PHP Velho Oeste 2024

substr_count

(PHP 4, PHP 5, PHP 7, PHP 8)

substr_countConta o número de ocorrências de uma substring

Descrição

substr_count(
    string $haystack,
    string $needle,
    int $offset = 0,
    ?int $length = null
): int

substr_count() retorna o número de vezes que a substring needle ocorre na string haystack. Note que needle faz distinção de maiúscula e minúscula.

Nota:

Esta função não conta substrings sobrepostas. Veja o exemplo abaixo!

Parâmetros

haystack

A string onde será feita a busca

needle

A substring a ser procurada

offset

A posição onde deve-se iniciar a contagem. Se a posição for negativa, a contagem começa do final da string.

length

O comprimento máximo depois da posição especificada para buscar pela substring. Mostra um alerta se a posição mais o comprimento for maior que o comprimento de haystack. Um comprimento negativo conta a partir do final de haystack.

Valor Retornado

Esta função retorna um int.

Registro de Alterações

Versão Descrição
8.0.0 length agora pode ser nulo.
7.1.0 Suporte a valores negativos para offset e length foi adicionado. length agora também pode ser 0.

Exemplos

Exemplo #1 Exemplo de substr_count()

<?php
$text
= 'This is a test';
echo
strlen($text); // 14

echo substr_count($text, 'is'); // 2

// a string é reduzida a 's is a test', então mostra 1
echo substr_count($text, 'is', 3);

// o texto é reduzido a 's i', então mostra 0
echo substr_count($text, 'is', 3, 3);

// gera um alerta porque 5+10 > 14
echo substr_count($text, 'is', 5, 10);


// mostra apenas 1, porque não conta substrings sobrepostos
$text2 = 'gcdgcdgcd';
echo
substr_count($text2, 'gcdgcd');
?>

Veja Também

  • count_chars() - Return information about characters used in a string
  • strpos() - Find the position of the first occurrence of a substring in a string
  • substr() - Retorna parte de uma string
  • strstr() - Find the first occurrence of a string

add a note

User Contributed Notes 10 notes

up
55
tuxedobob
7 years ago
It's worth noting this function is surprisingly fast. I first ran it against a ~500KB string on our web server. It found 6 occurrences of the needle I was looking for in 0.0000 seconds. Yes, it ran faster than microtime() could measure.

Looking to give it a challenge, I then ran it on a Mac laptop from 2010 against a 120.5MB string. For one test needle, it found 2385 occurrences in 0.0266 seconds. Another test needs found 290 occurrences in 0.114 seconds.

Long story short, if you're wondering whether this function is slowing down your script, the answer is probably not.
up
13
flobi at flobi dot com
17 years ago
Making this case insensitive is easy for anyone who needs this. Simply convert the haystack and the needle to the same case (upper or lower).

substr_count(strtoupper($haystack), strtoupper($needle))
up
4
tweston at bangordailynews dot com
8 years ago
To account for the case that jrhodes has pointed out, we can change the line to:

substr_count ( implode( ',', $haystackArray ), $needle );

This way:

array (
0 => "mystringth",
1 => "atislong"
);

Becomes

mystringth,atislong

Which brings the count for $needle = "that" to 0 again.
up
3
jrhodes at roket-enterprises dot com
14 years ago
It was suggested to use

substr_count ( implode( $haystackArray ), $needle );

instead of the function described previously, however this has one flaw. For example this array:

array (
0 => "mystringth",
1 => "atislong"
);

If you are counting "that", the implode version will return 1, but the function previously described will return 0.
up
-2
info at fat-fish dot co dot il
16 years ago
a simple version for an array needle (multiply sub-strings):
<?php

function substr_count_array( $haystack, $needle ) {
$count = 0;
foreach (
$needle as $substring) {
$count += substr_count( $haystack, $substring);
}
return
$count;
}
?>
up
-2
XinfoX X at X XkarlX X-X XphilippX X dot X XdeX
20 years ago
Yet another reference to the "cgcgcgcgcgcgc" example posted by "chris at pecoraro dot net":

Your request can be fulfilled with the Perl compatible regular expressions and their lookahead and lookbehind features.

The example

$number_of_full_pattern = preg_match_all('/(cgc)/', "cgcgcgcgcgcgcg", $chunks);

works like the substr_count function. The variable $number_of_full_pattern has the value 3, because the default behavior of Perl compatible regular expressions is to consume the characters of the string subject that were matched by the (sub)pattern. That is, the pointer will be moved to the end of the matched substring.
But we can use the lookahead feature that disables the moving of the pointer:

$number_of_full_pattern = preg_match_all('/(cg(?=c))/', "cgcgcgcgcgcgcg", $chunks);

In this case the variable $number_of_full_pattern has the value 6.
Firstly a string "cg" will be matched and the pointer will be moved to the end of this string. Then the regular expression looks ahead whether a 'c' can be matched. Despite of the occurence of the character 'c' the pointer is not moved.
up
-4
qeremy [atta] gmail [dotta] com
10 years ago
Unicode example with "case-sensitive" option;

<?php
function substr_count_unicode($str, $substr, $caseSensitive = true, $offset = 0, $length = null) {
if (
$offset) {
$str = substr_unicode($str, $offset, $length);
}

$pattern = $caseSensitive
? '~(?:'. preg_quote($substr) .')~u'
: '~(?:'. preg_quote($substr) .')~ui';
preg_match_all($pattern, $str, $matches);

return isset(
$matches[0]) ? count($matches[0]) : 0;
}

function
substr_unicode($str, $start, $length = null) {
return
join('', array_slice(
preg_split('~~u', $str, -1, PREG_SPLIT_NO_EMPTY), $start, $length));
}

$s = 'Ümit yüzüm gözüm...';
print
substr_count_unicode($s, 'ü'); // 3
print substr_count_unicode($s, 'ü', false); // 4
print substr_count_unicode($s, 'ü', false, 10); // 1

print substr_count_unicode($s, 'üm'); // 2
print substr_count_unicode($s, 'üm', false); // 3
?>
up
-7
gigi at phpmycoder dot com
15 years ago
below was suggested a function for substr_count'ing an array, yet for a simpler procedure, use the following:

<?php
substr_count
( implode( $haystackArray ), $needle );
?>
up
-8
chrisstocktonaz at gmail dot com
14 years ago
In regards to anyone thinking of using code contributed by zmindster at gmail dot com

Please take careful consideration of possible edge cases with that regex, in example:

$url = 'http://w3.host.tld/path/to/file/..../file.extension';
$url = 'http://w3.host.tld/path/to/file/../file.extension?malicous=....';

This would cause a infinite loop and for example be a possible entry point for a denial of service attack. A correct fix would require additional code, a quick hack would be just adding a additional check, without clarity or performance in mind:

...
$i = 0;
while (substr_count($url, '../') && ++$i < strlen($url))
...

-Chris
up
-5
php at blink dot at
9 years ago
This will handle a string where it is unknown if comma or period are used as thousand or decimal separator. Only exception where this leads to a conflict is when there is only a single comma or period and 3 possible decimals (123.456 or 123,456). An optional parameter is passed to handle this case (assume thousands, assume decimal, decimal when period, decimal when comma). It assumes an input string in any of the formats listed below.

function toFloat($pString, $seperatorOnConflict="f")
{
$decSeperator=".";
$thSeperator="";

$pString=str_replace(" ", $thSeperator, $pString);

$firstPeriod=strpos($pString, ".");
$firstComma=strpos($pString, ",");
if($firstPeriod!==FALSE && $firstComma!==FALSE) {
if($firstPeriod<$firstComma) {
$pString=str_replace(".", $thSeperator, $pString);
$pString=str_replace(",", $decSeperator, $pString);
}
else {
$pString=str_replace(",", $thSeperator, $pString);
}
}
else if($firstPeriod!==FALSE || $firstComma!==FALSE) {
$seperator=$firstPeriod!==FALSE?".":",";
if(substr_count($pString, $seperator)==1) {
$lastPeriodOrComma=strpos($pString, $seperator);
if($lastPeriodOrComma==(strlen($pString)-4) && ($seperatorOnConflict!=$seperator && $seperatorOnConflict!="f")) {
$pString=str_replace($seperator, $thSeperator, $pString);
}
else {
$pString=str_replace($seperator, $decSeperator, $pString);
}
}
else {
$pString=str_replace($seperator, $thSeperator, $pString);
}
}
return(float)$pString;
}

function testFloatParsing() {
$floatvals = array(
"22 000",
"22,000",
"22.000",
"123 456",
"123,456",
"123.456",
"22 000,76",
"22.000,76",
"22,000.76",
"22000.76",
"22000,76",
"1.022.000,76",
"1,022,000.76",
"1,000,000",
"1.000.000",
"1022000.76",
"1022000,76",
"1022000",
"0.76",
"0,76",
"0.00",
"0,00",
"1.00",
"1,00",
"-22 000,76",
"-22.000,76",
"-22,000.76",
"-22 000",
"-22,000",
"-22.000",
"-22000.76",
"-22000,76",
"-1.022.000,76",
"-1,022,000.76",
"-1,000,000",
"-1.000.000",
"-1022000.76",
"-1022000,76",
"-1022000",
"-0.76",
"-0,76",
"-0.00",
"-0,00",
"-1.00",
"-1,00"
);

echo "<table>
<tr>
<th>String</th>
<th>thousands</th>
<th>fraction</th>
<th>dec. if period</th>
<th>dec. if comma</th>
</tr>";

foreach ($floatvals as $fval) {
echo "<tr>";
echo "<td>" . (string) $fval . "</td>";

echo "<td>" . (float) toFloat($fval, "") . "</td>";
echo "<td>" . (float) toFloat($fval, "f") . "</td>";
echo "<td>" . (float) toFloat($fval, ".") . "</td>";
echo "<td>" . (float) toFloat($fval, ",") . "</td>";
echo "</tr>";
}
echo "</table>";
}
To Top