PHP 8.1.9 Released!

array_merge

(PHP 4, PHP 5, PHP 7, PHP 8)

array_mergeFührt zwei oder mehr Arrays zusammen

Beschreibung

array_merge(array ...$arrays): array

Fügt die Elemente von zwei oder mehr Arrays zusammen, indem die Werte des einen an das Ende des vorherigen angehängt werden. Das daraus resultierende Array wird zurückgegeben.

Haben die angegebenen Arrays dieselben alphanumerischen Schlüssel, dann überschreibt der spätere Wert den vorhergehenden. Falls die Arrays aber numerische Schlüssel enthalten, überschreibt der spätere Wert den ursprünglichen Wert nicht und wird stattdessen angehängt.

Werte in den Eingangsarrays mit numerischen Schlüsseln werden im resultierenden Array mit aufsteigenden Schlüsseln, die bei Null beginnen, neu nummeriert.

Parameter-Liste

arrays

Variable Liste von zusammenzufügenden Arrays.

Rückgabewerte

Gibt das resultierende Array zurück. Bei einem Aufruf ohne Argument wird ein leeres Array zurückgegeben.

Changelog

Version Beschreibung
7.4.0 Diese Funktion kann nun ohne Parameter aufgerufen werden. Zuvor war mindestens ein Parameter erforderlich.

Beispiele

Beispiel #1 array_merge()-Beispiel

<?php
$array1 
= array("farbe" => "rot"24);
$array2 = array("a""b""farbe" => "grün""form" => "trapezoid"4);
$ergebnis array_merge($array1$array2);
print_r($ergebnis);
?>

Das oben gezeigte Beispiel erzeugt folgende Ausgabe:

Array
(
    [farbe] => grün
    [0] => 2
    [1] => 4
    [2] => a
    [3] => b
    [form] => trapezoid
    [4] => 4
)

Beispiel #2 Ein einfaches array_merge()-Beispiel

<?php
$array1 
= array();
$array2 = array(=> "daten");
$ergebnis array_merge($array1$array2);
?>

Vergessen Sie nicht, dass numerische Schlüssel neu nummeriert werden!

Array
(
    [0] => daten
)

Falls Array-Elemente des zweiten Arrays an das erste Array angehängt werden sollen, ohne dass Elemente des ersten Arrays überschrieben werden und neu indexiert wird, kann der Vereinigungs-Operator + verwendet werden:

<?php
$array1 
= array(=> 'null_a'=> 'zwei_a'=> 'drei_a');
$array2 = array(=> 'eins_b'=> 'drei_b'=> 'vier_b');
$ergebnis $array1 $array2;
var_dump($ergebnis);
?>

Die Schlüssel des ersten Arrays werden beibehalten. Falls ein Schlüssel in beiden Arrays vorkommt, wird das Element des ersten Arrays verwendet und das entsprechende Element des zweiten Arrays ignoriert.

array(5) {
  [0]=>
  string(6) "null_a"
  [2]=>
  string(5) "zwei_a"
  [3]=>
  string(7) "drei_a"
  [1]=>
  string(5) "eins_b"
  [4]=>
  string(6) "vier_b"
}

Beispiel #3 array_merge() mit nicht-Array-Typen

<?php
$anfang 
'foo';
$ende = array(=> 'bar');
$ergebnis array_merge((array)$anfang, (array)$ende);
print_r($ergebnis);
?>

Das oben gezeigte Beispiel erzeugt folgende Ausgabe:

    Array
    (
        [0] => foo
        [1] => bar
    )

Siehe auch

add a note

User Contributed Notes 5 notes

up
280
Julian Egelstaff
13 years ago
In some situations, the union operator ( + ) might be more useful to you than array_merge.  The array_merge function does not preserve numeric key values.  If you need to preserve the numeric keys, then using + will do that.

ie:

<?php

$array1
[0] = "zero";
$array1[1] = "one";

$array2[1] = "one";
$array2[2] = "two";
$array2[3] = "three";

$array3 = $array1 + $array2;

//This will result in::

$array3 = array(0=>"zero", 1=>"one", 2=>"two", 3=>"three");

?>

Note the implicit "array_unique" that gets applied as well.  In some situations where your numeric keys matter, this behaviour could be useful, and better than array_merge.

--Julian
up
12
ChrisM
7 months ago
I wished to point out that while other comments state that the spread operator should be faster than array_merge, I have actually found the opposite to be true for normal arrays. This is the case in both PHP 7.4 as well as PHP 8.0. The difference should be negligible for most applications, but I wanted to point this out for accuracy.

Below is the code used to test, along with the results:

<?php
$before
= microtime(true);

for (
$i=0 ; $i<10000000 ; $i++) {
   
$array1 = ['apple','orange','banana'];
   
$array2 = ['carrot','lettuce','broccoli'];
   
   
$array1 = [...$array1,...$array2];
}

$after = microtime(true);
echo (
$after-$before) . " sec for spread\n";

$before = microtime(true);

for (
$i=0 ; $i<10000000 ; $i++) {
   
$array1 = ['apple','orange','banana'];
   
$array2 = ['carrot','lettuce','broccoli'];
   
   
$array1 = array_merge($array1,$array2);
}

$after = microtime(true);
echo (
$after-$before) . " sec for array_merge\n";
?>

PHP 7.4:
1.2135608196259 sec for spread
1.1402177810669 sec for array_merge

PHP 8.0:
1.1952061653137 sec for spread
1.099925994873 sec for array_merge
up
2
Andreas Hofmann
8 months ago
In addition to the text and Julian Egelstaffs comment regarding to keep the keys preserved with the + operator:
When they say "input arrays with numeric keys will be renumbered" they MEAN it. If you think you are smart and put your numbered keys into strings, this won't help. Strings which contain an integer will also be renumbered! I fell into this trap while merging two arrays with book ISBNs as keys. So let's have this example:

<?php
    $test1
['24'] = 'Mary';
   
$test1['17'] = 'John';

   
$test2['67'] = 'Phil';
   
$test2['33'] = 'Brandon';

   
$result1 = array_merge($test1, $test2);
   
var_dump($result1);

   
$result2 = [...$test1, ...$test2];    // mentioned by fsb
   
var_dump($result2);
?>

You will get both:

array(4) {
  [0]=>
  string(4) "Mary"
  [1]=>
  string(4) "John"
  [2]=>
  string(4) "Phil"
  [3]=>
  string(7) "Brandon"
}

Use the + operator or array_replace, this will preserve - somewhat - the keys:

<?php
    $result1
= array_replace($test1, $test2);
   
var_dump($result1);

   
$result2 = $test1 + $test2;
   
var_dump($result2);
?>

You will get both:

array(4) {
  [24]=>
  string(4) "Mary"
  [17]=>
  string(4) "John"
  [67]=>
  string(4) "Phil"
  [33]=>
  string(7) "Brandon"
}

The keys will keep the same, the order will keep the same, but with a little caveat: The keys will be converted to integers.
up
8
fsb at thefsb dot org
2 years ago
We no longer need array_merge() as of PHP 7.4.

    [...$a, ...$b]

does the same as

    array_merge($a, $b)

and can be faster too.

https://wiki.php.net/rfc/spread_operator_for_array#advantages_over_array_merge
up
0
JoshE
4 months ago
Not to contradict ChrisM's test, but I ran their code example and I got very different results for PHP 8.0.

Testing PHP 8.0.14
1.4955070018768 sec for spread
4.4120140075684 sec for array_merge
To Top