PHP 8.0.12 Released!

array_map

(PHP 4 >= 4.0.6, PHP 5, PHP 7, PHP 8)

array_mapWendet eine Callback-Funktion auf die Elemente von Arrays an

Beschreibung

array_map(?callable $callback, array $array, array ...$arrays): array

array_map() gibt ein Array zurück, das die Ergebnisse der Anwendung der Callback-Funktion callback auf den entsprechenden Index von array (und arrays, wenn weitere Arrays angegeben wurden) als Callback-Argumente enthält. Die Anzahl Parameter, welche callback akzeptiert, sollte der Anzahl der an array_map() übergebenen Arrays entsprechen. Überzählige Eingabe-Arrays werden ignoriert. Wenn eine zu geringe Anzahl von Argumenten übergeben wird, wird ein ArgumentCountError-Fehler ausgelöst.

Parameter-Liste

callback

Ein callable, das für jedes Element in jedem Array aufgerufen werden soll.

null kann als Wert an callback übergeben werden, um eine zip-Operation auf mehrere Arrays durchzuführen. Wird nur array übergeben, gibt array_map() das Eingabe-Array zurück.

array

Ein Array, auf das die callback-Funktion angewendet werden soll.

arrays

Zusätzliche variable Liste von Array-Argumenten, auf die die callback-Funktion angewendet werden soll.

Rückgabewerte

array_map() gibt ein Array zurück, das die Ergebnisse der Anwendung der callback-Funktion auf den entsprechenden Index von array (und arrays, wenn weitere Arrays angegeben wurden) als Callback-Argumente enthält.

Das zurückgegebene Array behält die Schlüssel des Array-Arguments nur bei, wenn genau ein Array übergeben wurde. Wird mehr als ein Array übergeben, hat das zurückgegebene Array aufeinanderfolgende Integer-Schlüssel.

Beispiele

Beispiel #1 array_map()-Beispiel

<?php
function cube($n)
{
    return (
$n $n $n);
}

$a = [12345];
$b array_map('cube'$a);
print_r($b);
?>

Dies speichert in $b:

Array
(
    [0] => 1
    [1] => 8
    [2] => 27
    [3] => 64
    [4] => 125
)

Beispiel #2 array_map() mit einer Lambda-Funktion

<?php
$func 
= function(int $value): int {
    return 
$value 2;
};

print_r(array_map($funcrange(15)));

// Oder ab PHP 7.4.0:

print_r(array_map(fn($value): int => $value 2range(15)));

?>
Array
(
    [0] => 2
    [1] => 4
    [2] => 6
    [3] => 8
    [4] => 10
)

Beispiel #3 array_map() - Verwendung mehrerer Arrays

<?php
function show_Spanish(int $nstring $m): string
{
    return 
"Die Zahl {$n} heißt auf Spanisch {$m}";
}

function 
map_Spanish(int $nstring $m): array
{
    return [
$n => $m];
}

$a = [12345];
$b = ['uno''dos''tres''cuatro''cinco'];

$c array_map('show_Spanish'$a$b);
print_r($c);

$d array_map('map_Spanish'$a $b);
print_r($d);
?>

Das oben gezeigte Beispiel erzeugt folgende Ausgabe:

// Ausgabe von $c
Array
(
    [0] => Die Zahl 1 heißt auf Spanisch uno
    [1] => Die Zahl 2 heißt auf Spanisch dos
    [2] => Die Zahl 3 heißt auf Spanisch tres
    [3] => Die Zahl 4 heißt auf Spanisch cuatro
    [4] => Die Zahl 5 heißt auf Spanisch cinco
)

// Ausgabe von $d
Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [1] => uno
        )

    [1] => Array
        (
            [2] => dos
        )

    [2] => Array
        (
            [3] => tres
        )

    [3] => Array
        (
            [4] => cuatro
        )

    [4] => Array
        (
            [5] => cinco
        )

)

Bei Verwendung von zwei oder mehr Arrays sollten diese die gleiche Länge besitzen, da die Callback-Funktion parallel auf die entsprechenden Elemente angewandt wird. Haben die Arrays unterschiedliche Längen, werden die kürzeren um leere Elemente erweitert, um mit der Länge des längsten übereinzustimmen.

Eine interessante Anwendung dieser Funktion ist die Konstruktion eines Arrays bestehend aus Arrays, was mit null als Name der Callback-Funktion leicht realisiert werden kann.

Beispiel #4 Durchführen einer zip-Operation von Arrays

<?php
$a 
= [12345];
$b = ['eins''zwei''drei''vier''fünf'];
$c = ['uno''dos''tres''cuatro''cinco'];

$d array_map(null$a$b$c);
print_r($d);
?>

Das oben gezeigte Beispiel erzeugt folgende Ausgabe:

Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [0] => 1
            [1] => eins
            [2] => uno
        )

    [1] => Array
        (
            [0] => 2
            [1] => zwei
            [2] => dos
        )

    [2] => Array
        (
            [0] => 3
            [1] => drei
            [2] => tres
        )

    [3] => Array
        (
            [0] => 4
            [1] => vier
            [2] => cuatro
        )

    [4] => Array
        (
            [0] => 5
            [1] => fünf
            [2] => cinco
        )

)

Beispiel #5 null-callback mit nur einem array

<?php
$array 
= [123];
var_dump(array_map(null$array));
?>

Das oben gezeigte Beispiel erzeugt folgende Ausgabe:

array(3) {
  [0]=>
  int(1)
  [1]=>
  int(2)
  [2]=>
  int(3)
}

Beispiel #6 array_map() - mit String-Schlüsseln

<?php
$arr 
= ['stringkey' => 'value'];
function 
cb1($a) {
    return [
$a];
}
function 
cb2($a$b) {
    return [
$a$b];
}
var_dump(array_map('cb1'$arr));
var_dump(array_map('cb2'$arr$arr));
var_dump(array_map(null,  $arr));
var_dump(array_map(null$arr$arr));
?>

Das oben gezeigte Beispiel erzeugt folgende Ausgabe:

array(1) {
  ["stringkey"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(5) "value"
  }
}
array(1) {
  [0]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(5) "value"
    [1]=>
    string(5) "value"
  }
}
array(1) {
  ["stringkey"]=>
  string(5) "value"
}
array(1) {
  [0]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(5) "value"
    [1]=>
    string(5) "value"
  }
}

Beispiel #7 array_map() - assoziative Arrays

Die array_map() unterstützt die Verwendung des Array-Schlüssels als Eingabe zwar nicht direkt, aber dies kann mit array_keys() simuliert werden.

<?php
$arr 
= [
    
'v1' => 'erste Version',
    
'v2' => 'zweite Version',
    
'v3' => 'dritte Version',
];

// Hinweis: Vor 7.4.0 ist stattdessen die längere Syntax für anonyme
// Funktionen zu verwenden.
$callback fn(string $kstring $v): string => "$k war die $v";

$result array_map($callbackarray_keys($arr), array_values($arr));

var_dump($result);
?>

Das oben gezeigte Beispiel erzeugt folgende Ausgabe:

array(3) {
  [0]=>
  string(24) "v1 war die erste Version"
  [1]=>
  string(25) "v2 war die zweite Version"
  [2]=>
  string(25) "v3 war die dritte Version"
}

Siehe auch

  • array_filter() - Filtert Elemente eines Arrays mittels einer Callback-Funktion
  • array_reduce() - Iterative Reduktion eines Arrays zu einem Wert mittels einer Callbackfunktion
  • array_walk() - Wendet eine vom Benutzer gelieferte Funktion auf jedes Element eines Arrays an

add a note add a note

User Contributed Notes 6 notes

up
14
lukasz dot mordawski at gmail dot com
7 years ago
Let's assume we have following situation:

<?php
class MyFilterClass {
    public function
filter(array $arr) {
        return
array_map(function($value) {
            return
$this->privateFilterMethod($value);
        });
    }

    private function
privateFilterMethod($value) {
        if (
is_numeric($value)) $value++;
        else
$value .= '.';
    }
}
?>

This will work, because $this inside anonymous function (unlike for example javascript) is the instance of MyFilterClass inside which we called it.
I hope this would be useful for anyone.
up
13
elfe1021 at gmail dot com
7 years ago
Find an interesting thing that in array_map's callable function, late static binding does not work:
<?php
class A {
    public static function
foo($name) {
        return
'In A: '.$name;
    }

    public static function
test($names) {
        return
array_map(function($n) {return static::foo($n);}, $names);
    }
}

class
B extends A{
    public static function
foo($name) {
        return
'In B: '.$name;
    }
}

$result = B::test(['alice', 'bob']);
var_dump($result);
?>

the result is:
array (size=2)
  0 => string 'In A: alice' (length=11)
  1 => string 'In A: bob' (length=9)

if I change A::test to
<?php
   
public static function test($names) {
        return
array_map([get_called_class(), 'foo'], $names);
    }
?>

Then the result is as expected:
array (size=2)
  0 => string 'In B: alice' (length=11)
  1 => string 'In B: bob' (length=9)
up
12
Mahn
6 years ago
You may be looking for a method to extract values of a multidimensional array on a conditional basis (i.e. a mixture between array_map and array_filter) other than a for/foreach loop. If so, you can take advantage of the fact that 1) the callback method on array_map returns null if no explicit return value is specified (as with everything else) and 2) array_filter with no arguments removes falsy values.

So for example, provided you have:

<?php
$data
= [
    [
       
"name" => "John",
       
"smoker" => false
   
],
    [
       
"name" => "Mary",
       
"smoker" => true
   
],
    [
       
"name" => "Peter",
       
"smoker" => false
   
],
    [
       
"name" => "Tony",
       
"smoker" => true
   
]
];
?>

You can extract the names of all the non-smokers with the following one-liner:

<?php
$names
= array_filter(array_map(function($n) { if(!$n['smoker']) return $n['name']; }, $data));
?>

It's not necessarily better than a for/foreach loop, but the occasional one-liner for trivial tasks can help keep your code cleaner.
up
11
radist-hack at yandex dot ru
12 years ago
To transpose rectangular two-dimension array, use the following code:

array_unshift($array, null);
$array = call_user_func_array("array_map", $array);

If you need to rotate rectangular two-dimension array on 90 degree, add the following line before or after (depending on the rotation direction you need) the code above:
$array = array_reverse($array);

Here is example:

<?php
$a
= array(
  array(
1, 2, 3),
  array(
4, 5, 6));
array_unshift($a, null);
$a = call_user_func_array("array_map", $a);
print_r($a);
?>

Output:

Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [0] => 1
            [1] => 4
        )

    [1] => Array
        (
            [0] => 2
            [1] => 5
        )

    [2] => Array
        (
            [0] => 3
            [1] => 6
        )

)
up
6
stijnleenknegt at gmail dot com
13 years ago
If you want to pass an argument like ENT_QUOTES to htmlentities, you can do the follow.

<?php
$array
= array_map( 'htmlentities' , $array, array_fill(0 , count($array) , ENT_QUOTES) );
?>

The third argument creates an equal sized array of $array filled with the parameter you want to give with your callback function.
up
4
CertaiN
8 years ago
The most memory-efficient array_map_recursive().

<?php
function array_map_recursive(callable $func, array $arr) {
   
array_walk_recursive($arr, function(&$v) use ($func) {
       
$v = $func($v);
    });
    return
$arr;
}
?>
To Top