store_result($stmt);
$num_rows = mysqli_stmt_num_rows($stmt);

THIS IS A MAJOR DEATH TRAP, IF YOU ARE USING mysqli_stmt_get_result() in conjunction!!!! Results of doing so vary depending which statements you call first, but in the end, you will NOT get the desired result.

In conclusion, please, PLEASE, NEVER use mysqli_stmt_store_result(), then mysqli_ AND mysqli_stmt_get_result() at the the same time. This is a MAJOR death trap.

SOLUTION:
If you are trying to get a result set, and you need the number of rows returned at the same time, use the following statements respectively instead:

$result_set = mysqli_stmt_get_results($stmt);
$num_rows = mysqli_num_rows($result_set);

Reflecting on my actions, this solution may seem fairly obvious. However, to someone new using PHP (like me) or someone who is not fully comfortable with prepared statements, it's very easy to get lost by using Google and learn on your own.

Summary:
NEVER use mysqli_stmt_store_result($stmt) & mysqli_stmt_num_rows($stmt) in conjunction with mysqli_stmt_get_result($stmt). You will regret it!! I have been stuck on this for hours, and Google offered me no answer!
up
5
jeffspicer at gmail dot com
3 years ago
To prevent others from hours of screaming trying to figure out why this does not work when you have the native driver enabled.  It is because you need to make sure you enable both native drives mysqlnd and nd_mysqli on your server if you wish to use this functionality.

Otherwise just enabling the mysqlnd native driver does include the mysqli_stmt_get_result function as this apparently resides in the nd_mysqli native driver.  Unfortunately, most documentation only ever talks about the mysqlnd native driver.

Once you enable both native drivers this function works as documented.
up
25
jari dot wiklund at gmail dot com
10 years ago
Please note that this method requires the mysqlnd driver. Othervise you will get this error: Call to undefined method mysqli_stmt::get_result()
up
3
HeadlessDev
2 years ago
Thanks to everyone that leaves notes, without them I would not be able to do what I do. I wrote this function with help from notes on this page and others.

I did not have mysqlnd available to me, but wanted to be able to get_result() of a query as an object.

PLEASE NOTE: I am not an expert at PHP

Heres an example of using my get_result() to login users
<?php
   
//Sanitize input before using this function
   
function login($email, $password){
        require
'connect_db.php';
       
$query = $sql->stmt_init();
        if(
$query->prepare("SELECT CustomerId, Password, Admin FROM users WHERE Email = ?")){
           
$query->bind_param("s",$email);
           
$result = get_result($query); //USING FUNCTION  HERE
           
if($result != NULL){
               
$user = $result[0];
                if(
password_verify($password, $user->Password)){
                   
$_SESSION['user_id'] = $user->CustomerId;
                    if(
$user->Admin == 1){
                       
$_SESSION['admin'] = true;
                    }
                   
$sql->close();
                    return
true;
                }
            }
        }
       
$sql->close();
       
//If we get here they are not logged in
       
return false;
    }

   
//Returns an array with each row as an object
   
function get_result($stmt){
       
$stmt->execute(); //Execute query
       
$stmt->store_result(); //Store the results
       
$num_rows = $stmt->num_rows; //Get the number of results
       
$results = NULL;
        if(
$num_rows > 0){
           
//Get metadata about the results
           
$meta = $stmt->result_metadata();
           
//Here we get all the column/field names and create the binding code
           
$bind_code = "return mysqli_stmt_bind_result(\$stmt, ";
            while(
$_field = $meta->fetch_field()){
               
$bind_code .= "\$row[\"".$_field->name."\"], ";
            }
           
//Replace trailing ", " with ");"
           
$bind_code = substr_replace($bind_code,");", -2);
          
//Run the code, if it doesn't work return NULL
           
if(!eval($bind_code)) {
               
$stmt->close();
                return
NULL;
            }
           
//This is where we create the object and add it to our final result array
           
for($i=0;$i<$num_rows;$i++){
              
//Gets the row by index
               
$stmt->data_seek($i);
               
//Update bound variables used in $bind_code with new row values
               
$stmt->fetch();
                foreach(
$row as $key=>$value){
                   
//Create array using the column/field name as the index
                   
$_result[$key] = $value;
                }
               
//Cast $_result to object and append to our final results
               
$results[$i] = (object)$_result;
            }
        }
       
$stmt->close();
        return
$results;
    }
?>
up
2
Haravikk
5 years ago
For those interested, this function seems to always produce a stored result, making it equivalent to mysqli::store_result(), rather than fetching on demand as in the case of mysqli::use_result().

This is important as it means that you cannot control the nature of the result as you would normally by calling mysqli_stmt::store_result() prior to fetching, as I had personally expected.

So, if you want to emulate the behaviour of mysqli::use_result() you will still need to use mysqli_stmt::bind_param() and mysqli_stmt::fetch().
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